8,411 research outputs found

    Teaching Creative Writing Online: Research-Informed Strategies

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    This article is a short summary of a conference presentation given online for the NAWE Conference, Spring 2021. It suggests some different ways of teaching creative writing online, using puppets, stories, drawings and metacognition

    8 Ways To Teach spelling, punctuation and grammar

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    For many English teachers, teaching Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar (SPaG) is daunting. The stakes have always been high: if your pupils are not good spellers, struggle to punctuate correctly and have a tendency to use non-standard forms in their writing, then invariably they won’t achieve highly, particularly in exams. Since the beginning of this decade, the stakes ramped up another notch with Conservative Education Secretaries and ministers imposing SPaG tests on primary schools and insisting on more weighting on SPAG in GCSE and A-Level English/English Literature exams. This has raised anxieties considerably. This article aims to provide some tried and tested ways to diffuse some of these worries, drawing together the best research and practice

    The Haunted House: Teaching Creative Writing Through Collaborative Learning to 9-13 year olds

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    Many teachers of creative writing find teaching the 9-13-year-old age group tricky for a few reasons. These children are usually in a time of radical transition: getting ready to move into a new school, or starting in a new one. They are still, in my experience as a teacher and parent, children who want to be grown up but aren’t ready for the fully adult material you can teach 14-16 year olds, and yet don’t want ‘baby’ stuff. This makes teaching them difficult. What exactly should you teach? How should you teach it? Having had decades at the chalk face and a few years as a teacher-educator, I feel I might have discovered an answer. I’ve found that using the well-worn trope of the haunted house works a treat – it’s never failed me yet. Why is this? Well, the reasons are quite complex, but in brief, I’ve always found that children of this age are not only very familiar with the ghost-story genre but also extremely keen to share their stories with each other

    What’s Next? Ecoliteracies and creative writing

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    This article explores what ecoliteracies are; showing that they are more than being aware about the enivronment. It argues that ecoliteracies are about people developing an organic, ecological view of language. It suggests through some empirical evidence that creative writing can be used to nurture ecoliteracies

    Diagrarting: Theorising and practising new ways of writing

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    This article explains what is meant by the neologism, coined by the author, ‘diagrarting’. It shows how diagrarting could be a new form of writing and drawing which is useful for writers, teachers and learners. In brief, the phrase diagrarting combines the words diagrams, dialogue and art. Diagrarting involves adopting an artistic identity when making marks on the page. To diagrart, one must write and draw, and believe you are creating art, no matter how crude you think your work to be. A diagrart is invariably rough and ready, and possibly not comprehensible to anyone else but its author. A diagrart is made intelligible through dialogue. If working alone, an author may talk to their diagrart, asking themselves about what it means, what they have learnt from it and so on. If working with other people, a diagrart is explained through conversation. This article shows how and why diagrarting could be important practice for writers, artists, teachers and pupils to adopt in different contexts, providing empirical evidence of its success in the author’s own creative practice and in an inner-city school

    Review of Real-World Writers: A Handbook for Teaching Writing with 7-11 Year Olds by Ross Young and Felicity Ferguson

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    Review of Real-World Writers: A Handbook for Teaching Writing with 7-11 Year Olds by Ross Young and Felicity Ferguso

    The Time Devil runs amok: How I improved my creative practice by adopting a multimodal approach for a specific audience.

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    This research illustrates how teacher-writers can improve their craft and pedagogy by writing for a specific audience, namely school children. It also illustrates why they might do so. It interrogates what was learnt from an innovative collaboration between a university teacher-education department, an inner-city secondary school and the United Kingdom’s National Maritime Museum (NMM). Multimodality (Barnard 2019) inspired the project: local spaces, institutional settings, historical objects, photographs, pictures, time-travelling films and narratives motivated the teacher-writer and participants to read and respond imaginatively to the world. The author found that the project caused him to “remediate” his own practice: to transfer “existing skills in order to tackle new genres” (Barnard 2019: 121). This process enabled him to become a more effective writer and teacher. The research shows that the problem of multimodal overload – having too much choice regarding what to write about and the many forms writing can take – can be circumnavigated if participants are given both autonomy and constraints. It illustrates in some depth how the concept of reciprocity is vital to adopt if writers are to improve their craft

    Lockdown lessons: Teaching and working during the Covid-19 crisis

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    An article exploring some of the lessons I learnt during the lockdown crisis, about staying sane, being mindful and engaging with technology

    Angela Kreeger: Subject of the miracle of modern medicine and psychoanalysis.

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    An blog exploring the life and work of the psycho-analyst, Angela Kreeger

    Review of Out of Time: Poetry From the Climate Emergency

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    A review of 'Out of Time: Poetry From the Climate Emergency
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