86,863 research outputs found

    Reducing regression test size by exclusion.

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    Operational software is constantly evolving. Regression testing is used to identify the unintended consequences of evolutionary changes. As most changes affect only a small proportion of the system, the challenge is to ensure that the regression test set is both safe (all relevant tests are used) and unclusive (only relevant tests are used). Previous approaches to reducing test sets struggle to find safe and inclusive tests by looking only at the changed code. We use decomposition program slicing to safely reduce the size of regression test sets by identifying those parts of a system that could not have been affected by a change; this information will then direct the selection of regression tests by eliminating tests that are not relevant to the change. The technique properly accounts for additions and deletions of code. We extend and use Rothermel and Harrold’s framework for measuring the safety of regression test sets and introduce new safety and precision measures that do not require a priori knowledge of the exact number of modification-revealing tests. We then analytically evaluate and compare our techniques for producing reduced regression test sets

    Reducing regression test size by exclusion.

    Get PDF
    Operational software is constantly evolving. Regression testing is used to identify the unintended consequences of evolutionary changes. As most changes affect only a small proportion of the system, the challenge is to ensure that the regression test set is both safe (all relevant tests are used) and unclusive (only relevant tests are used). Previous approaches to reducing test sets struggle to find safe and inclusive tests by looking only at the changed code. We use decomposition program slicing to safely reduce the size of regression test sets by identifying those parts of a system that could not have been affected by a change; this information will then direct the selection of regression tests by eliminating tests that are not relevant to the change. The technique properly accounts for additions and deletions of code. We extend and use Rothermel and Harrold’s framework for measuring the safety of regression test sets and introduce new safety and precision measures that do not require a priori knowledge of the exact number of modification-revealing tests. We then analytically evaluate and compare our techniques for producing reduced regression test sets

    Mineral precipitation in north slope aufeis

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    The Canning and Shaviovik river aufeis fields were studied on the ground and with aircraft data. Powdered calcium carbonate (CaCO3) patches, a few cm in thickness, were found in discrete locations on both aufeis fields. This is indicative of chemical weathering of limestone bedrock which is known to underlie much of the eastern arctic coastal plain of Alaska. Spring or river water which remains unfrozen throughout much of the winter carries CaCO3 in solution; as the river ice freezes more deeply the CaCO3 in solution is forced upwards through cracks in the river ice. Upon exposure to the cold air CaCO3 is excluded as the water freezes, forming successive layers during aufeis growth. In the melt season CaCO3, slush/powder accumulates in patches on top of the ice as the aufeis melts downward

    Utilization of remote sensing in Alaska permafrost studies

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    Permafrost related features such as: aufeis, tundra, thaw lakes and subsurface ice features were studied. LANDSAT imagery was used to measure the extent and distribution of aufeis in Arctic Slope rivers over a period of 7 years. Interannual extent of large aufeis fields was found to vary significantly. Digital LANDSAT data were used to study the short term effects of a tundra fire which burned a 48 sq km area in northwestern Alaska. Vegetation regrowth was inferred from Landsat spectral reflectance increases and compared to in-situ measurements. Aircraft SAR (Synethic Aperture Radar) imagery was used in conjunction with LANDSAT imagery used in conjunction with LANDSAT imagery to qualitatively determine depth categories for thaw lakes in northern Alaska

    Use of LANDSAT data for river and lake ice engineering studies

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    There are no author-identified significant results in this report

    Geomorphic processes on the North Slope of Alaska

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    Three physiographic provinces comprise the North Slope of Alaska: the Arctic Mountains, the Arctic Foothills and the Arctic Coastal Plain Provinces. The features and processes in the Arctic Coastal Plain, a zone of continuous permafrost, are stressed in this paper. The evidence for and mechanisms of the geomorphic cycle are discussed starting with frost cracks. Frost cracks may form polygonal ground which leads to low-centered ice wedge polygons in areas having ice-rich permafrost. As the low-centered ice wedge polygons enlarge due to thermal erosion they may evolve into thaw lakes which are largely oriented in a northwest-southeast direction on the Arctic Coastal Plain. Eventual drainage of a deep lake may result in a closed-system pingo. Evidence of the various stages of the geomorphic cycle is ubiquitous on the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain and indicates the ice content of the permafrost in some areas

    The bioarchaeology of Anglo-Saxon Yorkshire: present and future perspectives

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    The Anglo-Saxon period in Yorkshire - in terms of our knowledge of those questions which bioarchaeological studies are conventionally used to address - remains very much an unknown quantity, We can hardly claim even to know whether these questions are indeed appropriate in the Anglo-Saxon period. To some extent this reflects the nature of the Anglo-Saxon deposits so far encountered, in which preservation of the less durable organic remains has been very limited. The nature of Anglo-Saxon occupation, with a bias towards rural settlements of a kind whicb have generally left only faint traces in the ground, means that there are no deeply stratified richly organic deposits of the kind revealed in some Roman and Viking Age phases in major urban centres, of which only York is weIl known in the region. The Anglo-Saxon period thus presents exceptional challenges to the environmental archaeologist, and ones which closely parallel those for the Iron Age. It is a period for which the kind of assemblages traditionally provided by bioarchaeologica1 studies are most urgently needed, to define environment and land use, resource exploitation, living conditions, trade and exchange, as well as aspects of craft-working and industrial activities. In addition, the period in Yorkshire presents special problems concerning the status of individual rural or ecclesiastical settlements, particularly the nature of York as a possible wic. For the purposes of this paper (and in view of the complexities of the archaeology of the 5th to 11th centuries), we have elected to discuss only such biological material as .falls after the end of the Roman period (as generally accepted) and before the first significant waves of Scandinavian invasion in the mid 9th century
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