56 research outputs found

    The impact of disability on performance in a high-stakes postgraduate surgical examination : a retrospective cohort study

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    Open Access via Sage Agreement Fundings: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh Royal College of Surgeons of England Acknowledgements The authors would like to acknowledge Iain Targett at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, for his help with data collection and Gregory Ayre from the Intercollegiate Committee for Basic Surgical Examinations for their support during this project. Our thanks to members of the UKMED Research Group who provided useful feedback on an earlier version of this manuscript, and whose comments were helpful in refining the paper. The authors would also like to acknowledge Sebastian Shaw for his valued expertise in SpLD and Daniel Smith for his help with the UKMED database. Data Source: UK Medical Education Database (‘UKMED’). UKMEDP043 extract generated on 25/07/2018. We are grateful to UKMED for the use of these data. However, UKMED bears no responsibility for their analysis or interpretation. The data include information derived from that collected by the Higher Education Statistics Agency Limited (‘HESA’) and provided to the GMC (‘HESA Data’). Source: HESA Student Records 2007/2008 to 2015/2016. Copyright Higher Education Statistics Agency Limited. The Higher Education Statistics Agency Limited makes no warranty as to the accuracy of the HESA Data, cannot accept responsibility for any inferences or conclusions derived by third parties from data or other Information supplied by it.Peer reviewedPublisher PD

    Differential attainment at MRCS according to gender, ethnicity, age and socioeconomic factors : A retrospective cohort study

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    Open access via Sage agreement Acknowledgements The authors would like to acknowledge Iain Targett at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, for his help with data collection and John Hines and Gregory Ayre from the Intercollegiate Committee for Basic Surgical Examinations for their support during this project. Our thanks to members of the UKMED Research Group who provided useful feedback on an earlier version of this manuscript, and whose comments helped refine the paper. The authors would also like to acknowledge Daniel Smith for his help with the UKMED database. Data Source: UK Medical Education Database (“UKMED”). UKMEDP043 extract generated on 25 July 2018. We are grateful to UKMED for the use of these data. However, UKMED bears no responsibility for their analysis or interpretation. The data include information derived from that collected by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (“HESA”) Limited and provided to the GMC (“HESA Data”). Source: HESA Student Records 2007/2008 to 2015/2016. Copyright Higher Education Statistics Agency Limited. The Higher Education Statistics Agency Limited makes no warranty as to the accuracy of the HESA Data, cannot accept responsibility for any inferences or conclusions derived by third parties from data or other Information supplied by it. The dataset used in this study was acquired from the UK Medical Education Database and is held in Safe Haven. All counts have been rounded to the nearest 5 according to HESA data standards to ensure person-level anonymity, as per UKMED policy. Data access requests must be made to UKMED. Full information for applications can be found at https://www.ukmed.ac.uk.Peer reviewedPublisher PD

    Examining the diversity of MRCS examiners

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    Acknowledgements The authors would like to acknowledge Gregory Ayre from the Intercollegiate Committee for Basic Surgical Examinations for his support during this project. Funding Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland. Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow and Royal College of Surgeons of England.Peer reviewedPublisher PD

    Does performance at medical school predict success at the Intercollegiate Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS) examination? : A retrospective cohort study

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    Funding Information: Royal College of Surgeons of England, Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh, Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland and Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow (award/grant number is not applicable). Acknowledgements: The authors would like to acknowledge Iain Targett at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, for his help with data collection and Gregory Ayre from the Intercollegiate Committee for Basic Surgical Examinations for their support during this project. Our thanks to members of the UKMED Research Group who provided useful feedback on an earlier version of this manuscript, and whose comments helped refine the paper. The authors would also like to acknowledge Daniel Smith for his help with the UKMED database. Data Source: UK Medical Education Database (‘UKMED’). UKMEDP043 extract generated on 25 July 2018. We are grateful to UKMED for the use of these data. However, UKMED bears no responsibility for their analysis or interpretation. The data include information derived from that collected by the Higher Education Statistics Agency Limited (‘HESA’) and provided to the GMC (‘HESA Data’). Source: HESA Student Records 2007/2008 to 2015/2016. Copyright Higher Education Statistics Agency. The Higher Education Statistics Agency makes no warranty as to the accuracy of the HESA Data, cannot accept responsibility for any inferences or conclusions derived by third parties from data or other information supplied by it.Peer reviewedPublisher PD

