8,510 research outputs found

    The moderating effect of brand orientation on inter-firm market orientation and performance

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    While prior research has shown that market and brand orientation are key contributors to successful business performance, research to date has not fully explored how inter firm collaboration for these two key orientations can enhance business performance. The purpose of the paper is to investigate the relationship between inter-firm market and performance; to test for the moderating role of brand orientation in that relationship. A total of 169 completed pairs of surveys were collected of small and medium enterprises operating internationally in a variety of industries in Switzerland. The results show that inter-firm market and brand orientation are two antecedents of marketing and financial performance. The impact of inter-firm market on marketing and financial performance is significant when the brand orientation is favorable. This study extends previous research by examining the moderating role of brand orientation on inter firm market orientation, which is important, especially for firms wanting to increase their brand reputation by entering into partnerships with other firms. Further research is indicated, to identify the key moderators of the driving force of inter-firm market in relation to business performance and the reason why maintaining a strong brand presence is important in the international marketplace

    Perceptions of knowledge sharing among small family firm leaders: a structural equation model

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    Small family firms have many unique relational qualities with implications for how knowledge is passed between individuals. Extant literature posits leadership approach as important in explaining differences in knowledge-sharing climate from one firm to another. This study investigates how leadership approaches interact with family influence to inform perceptions of knowledge sharing. We utilize survey data (n = 110) from owner-managers of knowledge-intensive small family firms in Scotland. Our findings present a choice in leadership intention, contrasting organization-focused participation against family-influenced guidance. Insight is offered on the implications of this leadership choice at both organizational and familial level

    Green supply chain management – food for thought?

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    This paper investigates the impact of green supply chain management (GSCM) practices on the performance of UK food retail small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). A quantitative approach using a non-probability sampling of 84 participants was employed. Based on the literature review, five hypotheses were developed and tested using the partial least square-structural equation modeling (SEM-Smart PLS 2.03) approach. The reviewed literature revealed that key internal drivers (ID) and external pressures (EP) stimulate organizations to initiate GSCM practices in UK food retail SMEs. Though empirical findings strongly supported the statement that ID influence GSCM practices, they did not show a significant relationship between EP and GSCM practices. Literature also suggests that practicing GSCM can help improve the efficiency, brand image (BI) and profitability, and thus improve the overall firm performance which is also empirically proved. This study helps enrich existing theories on SCM and organizational performance. As to practical impact, this study should facilitate SMEs in GSCM practices and thus help green the economy. While the findings of this study have limited generalisability as the data were collected from UK SMEs only and the sample size was comparatively small, this research establishes a foundation for further study in this domain

    Towards a unified theory of brand equity: conceptualizations, taxonomy and avenues for future research

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    This paper aims to look into contemporary thinking within the brand equity paradigm, with a view to establishing avenues for further research on the drivers of brand equity formation, enabling a more in-depth understanding of the antecedents of brand equity and its determinants, as well as the development of an improved instrument to measure brand equity. We develop the relating conceptual study through differentiation and integration as a specific conceptual goal. We present a taxonomic framework of brand equity grounded on a synthesis of contemporary approaches to the theme. In so doing we identify gaps in the brand equity literature, which we hope will serve as beacons for future research and provide valuable theoretical insights on the determinants of brand equity formation and the development of better brand equity measurement tools. We argue that the unifying brand equity theory should be based on three pillars: stakeholder value, marketing assets and brand financial performance outputs.info:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersio

    Marketing Research in the 21st Century: Opportunities and Challenges

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    The role of marketing is evolving rapidly, and design and analysis methods used by marketing researchers are also changing. These changes are emerging from transformations in management skills, technological innovations, and continuously evolving customer behavior. But perhaps the most substantial driver of these changes is the emergence of big data and the analytical methods used to examine and understand the data. To continue being relevant, marketing research must remain as dynamic as the markets themselves and adapt accordingly to the following: Data will continue increasing exponentially; data quality will improve; analytics will be more powerful, easier to use, and more widely used; management and customer decisions will increasingly be knowledge-based; privacy issues and challenges will be both a problem and an opportunity as organizations develop their analytics skills; data analytics will become firmly established as a competitive advantage, both in the marketing research industry and in academics; and for the foreseeable future, the demand for highly trained data scientists will exceed the supply

