47 research outputs found

    Factors Affecting Tourist Satisfaction with Theatrical Performances: A Case Study of 'The Romance of the Song Dynasty' in Hangzhou, China

    Get PDF
    This study, for the first time, attempts to explore the factors affecting tourist satisfaction with a theatrical performance, The Romance of the Song Dynasty in Hangzhou, China. Four factors are identified to have affected tourist satisfaction: “Performance,” “Venue Environment,” “Service,” and “Stage Facilities”. These theatrical performance factors are examined to assess the relative influence on tourist overall satisfaction. Tourists have the highest satisfaction with “Stage Facilities” among all factors, however, “Service” is the most influential predictor of tourist overall satisfaction. Tourist demographic and travel characteristics towards these four theatrical performance factors reveal several significant differences. Discussions and implications are provided to theatre operators to improve tourist satisfaction with theatrical performance not only in Hangzhou, but also in the whole China

    Why tourists thirst for authenticity – and how they can find it

    Get PDF
    It has been a bumper year for tourists for the small village of Kidlington in Oxfordshire, England. Those on national, international and social media were left scratching their heads, when an unexpected flood of Chinese tourists descended on the town. Groups of curious travellers could be seen roaming down residential streets, taking pictures with locals and even entering garden

    Females and tourism activities: an insight for all-female tours in Hong Kong

    Get PDF
    Although all-female tours have become popular in Western and Asian countries, until now researchers have not paid much attention to this niche but important market. This study aims to explore female tourists’ desired activities towards an ‘all-female activity-based outbound tour’ in Hong Kong. A survey was administered to tourists who joined short- and long-haul outbound packages in Hong Kong. Female’s preferred tourism activities can be grouped into: Sightseeing; Sports; Relaxation, and Entertainment. This study found that all-female tourists are not homogenous, and the group can be segmented into three clusters: Omnivores, Univores, and Sporadic. The similarity between these three clusters was the high interests in relaxation activities. There were significant differences between the three clusters in terms of age and marital status. The findings indicate directions for tourism marketers in formulating marketing strategies towards the Hong Kong marke

    Exploring disagreement prevention and resolution in travel decision-making of young Chinese travellers

    Get PDF
    The young Chinese travel market is becoming increasingly significant in domestic and international tourism. However, there is limited research on the market. This study examines the decision-making processes of young Chinese travellers, with a particular interest in disagreement prevention and resolution. On the basis of interviews with 25 young Chinese travellers, this study found that while a small number of travellers did not perceive any disagreement, or did not voice their disagreement, the majority of interviewees described the decision-making process as being characterised by periods of disagreement. It was found that Chinese cultural values including ‘forbearance’ and ‘authority’ influence travellers’ disagreement prevention. It was discovered that travellers used five types of strategies for disagreement resolution, including: compromise, problem solving, delay, forcing, and accommodation. These strategies were primarily influenced by two Chinese cultural values: ‘reciprocity’ and ‘conformity’

    The Leading Causes and Consequences of Citizenship Pressure in the Hotel Industry

    Get PDF
    Purpose – This study aims to examine the causes of citizenship pressure and to investigate the relationship between citizenship pressure, job stress and turnover intentions. Specifically, the current study examines the effects of the personality trait of neuroticism and the organizational cultures of bureaucracy and the market. Design/methodology/approach – Data were collected from 224 hotel employees in the People’s Republic of China using a self-administered survey questionnaire. The participants completed measures examining citizenship pressure, personality, organizational culture, job stress and intention to quit. Structural equation modeling was used to test the research hypotheses. Findings – The results showed that employees who are more neurotic are more likely to experience citizenship pressure. Moreover, citizenship pressure was found to increase job stress and turnover intentions. However, a bureaucratic culture, which prizes stability, was found to reduce citizenship pressure. Practical implications – This study presents factors that may influence hotel employees’ perceptions of citizenship pressure and reveals the negative consequences of such pressure. Thus, the study results contribute to a better understanding of citizenship pressure and can be used to develop guidelines to reduce citizenship pressure in work environments. Originality/value – To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the current study is the first empirical study to examine the antecedents and consequences of citizenship pressure in the hotel industry. Moreover, previous citizenship pressure studies have mainly been conducted in a Western cultural context; it is unclear whether citizenship pressure can be similarly observed in China, where the nature and form of employment relationships differ significantly from those in Western countries

    Understanding Mainland Chinese tourists’ motivation and constraints of visiting Taiwan

    Get PDF
    China has been by far the fastest growing source market in recent years, and now is the biggest tourism source market in the world. Mainland Chinese travellers were permitted to directly visit Taiwan in 2008. Within a short period of time, the Mainland Chinese travel market has become the top source market for Taiwan’s tourism industry. However, limited attention has been paid to the travel behaviour of this significant market, such as why and why not Mainland Chinese travellers visit Taiwan. Using interviews, this study identified a list of motivation factors and travel constraint factors. Three themes, intrapersonal, interpersonal, and contextual factors, influenced Mainland Chinese tourists’ intention to visit Taiwan. Particularly, contextual factors, such as ‘the cross-strait relations’ between Mainland China and Taiwan, play a key role in influencing tourists’ visit intention. Like two sides of the same coin, ‘the cross-strait relations’ could be the facilitator to attract Mainland Chinese tourists or the inhibitor to stop Mainland Chinese visiting Taiwan

    Utilitarian vs. hedonic roles of service robots and customer stereotypes: A person-environment fit theory perspective

    Get PDF
    Purpose – Drawing on person-environment fit theory, this study investigates how the relationships between service task types (i.e., utilitarian and hedonic service tasks) and perceived authenticity (i.e., service and brand authenticity) differ under different conditions of service providers (human employee vs. service robot). This study further examines whether customers’ stereotypes toward service robots (competence vs. warmth) moderate the relationship between service types and perceived authenticity. Design/methodology/approach – Using a 2 x 2 between-subjects experimental design, Study 1 examines a casual restaurant, while Study 2 assesses a theme park restaurant. Analysis of covariance and PROCESS are used to analyze the data. Findings – Both studies reveal that human service providers in hedonic services positively affect service and brand authenticity more than robotic employees. Additionally, the robot competence stereotype moderates the relationship between hedonic services, service, and brand authenticity, while the robot warmth stereotype moderates the relationship between hedonic services and brand authenticity in Study 2. Practical implications – Restaurant managers need to understand which functions and types of service outlets are best suited for service robots in different service contexts. Robot-environment fit should be considered when developers design and managers select robots for their restaurants. Originality/value – This study blazes a new theoretical trail of service robot research to systematically propose customer experiences with different service types by drawing upon person-environment fit theory and examining the moderating role of customers’ stereotypes toward service robots
    corecore