1,448 research outputs found

    Addressing NASA\u27s Workforce Development Initiative - Slides

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    Addressing NASA\u27s Workforce Development Initiative: Intensifying Outreach and Collaborations in Nebraska\u27s Native Community - 9/24/2004 Brent D. Bowen & Mary M. Fink (University of Nebraska at Omaha); Henry R. Lehrer, Little Priest Tribal Colleg

    Evaluating Recruitment of American Eel, Anguilla rostrata, to the Potomac River (Spring 2006)

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    Fisheries management techniques are not often applied to American eels because basic biological information is not well known. Unknown biological parameters such as variation in growth rates and length at age have complicated stock assessment and management efforts. Though American eel are not usually considered a sport fish, their ubiquity and readiness to take a bait leads them to be caught by recreational fishermen (Collette and Klein-MacPhee, 2002). Young American eel are also used as a baitfish in coastal areas (Jenkins and 4 Burkhead, 1993.) Absence of basic population dynamics data has hampered attempts at evaluation of regional exploitation rates (Social Research for Sustainable Fisheries, 2002). Additionally, relatively few studies have addressed the recruitment of glass eels to Atlantic coast estuaries from the Sargasso Sea spawning grounds. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) adopted the Interstate Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for the American eel in November 1999. The FMP focuses on increasing the states’ efforts to collect data on American eel and the fishery it supports through both fishery dependent and fishery independent studies. To this end, member jurisdictions (including the PRFC) agreed to implement an annual abundance survey for young of year (YOY) American eels. The survey is intended to “…characterize trends in annual recruitment of young of year eels over time [to produce a] qualitative appraisal of the annual recruitment of American eel to the U.S. Atlantic coast (ASMFC, 1999). These surveys began as pilot surveys in 2000 with full implementation by the 2001 season. Survey results will provide critical data on eel coastal recruitment success and further understanding of American eel population dynamics

    Estimating Relative Abundance of Young of Year American Eel, Anguilla rostrata, in the Virginia Tributaries of Chesapeake Bay (Spring 2005)

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    The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) adopted the Interstate Fishery Management Plan (hereafter referred to as FMP) for the American eel in November 1999. The FMP focuses on increasing coastal states’ efforts to collect American eel data through both fishery dependent and fishery independent studies. Consequently, member jurisdictions (including Virginia) agreed to implement an annual survey for YOY American eels. The survey is intended to “…characterize trends in annual recruitment of the YOY eels over time [to produce a] qualitative appraisal of the annual recruitment of American eel to the U.S. Atlantic Coast” (ASMFC, 2000). The development of these surveys began in 2000 with full implementation by 2001. Survey results should provide necessary data on coastal recruitment success and further understanding of American eel population dynamics. A recent American eel stock assessment report (ASMFC, 2006) emphasized the importance of the coast-wide survey as an index of sustained recruitment over the historical coastal range and an early warning of potential range contraction of the species

    Evaluating Recruitment of American Eel, Anguilla rostrata, to the Potomac River Spring 2004

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    The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) adopted the Interstate Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for the American eel in November 1999. The FMP focuses on increasing the states’ efforts to collect data on the resource and the fishery it supports through both fishery dependent and fishery independent studies. To this end, member jurisdictions (including the PRFC) agreed to implement an annual abundance survey for young of year (YOY) American eels. The survey is intended to “…characterize trends in annual recruitment of young of year eels over time [to produce a] qualitative appraisal of the annual recruitment of American eel to the U.S. Atlantic coast (ASMFC, 2000). The development of these surveys began as pilot surveys in 2000 with full implementation by the 2001 season. Results from these surveys will provide critical data on eel coastal recruitment success and further understanding of American eel population dynamics

    Estimating Relative Abundance of Young of Year American Eel, Anguilla rostrata, in the Virginia Tributaries of Chesapeake Bay (Spring 2004 Survey)

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    The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) adopted the Interstate Fishery Management Plan (hereafter referred to as FMP) for the American eel in November 4 1999. The FMP focuses on increasing coastal states’ efforts to collect American eel data through both fishery dependent and fishery independent studies. Consequently, member jurisdictions (including Virginia) agreed to implement an annual survey for young of year (YOY) American eels. The survey is intended to “…characterize trends in annual recruitment of the young of year eels over time [to produce a] qualitative appraisal of the annual recruitment of American eel to the U.S. Atlantic Coast” (ASMFC, 2000). The development of these surveys began in 2000 with full implementation by 2001. Survey results will provide necessary data on coastal recruitment success and further the understanding of American eel population dynamics

    Estimating Relative Abundance of Young of Year American Eel, Anguilla rostrata, in the Virginia Tributaries of Chesapeake Bay. Final Report (2003 Reporting Year)

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    The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) adopted the Interstate Fishery Management Plan (hereafter referred to as FMP) for the American Eel in November 1999. The FMP focuses on increasing the state’s efforts to collect data on the resource and the fishery it supports through both fishery-dependent and fishery-independent studies. To this end, member jurisdictions (including Virginia) agreed to implement an annual abundance survey for young of year (YOY) American eels. The survey is intended to “…characterize trends in annual recruitment of the young of year eels over time [to produce a] qualitative appraisal of the annual recruitment of American eel to the U.S. Atlantic Coast (ASMFC, 2000). The development of these surveys began as pilot surveys in 2000 with full implementation by the 2001 season. Results from these surveys will provide necessary data on coastal recruitment success and further the understanding of American eel population dynamic

    A Hot Spot in Coma

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    We study the temperature structure of the central part (r<18' ~0.7 h50**-1 Mpc) of the Coma cluster of galaxies using ASCA data. Two different analysis methods produce results in good agreement with each other and reveal the presence of interesting structures in the gas temperature distribution. Globally, the average temperature in the center of the cluster is 9.0 +/- 0.6 keV in good agreement with previous results. Superimposed on this, we find a cool area with temperatures of 4-6 keV associated with a filament of X-ray emission extending southeast from the cluster center detected by Vikhlinin and coworkers. We also find a hot spot with a temperature of around 13 keV displaced north from the central peak of emission. The distribution of the gas temperatures and relative specific entropies suggests that the cool features are most likely gas stripped from a galaxy group centered on NGC 4874 falling toward the core from outside, while the hot spot located ``ahead'' of this in-falling gas is due to shock heating. Thus our results suggest that we are observing Coma during a minor merger with a small group of galaxies associated with NGC 4874 shortly before the initial core passage.Comment: 5 pages, 2 figures, accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journa
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