358 research outputs found

    Katie Edwards, Assistant Professor of Psychology, COLA travels to South Africa and Kenya

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    Prof. Edwards travelled to Africa to learn more about the innovative sexual violence prevention work happening across the African continent and to discuss similarities and differences in violence prevention in South Africa and the U.S

    Institutional Title IX Requirements for Researchers Conducting Human Subjects Research on Sexual Violence and other Forms of Interpersonal Violence

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    The purpose of this white paper is to provide guidance on how university and college Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) and IRB administrators can oversee, and researchers can conduct, research investigating the different aspects of Sexual Violence and other forms of Interpersonal Violence

    Now or Later?: Deciding when to Pursue a Doctorate Degree in Psychology

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    A Program to Improve Social Reactions to Sexual and Partner Violence Disclosures Reduces Posttraumatic Stress in Subsequently Victimized Participants

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    Objective: Research consistently documents the high rates and deleterious outcomes of dating and sexual violence (DSV) among college students. Thus, there is an urgency to identify cost-effective interventions that can mitigate the negative outcomes associated with these forms of violence. The purpose of the current study was to conduct secondary analyses to assess whether a two-session, face-to-face social support intervention (i.e., Supporting Survivors and Self) would confer psychological benefits for participants who subsequently experienced DSV victimization. Method: Participants were 187 full-time undergraduate students from a university in the northeastern United States who reported at least one form of DSV in the six months following implementation of the program. Results: No intervention effect was identified for self-blame or depressive symptoms among subsequent victims. However, the intervention led to lower levels of overall posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms, including avoidance and changes in cognition and mood symptoms, for participants who experienced unwanted sexual intercourse and/or physical intimate partner violence in the treatment versus those in the control condition. Gender did not moderate intervention effects

    Women\u27s risk perception and sexual victimization: A review of the literature

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    This article reviews empirical and theoretical studies that examined the relationship between risk perception and sexual victimization in women. Studies examining women\u27s general perceptions of risk for sexual assault as well as their ability to identify and respond to threat in specific situations are reviewed. Theoretical discussions of the optimistic bias and cognitive–ecological models of risk recognition are discussed in order to account for findings in the literature. Implications for interventions with women as well as recommendations for future research are provided

    Teaching Therapeutic Yoga to Medical Outpatients: Practice Descriptions, Process Reflections, and Preliminary Outcomes

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    This article describes therapeutic Yoga practices designed for a medical population with mixed diagnoses and a wide range of health challenges. We present preliminary data from 54 adults who participated in Yoga classes at a community medical center serving seventeen counties in Northeast Georgia. Findings suggest that attending therapeutic group Yoga classes can improve health perceptions and mindfulness. These findings are discussed in terms of implications for clinical practice and future research. The Yoga practices are described in detail, for the benefit of teachers and researchers who wish to replicate the practices

    Teen Dating Violence in New Hampshire

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    Dating violence, defined as physical abuse (such as hitting) or sexual abuse (such as forcible sexual activity) that happens within the context of a current or former relationship, leads to a host of negative consequences, including poor mental and physical health and academic difficulties. Therefore, it is important that researchers examine factors that increase or decrease risk for dating violence, and then use this research to create evidence-based prevention and risk reduction efforts

    It’s Not Just the What but the How

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    White House Task Force to Protect Students From Sexual Assault looked to Prevention Innovations Research Center to evaluate efficacy of strategies for prevention and response to sexual violence on campus

    Sexual activity between victims and perpetrators following a sexual assault: A systematic literature review and critical feminist analysis

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    Rarely are perpetrators found guilty of sexual assault when the victim engaged in sex with the perpetrator following the sexual assault. Although the recent trial of Harvey Weinstein is an exception, the fact that his accusers engaged in consensual sex with him following the alleged assaults ignited debate that garnered international attention. The purpose of this paper was to conduct a systematic review to (1) document the extent to which victims engage in sex with the perpetrator following a sexual assault and (2) examine theoretical explanations for this phenomenon. Five peer-reviewed journal articles published between 1988 and 2016 were identified. Whereas rates of sex following a sexual assault where it is unclear based on study methodology if it was consensual ranged from 11 % to 64 %, rates of consensual sex following a sexual assault (where it is clear based on study methodology that it was consensual) ranged from 8 % to 32 %. Although evolutionary perspectives have been used by some researchers to explain this phenomenon, we suggest alternative explanations, grounded in feminist understandings of violence against women, for why a victim may have consensual sex with a perpetrator following a sexual assault. Finally, we identify areas for future research and discuss practice-based implications

    Campus Community Readiness to Engage Measure: Its Utility for Campus Violence Prevention Initiatives—Preliminary Psychometrics

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    The researchers present preliminary psychometric information on a recently developed measure—the Campus Community Readiness to Engage Measure (CCREM)—which was developed as a tool for campuses to determine their readiness to address sexual assault (SA) and relationship abuse (RA). Participants were 353 community leaders and administrators at 131 colleges and universities across New England. Factor analytic results demonstrated that the CCREM had three factors for both SA and RA: denial (the campus community is unwilling to acknowledge that SA and RA are issues for the community), initiation (the campus community is beginning to create efforts to address SA and RA and some community members are involved), and sustainability (the campus has high levels of engagement from community members and longstanding efforts to address SA and RA). Whereas there was fair to moderate agreement among raters within the same community on the sustainability and initiation subscales, there was poor to fair agreement among raters within the same community on the denial subscale. Although additional measurement development research is needed, preliminary data suggest that the CCREM may be useful to campus communities in helping to initiate prevention initiatives and implement services related to SA and RA
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