48 research outputs found

    Towards a massive directional dark matter detector: CYGNUS-TPC

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    There is now overwhelming observational evidence to believe that only 15% of the matter content of the Universe is known. Hence, the prevailing 85% is composed of non-baryonic dark matter. The putative name for the most probable dark matter candidate is Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Theoretically, one powerful route to find WIMPs is through the detection of the expected directional galactic WIMP signatures using direction sensitive detectors. Recently, the DRIFT directional WIMP search collaboration identified the sources of background events in their detector and have taken positive measures to suppress or reject them. The sensitivity of the DRIFT experiment is now constrained mainly by target mass. This motivated the convergence of all the existing directional WIMP search experiments to form the CYGNUS-TPC collaboration to build a massive directional WIMP search detector with optimal sensitivity. This thesis presents work on the possible use of signal multiplexers to reduce the number of front-end electronics required in the proposed CYGNUS-TPC detector project. Results from the analysis of simulated data obtained from the DRIFT-IId detector in a simplified readout mode show prospects for an alternative readout technology with a lower cost of front-end electronics relative to the signal multiplexing scheme. Results from measurements of the head-tail and axial range components of the directional signatures suggest the possibility of directionality with events fiducialisation in the proposed CYGNUS-TPC detector. Also, results from analyses of a 54.7 live-time days of shielded WIMP search data obtained from the DRIFT-IId directional detector with an improved fiducial volume are pre- sented. In this, the detector reached best sensitivity to spin-dependent WIMP-proton cross section at 0.29 pb for a ‚ąľ100 GeV c‚ąí2 WIMP

    US Cosmic Visions: New Ideas in Dark Matter 2017: Community Report

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    This white paper summarizes the workshop "U.S. Cosmic Visions: New Ideas in Dark Matter" held at University of Maryland on March 23-25, 2017.Comment: 102 pages + reference

    The DUNE Far Detector Interim Design Report, Volume 3: Dual-Phase Module

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    The DUNE IDR describes the proposed physics program and technical designs of the DUNE far detector modules in preparation for the full TDR to be published in 2019. It is intended as an intermediate milestone on the path to a full TDR, justifying the technical choices that flow down from the high-level physics goals through requirements at all levels of the Project. These design choices will enable the DUNE experiment to make the ground-breaking discoveries that will help to answer fundamental physics questions. Volume 3 describes the dual-phase module's subsystems, the technical coordination required for its design, construction, installation, and integration, and its organizational structure

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume II: DUNE Physics

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    The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay -- these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. DUNE is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. Volume II of this TDR, DUNE Physics, describes the array of identified scientific opportunities and key goals. Crucially, we also report our best current understanding of the capability of DUNE to realize these goals, along with the detailed arguments and investigations on which this understanding is based. This TDR volume documents the scientific basis underlying the conception and design of the LBNF/DUNE experimental configurations. As a result, the description of DUNE's experimental capabilities constitutes the bulk of the document. Key linkages between requirements for successful execution of the physics program and primary specifications of the experimental configurations are drawn and summarized. This document also serves a wider purpose as a statement on the scientific potential of DUNE as a central component within a global program of frontier theoretical and experimental particle physics research. Thus, the presentation also aims to serve as a resource for the particle physics community at large

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume I: Introduction to DUNE

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    The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay -- these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. This TDR is intended to justify the technical choices for the far detector that flow down from the high-level physics goals through requirements at all levels of the Project. Volume I contains an executive summary that introduces the DUNE science program, the far detector and the strategy for its modular designs, and the organization and management of the Project. The remainder of Volume I provides more detail on the science program that drives the choice of detector technologies and on the technologies themselves. It also introduces the designs for the DUNE near detector and the DUNE computing model, for which DUNE is planning design reports. Volume II of this TDR describes DUNE's physics program in detail. Volume III describes the technical coordination required for the far detector design, construction, installation, and integration, and its organizational structure. Volume IV describes the single-phase far detector technology. A planned Volume V will describe the dual-phase technology

    The DUNE Far Detector Interim Design Report, Volume 3: Dual-Phase Module