1,507 research outputs found

    Weather and Climate Information for Tourism

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    The tourism sector is one of the largest and fastest growing global industries and is a significant contributor to national and local economies around the world. The interface between climate and tourism is multifaceted and complex, as climate represents both a vital resource to be exploited and an important limiting factor that poses risks to be managed by the tourism industry and tourists alike. All tourism destinations and operators are climate-sensitive to a degree and climate is a key influence on travel planning and the travel experience. This chapter provides a synopsis of the capacities and needs for climate services in the tourism sector, including current and emerging applications of climate services by diverse tourism end-users, and a discussion of key knowledge gaps, research and capacity-building needs and partnerships that are required to accelerate the application of climate information to manage risks to climate variability and facilitate successful adaptation to climate change

    Food insecurity in adults with severe mental illness living in Northern England: Peer research interview findings

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    Food insecurity means that a person does not have access to sufficient nutritiousfood for normal growth and health. Food insecurity can lead to many healthproblems such as obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and other long term healthconditions. People living with a severe mental illness are more likely to experiencefood insecurity than people without mental illness. Peer-ledin-depthinterviewswere conducted with adults with severe mental illness from Northern England,during which their experiences of food insecurity and strategies to tackle foodinsecurity were discussed. Interviews took place between March and December2022, with interviews being transcribed and analysed using deductive andinductive thematic analysis. Thirteen interviews were conducted, finding that foodinsecurity in adults with severe mental illness was often a long-standingissue.Unemployment, the cost-of-livingcrisis and fuel poverty impacted on experiencesof food insecurity. Difficulties accessing food banks such as transport, stigma,and the limited selection of available food was also discussed. Strategies to tacklefood insecurity centred on making food banks more accessible and improving thequality of available food. Future research should aim to eradicate food insecurityfor adults with severe mental illness, as limited research and action focuses onthis population group over and above ‘mental illness’ or ‘poor mental health’.Removing barriers to accessing food such as lack of transport, and providing foodwhich is of adequate nutritional quality, should be prioritised, as well as tacklingthe stigma and accessibility issues surrounding food banks use

    Food insecurity in adults with severe mental illness living in Northern England: Peer research interview findings

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    \ua9 2023 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.Food insecurity means that a person does not have access to sufficient nutritious food for normal growth and health. Food insecurity can lead to many health problems such as obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and other long term health conditions. People living with a severe mental illness are more likely to experience food insecurity than people without mental illness. Peer-led in-depth interviews were conducted with adults with severe mental illness from Northern England, during which their experiences of food insecurity and strategies to tackle food insecurity were discussed. Interviews took place between March and December 2022, with interviews being transcribed and analysed using deductive and inductive thematic analysis. Thirteen interviews were conducted, finding that food insecurity in adults with severe mental illness was often a long-standing issue. Unemployment, the cost-of-living crisis and fuel poverty impacted on experiences of food insecurity. Difficulties accessing food banks such as transport, stigma, and the limited selection of available food was also discussed. Strategies to tackle food insecurity centred on making food banks more accessible and improving the quality of available food. Future research should aim to eradicate food insecurity for adults with severe mental illness, as limited research and action focuses on this population group over and above ‘mental illness’ or ‘poor mental health’. Removing barriers to accessing food such as lack of transport, and providing food which is of adequate nutritional quality, should be prioritised, as well as tackling the stigma and accessibility issues surrounding food banks use

    Use of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography to guide management of patients with coronary disease

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    Background In a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, 4,146 patients were randomized to receive standard care or standard care plus coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Objectives The purpose of this study was to explore the consequences of CCTA-assisted diagnosis on invasive coronary angiography, preventive treatments, and clinical outcomes. Methods In post hoc analyses, we assessed changes in invasive coronary angiography, preventive treatments, and clinical outcomes using national electronic health records. Results Despite similar overall rates (409 vs. 401; p = 0.451), invasive angiography was less likely to demonstrate normal coronary arteries (20 vs. 56; hazard ratios [HRs]: 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.23 to 0.68]; p < 0.001) but more likely to show obstructive coronary artery disease (283 vs. 230; HR: 1.29 [95% CI: 1.08 to 1.55]; p = 0.005) in those allocated to CCTA. More preventive therapies (283 vs. 74; HR: 4.03 [95% CI: 3.12 to 5.20]; p < 0.001) were initiated after CCTA, with each drug commencing at a median of 48 to 52 days after clinic attendance. From the median time for preventive therapy initiation (50 days), fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction was halved in patients allocated to CCTA compared with those assigned to standard care (17 vs. 34; HR: 0.50 [95% CI: 0.28 to 0.88]; p = 0.020). Cumulative 6-month costs were slightly higher with CCTA: difference 462(95462 (95% CI: 303 to $621). Conclusions In patients with suspected angina due to coronary heart disease, CCTA leads to more appropriate use of invasive angiography and alterations in preventive therapies that were associated with a halving of fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction. (Scottish COmputed Tomography of the HEART Trial [SCOT-HEART]; NCT01149590

