419 research outputs found

    Description of Khamul, gen. n. (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Eurytomidae), with a hypothesis of its phylogenetic placement

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    Khamul n. gen., a distinctive eurytomid in the subfamily Eurytominae is described from the Neotropics based upon the type species, K. erwini, n. sp. A hypothesis of its phylogenetic placement within Eurytominae is presented, and four new species are described: K. erwini, K. gothmogi, K. lanceolatus, and K. tolkeini. Diagnostic features are included to distincguish this taxon from other eurytomines and a key to species presented. Its biology is unknown, but label data indicate walking stick eggs ( sp.; Phasmatodea: Prisopodidae) as a possible host

    A New Species of \u3ci\u3ePediobius\u3c/i\u3e (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) Parasitizing \u3ci\u3eChyliza Apicalis\u3c/i\u3e (Diptera: Psilidae) in Ash Trees Attacked by \u3ci\u3eAgrilus Planipennis\u3c/i\u3e (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

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    Pediobius chylizae, spec. nov. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), is described as new and illustrated. This parasitoid has been reared from the puparia of Chyliza apicalis Loew (Diptera: Psilidae) collected from under the bark of ash trees (Oleaceae: Fraxinus spp.) dying after attack by the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleptera: Buprestidae), an invasive beetle from Asia. This species is compared with related species of Pediobius from the Holarctic Region

    Leaf Mining Insects and Their Parasitoids in the Old-Growth Forest of the Huron Mountains

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    Leaf mining insects in an old-growth forest along the south central shore of Lake Superior in Michigan are documented. We present the results of a 13-year survey of leaf mining species, larval hosts, seasonal occurrence, and parasitoids, as well as report biological observations. Representative larvae, mines, adults, and parasitoids were preserved. Among the larval host associations, 15 are reported as new. Additionally, 42 parasitoid taxa were identified resulting in six first reports from the New World and 32 new host associations. Two undescribed species (Gelechiidae and Figitidae) discovered through this research were described in earlier publications

    Leaf Mining Insects and Their Parasitoids in the Old-Growth Forest of the Huron Mountains

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    Leaf mining insects in an old-growth forest along the south central shore of Lake Superior in Michigan are documented. We present the results of a 13-year survey of leaf mining species, larval hosts, seasonal occurrence, and parasitoids, as well as report biological observations. Representative larvae, mines, adults, and parasitoids were preserved. Among the larval host associations, 15 are reported as new. Additionally, 42 parasitoid taxa were identified resulting in six first reports from the New World and 32 new host associations. Two undescribed species (Gelechiidae and Figitidae) discovered through this research were described in earlier publications

    New records document \u3ci\u3eCystiphora sonchi\u3c/i\u3e (Vallot) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) and associated parasitoids (Hymenoptera) in the continental United States

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    A gall midge, Cystiphora sonchi (Vallot, 1827) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), is reported for the first time in the continental United States of America from the states of Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota. The gall midge is an obligate parasite of Sonchus L., including perennial sowthistle, Sonchus arvensis L., a weed that was the impetus for earlier releases of C. sonchi as a biological control in Canada. Patches of S. arvensis were commonly infested with C. sonchi, and often leaves were densely galled. Dissections of galled leaves led to the novel finding of multiple C. sonchi larvae in some individual galls. In addition, three para­sitoids emerged from galls sampled in South Dakota: Aprostocetus cf. atticus Graham, Ceraphron sp., and a possible new species of Lyrcus Walker. Further research is warranted to determine the geographic extent of C. sonchi and its parasitoids in the USA, and to determine the impact of C. sonchi on its weedy hosts

    Two hymenopteran egg sac associates of the tent-web orbweaving spider, Cyrtophora citricola (Forskål, 1775) (Araneae, Araneidae)

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    We report the discovery of two wasp species emerging from egg sacs of the spider Cyrtophora citricola (Forskål 1775) collected from mainland Spain and the Canary Islands. We identify one as Philolema palanichamyi (Narendran 1984) (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae) and the other as a member of the Pediobius pyrgo (Walker 1839) species group (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae). This is the first report of Philolema in Europe, and the first documentation of hymenopteran egg predators of C. citricola. The latter finding is particularly relevant, given the multiple invasive populations of C. citricola in the Americas and the Caribbean, where neither egg sac predation nor parasitism is known to occur. We describe rates of emergence by Ph. palanichamyi from spider egg sacs collected from the southern coast of Spain and estimate sex ratios and body size variation among males and females. We also re-describe Ph. palanichamyi based on the female holotype and male paratype specimens