    Projected Images of Major Chinese Outbound Destinations

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    This study aimed to explore the projected images of major outbound destinations based on popular travel magazines in China. Travel articles on Hong Kong, Macau, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam and Taiwan from 2006 to 2008 were content analyzed. Japan was reported on most, and the projected images of the six destinations are dominated by leisure and recreation, and culture, history and art. Correspondence analysis was used to examine relationships between destinations and popular image attributes. The results showed that South Korea and Macau had distinct projected images, whereas Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Vietnam shared many similar image attributes. Practical implications for destination marketing organizations are provided

    Social Influence, Risk and Benefit Perceptions, and the Acceptability of Risky Energy Technologies:An Explanatory Model of Nuclear Power Versus Shale Gas

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    Risky energy technologies are often controversial and debates around them are polarized; in such debates public acceptability is key. Research on public acceptability has emphasized the importance of intrapersonal factors but has largely neglected the influence of interpersonal factors. In an online survey (N = 948) with a representative sample of the United Kingdom, we therefore integrate interpersonal factors (i.e., social influence as measured by social networks) with two risky energy technologies that differ in familiarity (nuclear power vs. shale gas) to examine how these factors explain risk and benefit perceptions and public acceptability. Findings show that benefit perceptions are key in explaining acceptability judgments. However, risk perceptions are more important when people are less familiar with the energy technology. Social network factors affect perceived risks and benefits associated with risky energy technology, hereby indirectly helping to form one's acceptability judgment toward the technology. This effect seems to be present regardless of the perceived familiarity with the energy technology. By integrating interpersonal with intrapersonal factors in an explanatory model, we show how the current "risk-benefit acceptability" model used in risk research can be further developed to advance the current understanding of acceptability formation

    Growing Two-Sided Networks by Advertising the User Base: A Field Experiment

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    Two-sided exchange networks (such as eBay.com) often advertise their number of users, presumably to encourage further participation. However, these networks differ markedly on how they advertise their user base. Some highlight the number of sellers, some emphasize the number of buyers, and others disclose both. We use field experiment data from a business-to-business website to examine the efficacy of these different display formats. Before each potential seller posted a listing, the website randomized whether to display the number of buyers and/or sellers, and if so, how many buyers and/or sellers to claim. We find that when information about both buyers and sellers is displayed, a large number of sellers deters further seller listings. However, this deterrence effect disappears when only the number of sellers is presented. Similarly, a large number of buyers is more likely to attract new listings when it is displayed together with the number of sellers. These results suggest the presence of indirect network externalities, whereby a seller prefers markets with many other sellers because they help attract more buyers

    Attitudinal Determinants of Aberrant Driving Behaviors in Pakistan

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    The aberrant behavior of drivers is regarded as the most significant contributory factor to traffic accidents in Pakistan. This research was conducted on the premise that personal attitudes were key determinants of driving behaviors. Consequently, the research attempted to identify the key sociocognitive determinants of aberrant driving. To do this, a quantitative study that used an attitudinal questionnaire (inspired by the theory of planned behavior and a modified driver behavior questionnaire) was conducted in the city of Lahore, Pakistan. The study obtained self-reports of attitudes, norms, perceived control, and opinions of drivers regarding a number of intentional road traffic violations and enforcement. The responses to the statements in the questionnaires were first factor analyzed to identify underlying attitudinal and behavioral constructs. Later, following a cluster analysis technique, the attitudinal constructs were used to classify drivers into four distinct groups: the autonomous, the opportunists, the regulators, and the risk averse. Sociodemographic characteristics and behavioral constructs of these groups were also studied. The results indicated that the behaviors of drivers could be interpreted in relation to their attitudes and were partly influenced by the drivers’ sociodemographic characteristics. Attitudes toward enforcement and compliance with rules specifically appeared to be the strongest determinants of Pakistani drivers’ behavior. In particular, the results indicate that being affluent, female, and a student negatively influenced driving behaviors
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