13 research outputs found

    The wide-field, multiplexed, spectroscopic facility WEAVE : survey design, overview, and simulated implementation

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    Funding for the WEAVE facility has been provided by UKRI STFC, the University of Oxford, NOVA, NWO, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), the Isaac Newton Group partners (STFC, NWO, and Spain, led by the IAC), INAF, CNRS-INSU, the Observatoire de Paris, Région Île-de-France, CONCYT through INAOE, Konkoly Observatory (CSFK), Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA Heidelberg), Lund University, the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), the Swedish Research Council, the European Commission, and the University of Pennsylvania.WEAVE, the new wide-field, massively multiplexed spectroscopic survey facility for the William Herschel Telescope, will see first light in late 2022. WEAVE comprises a new 2-degree field-of-view prime-focus corrector system, a nearly 1000-multiplex fibre positioner, 20 individually deployable 'mini' integral field units (IFUs), and a single large IFU. These fibre systems feed a dual-beam spectrograph covering the wavelength range 366-959 nm at R ∼ 5000, or two shorter ranges at R ∼ 20,000. After summarising the design and implementation of WEAVE and its data systems, we present the organisation, science drivers and design of a five- to seven-year programme of eight individual surveys to: (i) study our Galaxy's origins by completing Gaia's phase-space information, providing metallicities to its limiting magnitude for ∼ 3 million stars and detailed abundances for ∼ 1.5 million brighter field and open-cluster stars; (ii) survey ∼ 0.4 million Galactic-plane OBA stars, young stellar objects and nearby gas to understand the evolution of young stars and their environments; (iii) perform an extensive spectral survey of white dwarfs; (iv) survey  ∼ 400 neutral-hydrogen-selected galaxies with the IFUs; (v) study properties and kinematics of stellar populations and ionised gas in z 1 million spectra of LOFAR-selected radio sources; (viii) trace structures using intergalactic/circumgalactic gas at z > 2. Finally, we describe the WEAVE Operational Rehearsals using the WEAVE Simulator.PostprintPeer reviewe

    The wide-field, multiplexed, spectroscopic facility WEAVE: Survey design, overview, and simulated implementation

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    WEAVE, the new wide-field, massively multiplexed spectroscopic survey facility for the William Herschel Telescope, will see first light in late 2022. WEAVE comprises a new 2-degree field-of-view prime-focus corrector system, a nearly 1000-multiplex fibre positioner, 20 individually deployable 'mini' integral field units (IFUs), and a single large IFU. These fibre systems feed a dual-beam spectrograph covering the wavelength range 366−-959\,nm at R∼5000R\sim5000, or two shorter ranges at R∼20 000R\sim20\,000. After summarising the design and implementation of WEAVE and its data systems, we present the organisation, science drivers and design of a five- to seven-year programme of eight individual surveys to: (i) study our Galaxy's origins by completing Gaia's phase-space information, providing metallicities to its limiting magnitude for ∼\sim3 million stars and detailed abundances for ∼1.5\sim1.5 million brighter field and open-cluster stars; (ii) survey ∼0.4\sim0.4 million Galactic-plane OBA stars, young stellar objects and nearby gas to understand the evolution of young stars and their environments; (iii) perform an extensive spectral survey of white dwarfs; (iv) survey ∼400\sim400 neutral-hydrogen-selected galaxies with the IFUs; (v) study properties and kinematics of stellar populations and ionised gas in z<0.5z<0.5 cluster galaxies; (vi) survey stellar populations and kinematics in ∼25 000\sim25\,000 field galaxies at 0.3≲z≲0.70.3\lesssim z \lesssim 0.7; (vii) study the cosmic evolution of accretion and star formation using >1>1 million spectra of LOFAR-selected radio sources; (viii) trace structures using intergalactic/circumgalactic gas at z>2z>2. Finally, we describe the WEAVE Operational Rehearsals using the WEAVE Simulator.Comment: 41 pages, 27 figures, accepted for publication by MNRA

    The wide-field, multiplexed, spectroscopic facility WEAVE: Survey design, overview, and simulated implementation

    Get PDF
    WEAVE, the new wide-field, massively multiplexed spectroscopic survey facility for the William Herschel Telescope, will see first light in late 2022. WEAVE comprises a new 2-degree field-of-view prime-focus corrector system, a nearly 1000-multiplex fibre positioner, 20 individually deployable 'mini' integral field units (IFUs), and a single large IFU. These fibre systems feed a dual-beam spectrograph covering the wavelength range 366−959\,nm at R∼5000, or two shorter ranges at R∼20000. After summarising the design and implementation of WEAVE and its data systems, we present the organisation, science drivers and design of a five- to seven-year programme of eight individual surveys to: (i) study our Galaxy's origins by completing Gaia's phase-space information, providing metallicities to its limiting magnitude for ∼3 million stars and detailed abundances for ∼1.5 million brighter field and open-cluster stars; (ii) survey ∼0.4 million Galactic-plane OBA stars, young stellar objects and nearby gas to understand the evolution of young stars and their environments; (iii) perform an extensive spectral survey of white dwarfs; (iv) survey ∼400 neutral-hydrogen-selected galaxies with the IFUs; (v) study properties and kinematics of stellar populations and ionised gas in z1 million spectra of LOFAR-selected radio sources; (viii) trace structures using intergalactic/circumgalactic gas at z>2. Finally, we describe the WEAVE Operational Rehearsals using the WEAVE Simulator

