483 research outputs found

    The use of a repertory grid technique with siblings of autistic children : how they see themselves, their siblings and their peers

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    Using a repertory grid technique, 15 siblings of autistic children were asked to describe themselves, their siblings and their peers. Siblings of Downs Syndrome (N=15) and nondisabled (N=15) children were also interviewed to control for the effects of having a 'disabled' sibling and to examine the types of constructs generated in relation to normal sibling and peer relationships. The children's ages ranged from 8 to 19 years. A large number of constructs were generated using the dyadic sort method, and these were subject to a preliminary content analysis. The children's generated constructs were also analysed using the GRAN computer program. A number of supplied constructs were included at the end of each child's grid to facilitate comparisons between the element ratings made by siblings in each of the three groups. Following the grid administration, a short semi-structured interview was conducted to explore the nature of the relationship with the target sibling in more detail. The findings of these multiple data sources were then compared using the process of triangulation. The results suggest that whilst children with autistic and Downs Syndrome siblings both use characteristics relating to their target sibling's 'disability'to distinguish them from the other children being rated, the autistic child is discriminated further on the basis of constructs pertaining to their low levels and impaired style of social interaction. The potential consequences for the social and emotional development of the nonautistic child are considered and suggestions for clinical interventions with this client group are presented. Methodological considerations suggest that by allowing children to respond freely, using their own language and construct systems, valuable insight can be gained concerning the unique and shared experiences of these children

    Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria associated with porcine respiratory disease in Australia

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    The porcine respiratory disease complex greatly affects the health and production of pigs. While antimicrobial agents are used to treat the respiratory infections caused by bacterial pathogens, there is no current information on antimicrobial resistance in Australian pig respiratory bacterial isolates. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profiles, by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of nine antimicrobial agents for 71 Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, 51 Pasteurella multocida and 18 Bordetella bronchiseptica cultured from Australian pigs. The majority of A. pleuropneumoniae isolates were resistant to erythromycin (89%) and tetracycline (75%). Resistance to ampicillin (8.5%), penicillin (8.5%) and tilmicosin (25%) was also identified. The P. multocida isolates exhibited resistance to co-trimoxazole (2%), florfenicol (2%), ampicillin (4%), penicillin (4%), erythromycin (14%) and tetracycline (28%). While all the B. bronchiseptica isolates showed resistance to beta-lactams (ampicillin, ceftiofur and penicillin), some were resistant to erythromycin (94%), florfenicol (6%), tilmicosin (22%) and tetracycline (39%). The incidence of multiple drug resistance (MDR) varied across the species - in B. bronchiseptica, 27.8% of resistant isolates showed MDR, while 9.1% of the resistant isolates in A. pleuropneumoniae, and 4.8% in P. multocida showed MDR. This study illustrated that Australian pig strains of bacterial respiratory pathogens exhibited low levels of resistance to antimicrobial agents commonly used in the pig industry

    Vertical modular framework eLearning manual

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    Use of a proposed antimicrobial susceptibility testing method for Haemophilus parasuis

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    The aim of this study was to examine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 97 Haemophilus parasuis cultured from Australian pigs. As there is no existing standard antimicrobial susceptibility technique available for H. parasuis, methods utilising the supplemented media, BA/SN for disc diffusion and test medium broth (TMB) for a microdilution technique, were initially evaluated with the reference strains recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The results of the media evaluation suggested that BA/SN and TMB can be used as suitable media for susceptibility testing of H. parasuis. The proposed microdilution technique was then used with 97 H. parasuis isolates and nine antimicrobial agents. The study found that Australian isolates showed elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for ampicillin (1%), penicillin (2%), erythromycin (7%), tulathromycin (9%), tilmicosin (22%), tetracycline (31%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (40%). This study has described potential antimicrobial susceptibility methods for H. parasuis and has detected a low percentage of Australian H. parasuis isolates with elevated antimicrobial MICs

    Arte convenzionale – ovvero – perché non possono esistere artisti realmente anticonformisti

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    The representation of the artist is generally that of a nonconformist, a lonely Bohemian eager to revolutionise the world from his studio. From this perspective, the traditional interpretation of art history is one of linear progress, spurred on by moments of innovation aiming at new states of conventionalism. This article shows how such a perspective has much to do with the philosophy of modern times, even though it doesn’t provide a satisfactory explanation of the meaning and development of art throughout the centuries, bound as they are instead to the necessity of convention with the values of society (or of its élite) rather than on wild individualism