    The Empirical Foundations of Teledermatology: A Review of the Research Evidence

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    Introduction: This article presents the scientific evidence for the merit of telemedicine interventions in the diagnosis and management of skin disorders (teledermatology) in the published literature. The impetus for this work derives from the high prevalence of skin disorders, the high cost, the limited availability of dermatologists in certain areas, and the promise of teledermatology to address unmet needs in this area. Materials and Methods: The findings are based on a targeted review of scientific studies published from January 2005 through April 2015. The initial search yielded some 5,020 articles in Google Scholar and 428 in PubMed. A review of the abstracts yielded 71 publications that met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Evidence is organized according to the following: feasibility and acceptance; intermediate outcomes (use of service, compliance, and diagnostic and treatment concordance and accuracy); outcomes (health improvement and problem resolution); and cost savings. A special section is devoted to studies conducted at the Veterans Health Administration. Results: Definitions of teledermatology varied across a wide spectrum of skin disorders, technologies, diagnostic tools, provider types, settings, and patient populations. Outcome measures included diagnostic concordance, treatment plans, and health. Conclusions: Despite these complexities, sufficient evidence was observed consistently supporting the effectiveness of teledermatology in improving accessibility to specialty care, diagnostic and treatment concordance, and skin care provided by primary care physicians, while also reducing cost. One study reported suboptimal clinical results from teledermatology for patients with pigmented skin lesions. On the other hand, confocal microscopy and advanced dermoscopy improved diagnostic accuracy, especially when rendered by experienced teledermatologists.Peer Reviewedhttps://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/140290/1/tmj.2015.0146.pd

    The distribution of selected localized alien plant species in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

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    Reports were scanned in black and white at a resolution of 600 dots per inch and were converted to text using Adobe Paper Capture Plug-in.Prior to this study, the alien plant control program at Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park was hampered by the paucity and quality of alien plant distribution maps. A systematic program to map important localized alien plants was conducted 1983-1985 to determine the need and feasibility of controlling key alien plant species, establish a baseline for assessing the spread of these species, infer range expansions, locate all populations of a target species to assure thorough treatment, and assess the effectiveness of control programs. Thirty-six species were mapped, with emphasis given to localized alien plant species and those listed as target species in the 1982 Resources Management Plan (National Park Service 1982). The studies focused on Ainahou Ranch, Kilauea Crater, and the Coastal Lowlands west of the 1%9-1974 Mauna Ulu flows. The species distributions were mapped on topographic maps at 1:24,000, 1:12,000, or 1:6,000 scales, although most species are displayed in this report on smaller scale maps. In addition, species profiles are provided. These characterize importance to management, significance as a pest in native ecosystems, effective treatment methods, and history of management. There were two important findings from the distribution studies. Eleven species, previously not targeted for management, were identified from mapping efforts to be invasive and require control efforts. These are Formosan koa, slash pine, loquat, sisal, orange pittosporum, oleaster, English ivy, paperbark, blackwood acacia, kudzu, and guavasteen. The second finding is that five target species were found to be much more widespread than previously thought. These include silky oak, koa haole, fountain grass, Russian olive, and raspberry. This finding lead to an approach in which control efforts on widespread species were carried out only in intensive management units called Special Ecological Areas. Additional distribution mapping studies are recommended for widespread species.National Park Service Contract No. CA 8004 2 000

    A Survey of Air-to-Ground Propagation Channel Modeling for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

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    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), particularly for small UAVs, due to their affordable prices, ease of availability, and ease of operability. Existing and future applications of UAVs include remote surveillance and monitoring, relief operations, package delivery, and communication backhaul infrastructure. Additionally, UAVs are envisioned as an important component of 5G wireless technology and beyond. The unique application scenarios for UAVs necessitate accurate air-to-ground (AG) propagation channel models for designing and evaluating UAV communication links for control/non-payload as well as payload data transmissions. These AG propagation models have not been investigated in detail when compared to terrestrial propagation models. In this paper, a comprehensive survey is provided on available AG channel measurement campaigns, large and small scale fading channel models, their limitations, and future research directions for UAV communication scenarios

    Nanoscale Thin Films of Niobium Oxide on Platinum Surfaces: Creating a Platform for Optimizing Material Composition and Electrochemical Stability

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    A nanoscale thin film of niobium oxide on a platinum substrate was evaluated for its influence on the electronic and chemical properties of the underlying platinum towards the oxygen reduction reaction with applications to proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The nanoscale thin film of niobium oxide was deposited using atomic layer deposition onto the platinum substrate. A film of niobium oxide is a chemically stable and electronically insulating material that can be used to prevent corrosion and electrochemical degradation when layers are several nanometers thick. These layers can be insulating if sufficiently thick and may not be sufficient to protect the platinum from corrosion if too thin. An ∼3 nm thin film of niobium oxide was fabricated on the platinum surface to determine its influence on the electronic and chemical properties at the interface of these materials. The atomic layer deposition process enabled a precise control over the material composition, structure, and layer thickness. The niobium oxide film was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to evaluate whether a balance could be found between the inhibition of platinum degradation and electronic insulation of the platinum for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The 3 nm thin niobium oxide film was found to be sufficiently thin to permit electronic conductivity while reducing the incidence of platinum dissolution
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