    Food insecurity in adults with severe mental illness living in Northern England: A co-produced cross-sectional study

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    \ua9 2024 The Authors. Nutrition &amp; Dietetics published by John Wiley &amp; Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Dietitians Australia.Aim: This study aimed to explore food insecurity prevalence and experiences of adults with severe mental illness living in Northern England. Methods: This mixed-methods cross-sectional study took place between March and October 2022. Participants were adults with self-reported severe mental illness living in Northern England. The survey included demographic, health, and financial questions. Food insecurity was measured using the US Department of Agriculture Adult Food Security measure. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression; and qualitative data using content analysis. Results: In total, 135 participants completed the survey, with a mean age of 44.7 years (SD: 14.1, range: 18–75 years). Participants were predominantly male (53.3%), white (88%) and from Yorkshire (50.4%). The food insecurity prevalence was 50.4% (n = 68). There was statistical significance in food insecurity status by region (p = 0.001); impacts of severe mental illness on activities of daily living (p = 0.02); and the Covid pandemic on food access (p &lt; 0.001). The North West had the highest prevalence of food insecurity (73.3%); followed by the Humber and North East regions (66.7%); and Yorkshire (33.8%). In multivariable binary logistic regression, severe mental illness\u27 impact on daily living was the only predictive variable for food insecurity (odds ratio = 4.618, 95% confidence interval: 1.071–19.924, p = 0.04). Conclusion: The prevalence of food insecurity in this study is higher than is reported in similar studies (41%). Mental health practitioners should routinely assess and monitor food insecurity in people living with severe mental illness. Further research should focus on food insecurity interventions in this population

    The Soft Power of Anglia: British Cold War Cultural Diplomacy in the USSR

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    This article contributes to the growing literature on the cultural Cold War through an exploration of the British national projection magazine Anglia, produced by the Foreign Office for distribution in the USSR from 1962 to 1992. As well as drawing attention to the significance of national magazines in general, the article sheds light on Britain's distinctive approach to propaganda and cultural diplomacy during the Cold War. It considers why the magazine was set up and endured for so long, despite considerable reservations about its value. It examines how Britain was projected in a manner that accorded with British understandings about the need for ‘subtle’ propaganda. Finally, it addresses the question of the magazine's impact in the USSR

    A Deletion in the Canine POMC Gene Is Associated with Weight and Appetite in Obesity-Prone Labrador Retriever Dogs.

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    Sequencing of candidate genes for obesity in Labrador retriever dogs identified a 14 bp deletion in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) with an allele frequency of 12%. The deletion disrupts the β-MSH and β-endorphin coding sequences and is associated with body weight (per allele effect of 0.33 SD), adiposity, and greater food motivation. Among other dog breeds, the deletion was only found in the closely related flat-coat retriever (FCR), where it is similarly associated with body weight and food motivation. The mutation is significantly more common in Labrador retrievers selected to become assistance dogs than pets. In conclusion, the deletion in POMC is a significant modifier of weight and appetite in Labrador retrievers and FCRs and may influence other behavioral traits.We are grateful to Rachel Moxon of Guide Dogs UK for collecting the assistance dog samples; Stephen J Sharp of the MRC Epidemiology Unit for his statistical advice; Jens Häggström, Karin Hultin Jäderlund and Berndt Klingeborn for the Swedish dog samples; Anne White for efforts to develop a canine beta MSH assay and adaptation of her original for figure 1b; and the Dogslife Consortium for samples from British Labrador retrievers (supported by an Institute Core Strategic Grant from the BBSRC to the Roslin Institute). A full list of the investigators who contributed to the Dogslife project is available from www.dogslife.ac.uk/who-runs-dogslife. AJG's academic post at the University of Liverpool is financially supported by Royal Canin. The work was primarily supported by the Wellcome Trust (Senior Investigator Award 095515/Z/11/Z and Strategic Award 100574/Z/12/Z), MRC (MRC Metabolic Diseases Unit, award 4050281695 and MRC_MC_UU_12012/5), and Dogs Trust. The authors would like to thank all the veterinary surgeons and nurses, owners and dogs who contributed samples.This is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Elsevier via https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2016.04.01
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