    Does performance at the intercollegiate Membership of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons (MRCS) examination vary according to UK medical school and course type? A retrospective cohort study

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    Acknowledgments The authors would like to acknowledge Iain Targett at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, for his help with data collection and John Hines and Gregory Ayre from the Intercollegiate Committee for Basic Surgical Examinations for their support during this project. Our thanks to members of the UKMED Research Group who provided useful feedback on an earlier version of this manuscript, and whose comments helped refine the paper. The authors would also like to acknowledge Daniel Smith for his help with the UKMED database. Data source: UK Medical Education Database ('UKMED'). UKMEDP043 extract generated on 25/07/2018. We are grateful to UKMED for the use of these data. However, UKMED bears no responsibility for their analysis or interpretation the data includes information derived from that collected by the Higher Education Statistics Agency Limited ('HESA') and provided to the GMC ('HESA Data'). Source: HESA Student Records 2002/2003 to 2015/2016. Copyright Higher Education Statistics Agency Limited. The Higher Education Statistics Agency Limited makes no warranty as to the accuracy of the HESA Data, cannot accept responsibility for any inferences or conclusions derived by third parties from data or other Information supplied by it.Peer reviewedPublisher PD

    Establishing the predictive validity of the intercollegiate membership of the Royal Colleges of surgeons written examination : MRCS Part A

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    Acknowledgements The authors would like to acknowledge Iain Targett at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, and Gregory Ayre from the Intercollegiate Committee for Basic Surgical Examinations for their support during this project. Funding Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, Royal College of Surgeons of England and Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Award/Grant number is not applicable).Peer reviewedPublisher PD

    Establishing the predictive validity of the intercollegiate membership of the Royal Colleges of surgeons written examination : MRCS part B

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    Acknowledgements The authors would like to acknowledge Iain Target at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, and Gregory Ayre from the Intercollegiate Committee for Basic Surgical Examinations for their support during this project. Funding Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, Royal College of Surgeons of England and Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Award/Grant number is not applicable).Peer reviewedPublisher PD

    Understanding how the crowded interior of cells stabilizes DNA/DNA and DNA/RNA hybrids–in silico predictions and in vitro evidence

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    Amplification of DNA in vivo occurs in intracellular environments characterized by macromolecular crowding (MMC). In vitro Polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR), however, is non-crowded, requires thermal cycling for melting of DNA strands, primer-template hybridization and enzymatic primer-extension. The temperature-optima for primer-annealing and extension are strikingly disparate which predicts primers to dissociate from template during extension thereby compromising PCR efficiency. We hypothesized that MMC is not only important for the extension phase in vivo but also during PCR by stabilizing nucleotide hybrids. Novel atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulations elucidated that MMC stabilizes hydrogen-bonding between complementary nucleotides. Real-time PCR under MMC confirmed that melting-temperatures of complementary DNA–DNA and DNA–RNA hybrids increased by up to 8°C with high specificity and high duplex-preservation after extension (71% versus 37% non-crowded). MMC enhanced DNA hybrid-helicity, and drove specificity of duplex formation preferring matching versus mismatched sequences, including hair-pin-forming DNA- single-strands

    The need for multidisciplinarity in specialist training to optimize future patient care

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    Harmonious interactions between radiation, medical, interventional and surgical oncologists, as well as other members of multidisciplinary teams, are essential for the optimization of patient care in oncology. This multidisciplinary approach is particularly important in the current landscape, in which standard-of-care approaches to cancer treatment are evolving towards highly targeted treatments, precise image guidance and personalized cancer therapy. Herein, we highlight the importance of multidisciplinarity and interdisciplinarity at all levels of clinical oncology training. Potential deficits in the current career development pathways and suggested strategies to broaden clinical training and research are presented, with specific emphasis on the merits of trainee involvement in functional multidisciplinary teams. Finally, the importance of training in multidisciplinary research is discussed, with the expectation that this awareness will yield the most fertile ground for future discoveries. Our key message is for cancer professionals to fulfil their duty in ensuring that trainees appreciate the importance of multidisciplinary research and practice
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