    Deficient histone H3 propionylation by BRPF1-KAT6 complexes in neurodevelopmental disorders and cancer

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    Lysine acetyltransferase 6A (KAT6A) and its paralog KAT6B form stoichiometric complexes with bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) for acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 23 (H3K23). We report that these complexes also catalyze H3K23 propionylation in vitro and in vivo. Immunofluorescence microscopy and ATAC-See revealed the association of this modification with active chromatin. Brpf1 deletion obliterates the acylation in mouse embryos and fibroblasts. Moreover, we identify BRPF1 variants in 12 previously unidentified cases of syndromic intellectual disability and demonstrate that these cases and known BRPF1 variants impair H3K23 propionylation. Cardiac anomalies are present in a subset of the cases. H3K23 acylation is also impaired by cancer-derived somatic BRPF1 mutations. Valproate, vorinostat, propionate and butyrate promote H3K23 acylation. These results reveal the dual functionality of BRPF1-KAT6 complexes, shed light on mechanisms underlying related developmental disorders and various cancers, and suggest mutation-based therapy for medical conditions with deficient histone acylation

    LSST: from Science Drivers to Reference Design and Anticipated Data Products

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    (Abridged) We describe here the most ambitious survey currently planned in the optical, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). A vast array of science will be enabled by a single wide-deep-fast sky survey, and LSST will have unique survey capability in the faint time domain. The LSST design is driven by four main science themes: probing dark energy and dark matter, taking an inventory of the Solar System, exploring the transient optical sky, and mapping the Milky Way. LSST will be a wide-field ground-based system sited at Cerro Pach\'{o}n in northern Chile. The telescope will have an 8.4 m (6.5 m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 deg2^2 field of view, and a 3.2 Gigapixel camera. The standard observing sequence will consist of pairs of 15-second exposures in a given field, with two such visits in each pointing in a given night. With these repeats, the LSST system is capable of imaging about 10,000 square degrees of sky in a single filter in three nights. The typical 5σ\sigma point-source depth in a single visit in rr will be 24.5\sim 24.5 (AB). The project is in the construction phase and will begin regular survey operations by 2022. The survey area will be contained within 30,000 deg2^2 with δ<+34.5\delta<+34.5^\circ, and will be imaged multiple times in six bands, ugrizyugrizy, covering the wavelength range 320--1050 nm. About 90\% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will uniformly observe a 18,000 deg2^2 region about 800 times (summed over all six bands) during the anticipated 10 years of operations, and yield a coadded map to r27.5r\sim27.5. The remaining 10\% of the observing time will be allocated to projects such as a Very Deep and Fast time domain survey. The goal is to make LSST data products, including a relational database of about 32 trillion observations of 40 billion objects, available to the public and scientists around the world.Comment: 57 pages, 32 color figures, version with high-resolution figures available from https://www.lsst.org/overvie

    Health system performance for people with diabetes in 28 low- and middle-income countries:A cross-sectional study of nationally representative surveys

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    International audienceThe prevalence of diabetes is increasing rapidly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), urgently requiring detailed evidence to guide the response of health systems to this epidemic. In an effort to understand at what step in the diabetes care continuum individuals are lost to care, and how this varies between countries and population groups, this study examined health system performance for diabetes among adults in 28 LMICs using a cascade of care approach

    The state of hypertension care in 44 low-income and middle-income countries:a cross-sectional study of nationally representative individual-level data from 1·1 million adults

