5,258 research outputs found

    Weed control strategies in organically grown carrots

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    This paper outlines a study to integrate elements of cultural, thermal and mechanical control methods in the production of late maincrop drilled organic carrots. Agronomic and economic findings are discusse

    Horticultural weed control in organic systems – a modelling approach

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    This report was presented at the UK Organic Research 2002 Conference. Weed control is an important yet mainly unaddressed research issue in organic systems. At present there is little agronomic support to underpin weed management decisions. Computer modelling and simulation techniques may provide a valuable tool for understanding the nature and processes of the organic system thus generating knowledge and information of direct benefit to growers, which will aid in short and long term weed management strategies

    Engineering needs environmental and global thinkers: a contextual analysis of student learning preferences

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    The need for engineering graduates who are environmentally and globally aware is now a recognised priority in professional practice. This paper presents an analysis of learning preferences of entry level students in a course which builds an early awareness of global environmental practice. The course on Engineering and the Environment started in 1991 as part of the undergraduate Environmental Engineering program at RMIT University. Subsequently the course was extended to Geological and then to Civil Engineering programs. The curriculum has paralleled the development of environmental practice in the professions of engineering and mining and provides a fundamental environmental context for students' subsequent learning in their programs and on-going professional practice. Curriculum development and some specific learning activities are briefly outlined. A challenge has been how to engage a diverse and increasingly large cohort of almost several hundred students in "non traditional" engineering lectures. A detailed analysis of student responses to a set of multiple choice exam questions has been conducted to test the hypothesis that various factors such as student choice of program may influence receptivity to different modes of learning and curriculum content. The study shows no significant difference between the various groups in regards to preference for evaluative type environmental learning, versus more traditional factual based engineering learning

    Enabling Personalized Composition and Adaptive Provisioning of Web Services

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    The proliferation of interconnected computing devices is fostering the emergence of environments where Web services made available to mobile users are a commodity. Unfortunately, inherent limitations of mobile devices still hinder the seamless access to Web services, and their use in supporting complex user activities. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a distributed, adaptive, and context-aware framework for personalized service composition and provisioning adapted to mobile users. Users specify their preferences by annotating existing process templates, leading to personalized service-based processes. To cater for the possibility of low bandwidth communication channels and frequent disconnections, an execution model is proposed whereby the responsibility of orchestrating personalized processes is spread across the participating services and user agents. In addition, the execution model is adaptive in the sense that the runtime environment is able to detect exceptions and react to them according to a set of rules

    A review of the generic design assessment (GDA) dialogue pilot (2015) for new nuclear build in the UK: lessons for engagement theory and practice.

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    We have discussed previously that a community led, asset based approach is required to achieve any sense of how social sustainability can be defined in a community setting within the context of energy developments. Our approach aims to initiate a lasting change within ‘energy’ communities through building social capital; focusing on community assets not deficits to define their social priorities. Through deliberation, we develop an understanding of social sustainability so that a community is well placed to enter discussions with government and industry regarding large energy developments that will directly affect them. We review the 2015 Generic Design Assessment (GDA) Public Dialogue Pilot process for potential new nuclear reactors in the UK. We examine the aims of the dialogue, giving particular attention to a comparison between the national sampling of citizens for the GDA and the local community, deliberative approach we have proposed previously. We find an ongoing tension between ‘national’ engagement processes (such as the GDA Public Dialogue Pilot process) and the specific requirements of those energy communities that live adjacent or close to energy infrastructure, manifested here by a conflict between the requirements of the convenor and those of participants regarding priority issues for discussion. We also reveal a paradox; despite participant preference for a remote, internet-based engagement process, they agreed that face to face contact is a priority to encourage trust building between participants and the convenor of the process – a desired outcome of the process. The GDA Public Dialogue Pilot process has demonstrated that stakeholders are willing to engage with and be more directly involved in local energy-related decisions that affect them directly, provided there is opportunity to discuss locally-relevant and site-specific issues in addition to those of a broader nature. There exists a disparity and conflict between ‘national’ engagement processes and the ‘local’ priorities of those energy communities that are adjacent or close to energy infrastructure. In this process and others, we have seen an imbalance between the requirements of the convenor and those of participants regarding priority issues for discussion. This continues to be a persistent challenge for those convening stakeholder engagement events where the scope and context is not primarily site-specific. However, it is encouraging that convenors and participants alike continue to be willing to work towards resolving this

    Ancient Map of Asia Minor

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    The Indian Ocean tsunami: socio-economic impacts in Thailand

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    On the morning of 26 December 2004 large areas of coastal southern Thailand were transformed when a tsunami, generated by a powerful submarine earthquake in the Indian Ocean, swept ashore. Officially, there were 5395 confirmed deaths in Thailand with another 2932 people listed as missing. In February 2005 a team led by Dr Ben Horton of the University of Pennsylvania was awarded an SGER grant by the National Science Foundation to undertake exploratory research on the tsunami in Malaysia and Thailand. This report summarizes the preliminary conclusions of the social science element of the Thai fieldwork. The team undertook fieldwork in three main sites during July 2005: Koh Lanta, Koh Phi Phi and Khao Lak. We chose Koh Phi Phi as a small, tourist (backpacker)-oriented island economy with high levels of damage and casualties; Koh Lanta as a site with a significant population of fisherfolk with a long presence in the area; and Khao Lak as a mainland site with the highest number of casualties in Thailand and with a mixed tourism-fishing economy
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