7 research outputs found

    The need for robust critique of arts and health research: young people, art therapy and mental health

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    We describe work in progress to conduct a systematic review of research on effects of arts-based programs for mental health in young people. We are at the stage of searching for relevant studies through major databases and screening extant systematic reviews for additional research which meet our inclusion criteria. At this stage, however, concerns have arisen regarding both the quality of existing primary studies and of recently published systematic reviews in this area of arts and health. As a case in point, in this paper we focus on one research report on art therapy with adolescent girls and its inclusion in three systematic reviews. We demonstrate that the reviews fail to undertake a robust critique of the Bazargan and Pakdaman paper and that the paper and reviews are flawed. Drawing on recent criticisms of systematic reviewing, we consider the value of proceeding with our systematic review as initially planned. [Abstract copyright: Copyright © 2022 Grebosz-Haring, Thun-Hohenstein, Schuchter-Wiegand, Irons, Bathke, Phillips and Clift.

    The Need for Robust Critique of Arts and Health Research: Young People, Art Therapy and Mental Health

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    We describe work in progress to conduct a systematic review of research on effects of arts-based programs for mental health in young people. We are at the stage of searching for relevant studies through major databases and screening extant systematic reviews for additional research which meet our inclusion criteria. At this stage, however, concerns have arisen regarding both the quality of existing primary studies and of recently published systematic reviews in this area of arts and health. As a case in point, in this paper we focus on one research report on art therapy with adolescent girls and its inclusion in three systematic reviews. We demonstrate that the reviews fail to undertake a robust critique of the Bazargan and Pakdaman paper and that the paper and reviews are flawed. Drawing on recent criticisms of systematic reviewing, we consider the value of proceeding with our systematic review as initially planned

    Effects of group singing versus group music listening on hospitalized children and adolescents with mental disorders: A pilot study

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    Background: There is an emerging view that music-related interventions (MuRI) may play an important role for youth with mental disorders. Here, we assessed the potential neuroendocrine (cortisol), immune (IgA) and psychological (mood state, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), well-being) efficacy of a brief program of MuRI (group singing versus group music listening) in children and adolescents with mental disorders in a clinical setting. Methods: We performed this observational pilot study with 17 patients (aged 11–18; 11 female) admitted to the Department for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/PMU Salzburg, Austria between March 2015 and April 2016. Patients participated in either a singing program or a music listening program, delivered through five daily, consecutive 45-minute sessions in one week. Outcomes: Saliva samples for cortisol and IgA, and subjective measures of mood were taken daily, pre- and post-MuRI. HRQOL and well-being were measured pre- and post-5-day-program of MuRI. The program in singing led to a significantly larger mean drop in cortisol than in music listening (mean difference: −0·32; 95% CI −0·57 to −0·07), while listening led to a significantly higher mean positive change in the dimension calmness (mean difference: −2·66, 95%CI −4·99 to −0·33) than singing. Moreover, singing was associated with an improvement in HRQOL, and listening with an improvement in well-being. Interpretation: Our preliminary findings suggest that MuRI may provide benefits for children and adolescents with mental disorders. The differences in psychobiological responses to singing and music listening invite further investigations. A larger, suitably powered study is now needed to provide a precise estimate of the effects of MuRI for mental health promotion, both on psychological and biological experiences. Funding: Salzburg Festival, Austria, and Focus Area ‘Science and Art’, Salzburg, Austria

    Supplementary Material, Supplementary_Material – Contemporary art music and its audiences: Age, gender, and social class profile

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    <p>Supplementary Material, Supplementary_Material for Contemporary art music and its audiences: Age, gender, and social class profile by Katarzyna Grebosz-Haring and Martin Weichbold in Musicae Scientiae</p

    The need for robust critique of arts and health research: the treatment of the Gene Cohen et al. (2006) paper on singing, wellbeing and health in subsequent evidence reviews

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    Background This paper considers weaknesses in a study by Cohen et al. (2006) on the impacts of community singing on health. These include high demand characteristics, lack of attention to attrition, flawed statistical analysis, and measurement. Nevertheless, the study is uncritically cited, in evidence reviews, with findings taken at face value. Methods Google Scholar, SCOPUS and BASE citation functions for Cohen et al. identified 32 evidence reviews in peer-reviewed journals. Eleven of these reviews, published between 2010 and 2023, focused on creative arts interventions. Results We demonstrate limitations in the Cohen et al. research which undermine the conclusions they reach regarding the health benefits of group singing. Subsequent evidence reviews take the findings at face value and offer little critical commentary. Discussion We consider what is needed to improve evidence reviews in the field of creative arts and health research. Conclusions A more robust approach is needed in reviewing research evidence in the field of arts and health. The Cohen et al. paper is not suitable for inclusion in future evidence review

    Culture for Health?

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    A new EU report – Culture for Health – reviews cultural interventions in health and wellbeing and makes policy recommendations. But a group of academics led by Stephen Clift has serious concerns about its credibility
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