2,654 research outputs found

    HEP Applications Evaluation of the EDG Testbed and Middleware

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    Workpackage 8 of the European Datagrid project was formed in January 2001 with representatives from the four LHC experiments, and with experiment independent people from five of the six main EDG partners. In September 2002 WP8 was strengthened by the addition of effort from BaBar and D0. The original mandate of WP8 was, following the definition of short- and long-term requirements, to port experiment software to the EDG middleware and testbed environment. A major additional activity has been testing the basic functionality and performance of this environment. This paper reviews experiences and evaluations in the areas of job submission, data management, mass storage handling, information systems and monitoring. It also comments on the problems of remote debugging, the portability of code, and scaling problems with increasing numbers of jobs, sites and nodes. Reference is made to the pioneeering work of Atlas and CMS in integrating the use of the EDG Testbed into their data challenges. A forward look is made to essential software developments within EDG and to the necessary cooperation between EDG and LCG for the LCG prototype due in mid 2003.Comment: Talk from the 2003 Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics Conference (CHEP03), La Jolla, CA, USA, March 2003, 7 pages. PSN THCT00

    Organization and management of ATLAS software releases

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    International audienceATLAS is one of the largest collaborations ever undertaken in the physical sciences. This paper explains how the software infrastructure is organized to manage collaborative code development by around 300 developers with varying degrees of expertise, situated in 30 different countries. We will describe how the succeeding releases of the software are built, validated and subsequently deployed to remote sites. Several software management tools have been used, the majority of which are not ATLAS specific; we will show how they have been integrated. ATLAS offline software currently consists of about 2 MSLOC contained in 6800 C++ classes, organized in almost 1000 packages

    DIRAC - Distributed Infrastructure with Remote Agent Control

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    This paper describes DIRAC, the LHCb Monte Carlo production system. DIRAC has a client/server architecture based on: Compute elements distributed among the collaborating institutes; Databases for production management, bookkeeping (the metadata catalogue) and software configuration; Monitoring and cataloguing services for updating and accessing the databases. Locally installed software agents implemented in Python monitor the local batch queue, interrogate the production database for any outstanding production requests using the XML-RPC protocol and initiate the job submission. The agent checks and, if necessary, installs any required software automatically. After the job has processed the events, the agent transfers the output data and updates the metadata catalogue. DIRAC has been successfully installed at 18 collaborating institutes, including the DataGRID, and has been used in recent Physics Data Challenges. In the near to medium term future we must use a mixed environment with different types of grid middleware or no middleware. We describe how this flexibility has been achieved and how ubiquitously available grid middleware would improve DIRAC.Comment: Talk from the 2003 Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP03), La Jolla, Ca, USA, March 2003, 8 pages, Word, 5 figures. PSN TUAT00

    Organization and management of ATLAS offline software releases

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    ATLAS is one of the largest collaborations ever undertaken in the physical sciences. This paper explains how the software infrastructure is organized to manage collaborative code development by around 300 developers with varying degrees of expertise, situated in 30 different countries. ATLAS offline software currently consists of about 2 million source lines of code contained in 6800 C++ classes, organized in almost 1000 packages. We will describe how releases of the offline ATLAS software are built, validated and subsequently deployed to remote sites. Several software management tools have been used, the majority of which are not ATLAS specific; we will show how they have been integrated

    Single hadron response measurement and calorimeter jet energy scale uncertainty with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

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    The uncertainty on the calorimeter energy response to jets of particles is derived for the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). First, the calorimeter response to single isolated charged hadrons is measured and compared to the Monte Carlo simulation using proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of sqrt(s) = 900 GeV and 7 TeV collected during 2009 and 2010. Then, using the decay of K_s and Lambda particles, the calorimeter response to specific types of particles (positively and negatively charged pions, protons, and anti-protons) is measured and compared to the Monte Carlo predictions. Finally, the jet energy scale uncertainty is determined by propagating the response uncertainty for single charged and neutral particles to jets. The response uncertainty is 2-5% for central isolated hadrons and 1-3% for the final calorimeter jet energy scale.Comment: 24 pages plus author list (36 pages total), 23 figures, 1 table, submitted to European Physical Journal

    Standalone vertex Ô¨Ānding in the ATLAS muon spectrometer