324 research outputs found

    HAT-P-27b: A hot Jupiter transiting a G star on a 3 day orbit

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    We report the discovery of HAT-P-27b, an exoplanet transiting the moderately bright G8 dwarf star GSC 0333-00351 (V=12.214). The orbital period is 3.039586 +/- 0.000012 d, the reference epoch of transit is 2455186.01879 +/- 0.00054 (BJD), and the transit duration is 0.0705 +/- 0.0019 d. The host star with its effective temperature 5300 +/- 90 K is somewhat cooler than the Sun, and is more metal-rich with a metallicity of +0.29 +/- 0.10. Its mass is 0.94 +/- 0.04 Msun and radius is 0.90 +/- 0.04 Rsun. For the planetary companion we determine a mass of 0.660 +/- 0.033 MJ and radius of 1.038 +0.077 -0.058 RJ. For the 30 known transiting exoplanets between 0.3 MJ and 0.8 MJ, a negative correlation between host star metallicity and planetary radius, and an additional dependence of planetary radius on equilibrium temperature are confirmed at a high level of statistical significance.Comment: Submitted to ApJ on 2011-01-18. 12 pages, 7 figures, 7 table

    Single transit candidates from K2 : detection and period estimation

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    Photometric surveys such as Kepler have the precision to identify exoplanet and eclipsing binary candidates from only a single transit. K2, with its 75 d campaign duration, is ideally suited to detect significant numbers of single-eclipsing objects. Here we develop a Bayesian transit-fitting tool (‘Namaste: An Mcmc Analysis of Single Transit Exoplanets’) to extract orbital information from single transit events. We achieve favourable results testing this technique on known Kepler planets, and apply the technique to seven candidates identified from a targeted search of K2 campaigns 1, 2 and 3. We find EPIC203311200 to host an excellent exoplanet candidate with a period, assuming zero eccentricity, of 540+410 −230 d and a radius of 0.51 ± 0.05RJup. We also find six further transit candidates for which more follow-up is required to determine a planetary origin. Such a technique could be used in the future with TESS, PLATO and ground-based photometric surveys such as NGTS, potentially allowing the detection of planets in reach of confirmation by Gaia

    The discovery of WASP-151b, WASP-153b, WASP-156b: Insights on giant planet migration and the upper boundary of the Neptunian desert

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    To investigate the origin of the features discovered in the exoplanet population, the knowledge of exoplanets’ mass and radius with a good precision (≲10%) is essential. To achieve this purpose the discovery of transiting exoplanets around bright stars is of prime interest. In this paper, we report the discovery of three transiting exoplanets by the SuperWASP survey and the SOPHIE spectrograph with mass and radius determined with a precision better than 15%. WASP-151b and WASP-153b are two hot Saturns with masses, radii, densities and equilibrium temperatures of 0.31−0.03+0.04 MJ, 1.13−0.03+0.03 RJ, 0.22−0.02+0.03 ρJ and 1290−10+20 K, and 0.39−0.02+0.02 MJ, 1.55−0.08+0.10 RJ, 0.11−0.02+0.02 ρJ and 1700−40+40 K, respectively. Their host stars are early G type stars (with mag V ~ 13) and their orbital periods are 4.53 and 3.33 days, respectively. WASP-156b is a super-Neptune orbiting a K type star (mag V = 11.6). It has a mass of 0.128−0.009+0.010 MJ, a radius of 0.51−0.02+0.02 RJ, a density of 1.0−0.1+0.1 ρJ, an equilibrium temperature of 970−20+30 K and an orbital period of 3.83 days. The radius of WASP-151b appears to be only slightly inflated, while WASP-153b presents a significant radius anomaly compared to a recently published model. WASP-156b, being one of the few well characterized super-Neptunes, will help to constrain the still debated formation of Neptune size planets and the transition between gas and ice giants. The estimates of the age of these three stars confirms an already observed tendency for some stars to have gyrochronological ages significantly lower than their isochronal ages. We propose that high eccentricity migration could partially explain this behavior for stars hosting a short period planet. Finally, these three planets also lie close to (WASP-151b and WASP-153b) or below (WASP-156b) the upper boundary of the Neptunian desert. Their characteristics support that the ultra-violet irradiation plays an important role in this depletion of planets observed in the exoplanet population

    Temozolomide as salvage treatment in primary brain lymphomas

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    Methotrexate (MTX)-based chemotherapy extends survival in patients with primary brain lymphomas, but it is not clear whether multiagent chemotherapy is superior to MTX alone. Treatment options for patients with recurrent primary brain lymphoma are limited; there is no standard second-line chemotherapy. New chemotherapeutic agents with clear activity in brain lymphoma are needed for treatment of recurrent disease. We report the results of a phase II trial assessing activity of the alkylating agent temozolomide in immunocompetent patients with recurrent primary brain lymphomas, previously treated with high-dose MTX-containing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. A median of two courses (range 1–12) of temozolomide 150 mg m−2 day−1, for 5 days every 4 weeks was administered to 36 patients yielding nine complete and two partial responses (response rate: 31%; 95% confidence interval 16–46%). One-year survival was 31% (95% confidence interval 16–46%). Toxicity was negligible. We conclude that temozolomide is active in recurrent primary brain lymphomas and should further be evaluated in this disease, perhaps in combination with MTX as initial treatment

