18 research outputs found

    Catestatin exerts direct protective effects on rat cardiomyocytes undergoing ischemia/reperfusion by stimulating PI3K-Akt-GSK3╬▓ pathway and preserving mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Get PDF
    Catestatin (Cst) is a 21-amino acid peptide deriving from Chromogranin A. Cst exerts an overall protective effect against an excessive sympathetic stimulation of cardiovascular system, being able to antagonize catecholamine secretion and to reduce their positive inotropic effect, by stimulating the release of nitric oxide (NO) from endothelial cells. Moreover, Cst reduces ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, improving post-ischemic cardiac function and cardiomyocyte survival. To define the cardioprotective signaling pathways activated by Cst (5 nM) we used isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes undergoing simulated I/R. We evaluated cell viability rate with propidium iodide labeling and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) with the fluorescent probe JC-1. The involvement of Akt, GSK3╬▓, eNOS and phospholamban (PLN) cascade was studied by immunofluorescence. The role of PI3K-Akt/NO/cGMP pathway was also investigated by using the pharmacological blockers wortmannin (Wm), L-NMMA and ODQ. Our experiments revealed that Cst increased cell viability rate by 65% and reduced cell contracture in I/R cardiomyocytes. Wm, L-NMMA and ODQ limited the protective effect of Cst. The protective outcome of Cst was related to its ability to maintain MMP and to increase AktSer473, GSK3╬▓Ser9, PLNThr17 and eNOSSer1179 phosphorylation, while treatment with Wm abolished these effects. Thus, the present results show that Cst is able to exert a direct action on cardiomyocytes and give new insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in its protective effect, highlighting the PI3K/NO/cGMP pathway as the trigger and the MMP preservation as the end point of its action

    Obligatory Role for Endothelial Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Caveolae Internalization in Catestatin-Dependent eNOS Activation

    Get PDF
    The chromogranin-A peptide catestatin modulates a wide range of processes, such as cardiovascular functions, innate immunity, inflammation, and metabolism. We recently found that the cardiac antiadrenergic action of catestatin requires a PI3K-dependent NO release from endothelial cells, although the receptor involved is yet to be identified. In the present work, based on the cationic properties of catestatin, we tested the hypothesis of its interaction with membrane heparan sulphate proteoglycans, resulting in the activation of a caveolae-dependent endocytosis. Experiments were performed on bovine aortic endothelial cells. Endocytotic vesicles trafficking was quantified by confocal microscopy using a water-soluble membrane dye; catestatin colocalization with heparan sulphate proteoglycans and caveolin 1 internalization were studied by fluorimetric measurements in live cells. Modulation of the catestatin-dependent eNOS activation was assessed by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis. Our results demonstrate that catestatin (5ÔÇënM) colocalizes with heparan sulphate proteoglycans and induces a remarkable increase in the caveolae-dependent endocytosis and caveolin 1 internalization, which were significantly reduced by both heparinase and wortmannin. Moreover, catestatin was unable to induce Ser1179 eNOS phosphorylation after pretreatments with heparinase and methyl-╬▓-cyclodextrin. Taken together, these results highlight the obligatory role for proteoglycans and caveolae internalization in the catestatin-dependent eNOS activation in endothelial cells

    STAT3 activity is necessary and sufficient for the development of immune-mediated myocarditis in mice and promotes progression to dilated cardiomyopathy

    Get PDF
    Myocarditis, often triggered by viral infection, may lead to heart auto-immunity and dilated cardiomyopathy. What determines the switch between disease resolution and progression is however incompletely understood. We show that pharmacological inhibition of STAT3, the main mediator of IL-6 signalling and of Th17-cell differentiation, protects mice from the development of Experimental Auto-immune Myocarditis reducing liver production of the complement component C3, and can act therapeutically when administered at disease peak. Further, we demonstrate that STAT3 is sufficient when constitutively active for triggering the onset of immune-mediated myocarditis, involving enhanced complement C3 production and IL-6 signalling amplification in the liver. Disease development can be prevented by C3 depletion and IL-6 receptor neutralization. This appears to be relevant to disease pathogenesis in humans, since acute myocarditis patients display significantly elevated circulating IL-6 and C3 levels and activated heart STAT3. Thus, aberrant IL-6/STAT3-mediated induction of liver acute phase response genes including C3, which occurs as a consequence of pre-existing inflammatory conditions, might represent an important factor determining the degree of myocarditis and its clinical outcome
    corecore