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    Evidence from nationally representative studies in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) on where in the hypertension care continuum patients are lost to care is sparse. This information, however, is essential for effective targeting of interventions by health services and monitoring progress in improving hypertension care. We aimed to determine the cascade of hypertension care in 44 LMICs-and its variation between countries and population groups-by dividing the progression in the care process, from need of care to successful treatment, into discrete stages and measuring the losses at each stage. In this cross-sectional study, we pooled individual-level population-based data from 44 LMICs. We first searched for nationally representative datasets from the WHO Stepwise Approach to Surveillance (STEPS) from 2005 or later. If a STEPS dataset was not available for a LMIC (or we could not gain access to it), we conducted a systematic search for survey datasets; the inclusion criteria in these searches were that the survey was done in 2005 or later, was nationally representative for at least three 10-year age groups older than 15 years, included measured blood pressure data, and contained data on at least two hypertension care cascade steps. Hypertension was defined as a systolic blood pressure of at least 140 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure of at least 90 mm Hg, or reported use of medication for hypertension. Among those with hypertension, we calculated the proportion of individuals who had ever had their blood pressure measured; had been diagnosed with hypertension; had been treated for hypertension; and had achieved control of their hypertension. We weighted countries proportionally to their population size when determining this hypertension care cascade at the global and regional level. We disaggregated the hypertension care cascade by age, sex, education, household wealth quintile, body-mass index, smoking status, country, and region. We used linear regression to predict, separately for each cascade step, a country's performance based on gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, allowing us to identify countries whose performance fell outside of the 95% prediction interval. Our pooled dataset included 1 100 507 participants, of whom 192 441 (17·5%) had hypertension. Among those with hypertension, 73·6% of participants (95% CI 72·9-74·3) had ever had their blood pressure measured, 39·2% of participants (38·2-40·3) had been diagnosed with hypertension, 29·9% of participants (28·6-31·3) received treatment, and 10·3% of participants (9·6-11·0) achieved control of their hypertension. Countries in Latin America and the Caribbean generally achieved the best performance relative to their predicted performance based on GDP per capita, whereas countries in sub-Saharan Africa performed worst. Bangladesh, Brazil, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Kyrgyzstan, and Peru performed significantly better on all care cascade steps than predicted based on GDP per capita. Being a woman, older, more educated, wealthier, and not being a current smoker were all positively associated with attaining each of the four steps of the care cascade. Our study provides important evidence for the design and targeting of health policies and service interventions for hypertension in LMICs. We show at what steps and for whom there are gaps in the hypertension care process in each of the 44 countries in our study. We also identified countries in each world region that perform better than expected from their economic development, which can direct policy makers to important policy lessons. Given the high disease burden caused by hypertension in LMICs, nationally representative hypertension care cascades, as constructed in this study, are an important measure of progress towards achieving universal health coverage. Harvard McLennan Family Fund, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

    Association between country preparedness indicators and quality clinical care for cardiovascular disease risk factors in 44 lower- and middle-income countries:A multicountry analysis of survey data

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    BackgroundCardiovascular diseases are leading causes of death, globally, and health systems that deliver quality clinical care are needed to manage an increasing number of people with risk factors for these diseases. Indicators of preparedness of countries to manage cardiovascular disease risk factors (CVDRFs) are regularly collected by ministries of health and global health agencies. We aimed to assess whether these indicators are associated with patient receipt of quality clinical care.Methods and findingsWe did a secondary analysis of cross-sectional, nationally representative, individual-patient data from 187,552 people with hypertension (mean age 48.1 years, 53.5% female) living in 43 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and 40,795 people with diabetes (mean age 52.2 years, 57.7% female) living in 28 LMICs on progress through cascades of care (condition diagnosed, treated, or controlled) for diabetes or hypertension, to indicate outcomes of provision of quality clinical care. Data were extracted from national-level World Health Organization (WHO) Stepwise Approach to Surveillance (STEPS), or other similar household surveys, conducted between July 2005 and November 2016. We used mixed-effects logistic regression to estimate associations between each quality clinical care outcome and indicators of country development (gross domestic product [GDP] per capita or Human Development Index [HDI]); national capacity for the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases ('NCD readiness indicators' from surveys done by WHO); health system finance (domestic government expenditure on health [as percentage of GDP], private, and out-of-pocket expenditure on health [both as percentage of current]); and health service readiness (number of physicians, nurses, or hospital beds per 1,000 people) and performance (neonatal mortality rate). All models were adjusted for individual-level predictors including age, sex, and education. In an exploratory analysis, we tested whether national-level data on facility preparedness for diabetes were positively associated with outcomes. Associations were inconsistent between indicators and quality clinical care outcomes. For hypertension, GDP and HDI were both positively associated with each outcome. Of the 33 relationships tested between NCD readiness indicators and outcomes, only two showed a significant positive association: presence of guidelines with being diagnosed (odds ratio [OR], 1.86 [95% CI 1.08-3.21], p = 0.03) and availability of funding with being controlled (OR, 2.26 [95% CI 1.09-4.69], p = 0.03). Hospital beds (OR, 1.14 [95% CI 1.02-1.27], p = 0.02), nurses/midwives (OR, 1.24 [95% CI 1.06-1.44], p = 0.006), and physicians (OR, 1.21 [95% CI 1.11-1.32], p ConclusionIn this study, we observed that indicators of country preparedness to deal with CVDRFs are poor proxies for quality clinical care received by patients for hypertension and diabetes. The major implication is that assessments of countries' preparedness to manage CVDRFs should not rely on proxies; rather, it should involve direct assessment of quality clinical care
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