6 research outputs found

    Customer engagement in UK water regulation: towards a collaborative regulatory state?

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    Little is known about how processes of ‘expert’ control interact with or move towards collaborative models of regulation. This paper focuses on a critical example of such an apparent shift: customer engagement in price-setting in water regulation in Scotland and England/Wales. By drawing on original interview and documentary analysis, the paper demonstrates a neglected rationale for and usage of ‘collaborative regulation’: regulators introduced customer engagement to incentivise regulated firms into further efficiencies. This points towards an increasing hybridisation of the contemporary regulatory state, in which collaborative regulatory processes are used to advance ‘econocratic’ objectives of expert regulators

    Why do states in conflict with each other also sustain resilient cooperation in international regulation? Britain and telegraphy, 1860s-1914

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    This is the accepted manuscript of an article published online: 6, Perri, Eva Heims. 2021. Why do states in conflict with each other also sustain resilient cooperation in international regulation? Britain and telegraphy, 1860s-1914, in European Journal of International Relations

    Regulating with the Masses? Mapping the Spread of Participatory Regulation

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    Stakeholder participation in regulatory processes has become increasingly common. The literature on citizen, customer and consumer participation in regulation shows a rise in these types of engagement, based primarily on individual case studies. However, we lack a solid empirical base for the discussion of this trend. This paper asks to what extent and why this rise in participation in regulatory policy-making occurs, creating a cross-sector, cross-country map of participatory regulation. The research is based on a quantitative, dictionary-based analysis of regulatory agencies' annual reports from 1998 to 2017 (n = 781). The findings show a rise in the use of terms related to participation over time, with the notable exceptions of financial and environmental regulators. These terms are most commonly used in EU level agencies, in Australia and France, while being rarely used in the German and Austrian cases. Our analysis shows that polity level variation is a key driver of how regulators use terms related to participation, and argues that such participation is less common in countries in which stakeholder participation is carried out at the national level through centralized corporatist institutions
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