    WASP-86b and WASP-102b: super-dense versus bloated planets

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    We report the discovery of two transiting planetary systems: a super dense, sub-Jupiter mass planet WASP-86b (Mpl = 0.82 ± 0.06 MJ; Rpl = 0.63 ± 0.01 RJ), and a bloated, Saturn-like planet WASP-102b (Mpl = 0.62 ± 0.04 MJ; Rpl = 1.27 ± 0.03 RJ). They orbit their host star every ∼5.03, and ∼2.71 days, respectively. The planet hosting WASP-86 is a F7 star (Teff = 6330±110 K, [Fe/H] = +0.23 ± 0.14 dex, and age ∼0.8–1 Gyr); WASP-102 is a G0 star (Teff = 5940±140 K, [Fe/H] = −0.09± 0.19 dex, and age ∼1 Gyr). These two systems highlight the diversity of planetary radii over similar masses for giant planets with masses between Saturn and Jupiter. WASP-102b shows a larger than model-predicted radius, indicating that the planet is receiving a strong incident flux which contributes to the inflation of its radius. On the other hand, with a density of ρpl = 3.24± 0.3 ρJ, WASP-86b is the densest gas giant planet among planets with masses in the range 0.05 Mpl J. With a stellar mass of 1.34 M⊙ and [Fe/H]= +0.23 dex, WASP-86 could host additional massive and dense planets given that its protoplanetary disc is expected to also have been enriched with heavy elements. In order to match WASP-86b’s density, an extrapolation of theoretical models predicts a planet composition of more than 80% in heavy elements (whether confined in a core or mixed in the envelope). This fraction corresponds to a core mass of approximately 210M⊕ for WASP-86b’s mass of Mpl∼260 M⊕. Only planets with masses larger than about 2 MJ have larger densities than that of WASP-86b, making it exceptional in its mass range

    WASP-38b: a transiting exoplanet in an eccentric, 6.87d period orbit

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    Aims: We report the discovery of WASP-38b, a long period transiting planet in an eccentric 6.871815 day orbit. The transit epoch is 2 455 335.92050 ± 0.00074 (HJD) and the transit duration is 4.663 h. Methods: WASP-38b's discovery was enabled due to an upgrade to the SuperWASP-North cameras. We performed a spectral analysis of the host star HD 146389/BD+10 2980 that yielded Teff = 6150 ± 80 K, log g = 4.3 ± 0.1, v sin i = 8.6 ± 0.4 km s-1, M* = 1.16 ± 0.04 Mʘand R* = 1.33 ± 0.03 Rʘ, consistent with a dwarf of spectral type F8. Assuming a main-sequence mass-radius relation for the star, we fitted simultaneously the radial velocity variations and the transit light curves to estimate the orbital and planetary parameters. Results: The planet has a mass of 2.69 ± 0.06 MJup and a radius of 1.09 ± 0.03 RJup giving a density, ρp = 2.1 ± 0.1 ρJ. The high precision of the eccentricity e = 0.0314 ± 0.0044 is due to the relative transit timing from the light curves and the RV shape. The planet equilibrium temperature is estimated at 1292 ± 33 K. WASP-38b is the longest period planet found by SuperWASP-North and with a bright host star (V = 9.4 mag), is a good candidate for followup atmospheric studies

    WASP-113b and WASP-114b, two inflated hot Jupiters with contrasting densities

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    Aims. We present the discovery and characterisation of the exoplanets WASP-113b and WASP-114b by the WASP surveys, SOPHIE and CORALIE. Methods. The planetary nature of the systems was established by performing follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations. The follow-up data were combined with the WASP-photometry and analysed with an MCMC code to obtain system parameters. Results. The host stars WASP-113 and WASP-114 are very similar. They are both early G-type stars with an effective temperature of ~5900 K, [Fe/H] ~ 0.12, and log g~ 4.1 dex. However, WASP-113 is older than WASP-114. Although the planetary companions have similar radii, WASP-114b is almost four times heavier than WASP-113b. WASP-113b has a mass of 0.48 MJup and an orbital period of ~4.5 days; WASP-114b has a mass of 1.77 MJup and an orbital period of ~1.5 days. Both planets have inflated radii, in particular WASP-113 with a radius anomaly of ℜ = 0.35. The high scale height of WASP-113b (~950 km) makes it a good target for follow-up atmospheric observations.Publisher PDFPeer reviewe
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