    The Lifecycle of a Neural Network in the Wild: A Multiple Instance Learning Study on Cancer Detection from Breast Biopsies Imaged with Novel Technique

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    International audienceIn the context of tissue examination for breast cancer assessment, we propose a label-free imaging based on Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) signal combined with a multiple instance learning (MIL) model to respond to a critical need for fast at point-of-care diagnosis: biopsy or surgery time. This new imaging, Dynamic Cell Imaging (DCI), is the time-resolved variant of Full-Field OCT (FFOCT) and offers an intra-cellular resolution of about 1 micron, together with optical sectioning and an improved cell contrast. In order to tackle the challenges of limited data and annotations, while remaining in the scope of interpretability, we design an instance-level MIL model with a focus on adapted data sampling. The interest of this method is that it incorporates taskspecific feature learning and also produces instance predictions. For a dataset of 150 core-needle biopsies, we achieve a considerable improvement of more than 20 percentage points in specificity and about 10 in accuracy by leveraging intradomain (as compared to extra-domain) pre-training

    Full-field optical coherence tomography: novel imaging technique for extemporaneous high-resolution analysis of mucosal architecture in human gut biopsies

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    International audienceFull-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) is an imaging technique of biological tissue based on tissue light reflectance analysis. We evaluated the feasibility of imaging fresh digestive mucosal biopsies after a quick mounting procedure (5 min) using two distinct modalities of FFOCT. In static FFOCT mode, we gained high-resolution images of general gut tissue-specific architecture, such as oesophageal papillae, gastric pits, duodenal villi and colonic crypts. In dynamic FFOCT mode, we imaged individual epithelial cells of the mucosal lining with a cellular or subcellular resolution and identified cellular components of the lamina propria. FFOCT represents a promising dye-free imaging tool for on-site analysis of gut tissue remodelling

    Automatic diagnosis and biopsy classification with dynamic Full-Field OCT and machine learning

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    Abstract The adoption of emerging imaging technologies in the medical community is often hampered if they provide a new unfamiliar contrast that requires experience to be interpreted. Here, in order to facilitate such integration, we developed two complementary machine learning approaches, respectively based on feature engineering and on convolutional neural networks (CNN), to perform automatic diagnosis of breast biopsies using dynamic full field optical coherence tomography (D-FF-OCT) microscopy. This new technique provides fast, high resolution images of biopsies with a contrast similar to H&E histology, but without any tissue preparation and alteration. We conducted a pilot study on 51 breast biopsies, and more than 1,000 individual images, and performed standard histology to obtain each biopsy diagnosis. Using our automatic diagnosis algorithms, we obtained an accuracy above 88% at the image level, and above 96% at the biopsy level. Finally, we proposed different strategies to narrow down the spatial scale of the automatic segmentation in order to be able to draw the tumor margins by drawing attention maps with the CNN approach, or by performing high resolution precise annotation of the datasets. Altogether, these results demonstrate the high potential of D-FF-OCT coupled to machine learning to provide a rapid, automatic, and accurate histopathology diagnosis

    The wide-field, multiplexed, spectroscopic facility WEAVE: Survey design, overview, and simulated implementation

    No full text
    International audienceWEAVE, the new wide-field, massively multiplexed spectroscopic survey facility for the William Herschel Telescope, will see first light in late 2022. WEAVE comprises a new 2-degree field-of-view prime-focus corrector system, a nearly 1000-multiplex fibre positioner, 20 individually deployable 'mini' integral field units (IFUs), and a single large IFU. These fibre systems feed a dual-beam spectrograph covering the wavelength range 366-959 nm at R ~ 5000, or two shorter ranges at R ~ 20 000. After summarising the design and implementation of WEAVE and its data systems, we present the organisation, science drivers and design of a five- to seven-year programme of eight individual surveys to: (i) study our Galaxy's origins by completing Gaia's phase-space information, providing metallicities to its limiting magnitude for ~3 million stars and detailed abundances for ~1.5 million brighter field and open-cluster stars; (ii) survey ~0.4 million Galactic-plane OBA stars, young stellar objects and nearby gas to understand the evolution of young stars and their environments; (iii) perform an extensive spectral survey of white dwarfs; (iv) survey ~400 neutral-hydrogen-selected galaxies with the IFUs; (v) study properties and kinematics of stellar populations and ionised gas in z 1 million spectra of LOFAR-selected radio sources; (viii) trace structures using intergalactic/circumgalactic gas at z > 2. Finally, we describe the WEAVE Operational Rehearsals using the WEAVE Simulator
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