52 research outputs found

    Educación física, gimnasia y deporte

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    Para analizar esta tem√°tica examinar√© tres ejes: a) ¬Ņqu√© ‚Äúest√° siendo‚ÄĚ la gimnasia?; b) los discursos de la gimnasia y la formaci√≥n inicial en educaci√≥n f√≠sica; y c) la gimnasia en la clase de educaci√≥n f√≠sica, su relaci√≥n con el deporte.Facultad de Humanidades y Ciencias de la Educaci√≥

    The commissioning of the CUORE experiment: the mini-tower run

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    CUORE is a ton-scale experiment approaching the data taking phase in Gran Sasso National Laboratory. Its primary goal is to search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in 130Te using 988 crystals of tellurim dioxide. The crystals are operated as bolometers at about 10 mK taking advantage of one of the largest dilution cryostat ever built. Concluded in March 2016, the cryostat commissioning consisted in a sequence of cool down runs each one integrating new parts of the apparatus. The last run was performed with the fully configured cryostat and the thermal load at 4 K reached the impressive mass of about 14 tons. During that run the base temperature of 6.3 mK was reached and maintained for more than 70 days. An array of 8 crystals, called mini-tower, was used to check bolometers operation, readout electronics and DAQ. Results will be presented in terms of cooling power, electronic noise, energy resolution and preliminary background measurements

    Results from the Cuore Experiment

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    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is the first bolometric experiment searching for neutrinoless double beta decay that has been able to reach the 1-ton scale. The detector consists of an array of 988 TeO2 crystals arranged in a cylindrical compact structure of 19 towers, each of them made of 52 crystals. The construction of the experiment was completed in August 2016 and the data taking started in spring 2017 after a period of commissioning and tests. In this work we present the neutrinoless double beta decay results of CUORE from examining a total TeO2 exposure of 86.3kg yr, characterized by an effective energy resolution of 7.7 keV FWHM and a background in the region of interest of 0.014 counts/ (keV kg yr). In this physics run, CUORE placed a lower limit on the decay half- life of neutrinoless double beta decay of 130Te > 1.3.1025 yr (90% C. L.). Moreover, an analysis of the background of the experiment is presented as well as the measurement of the 130Te 2vo3p decay with a resulting half- life of T2 2. [7.9 :- 0.1 (stat.) :- 0.2 (syst.)] x 10(20) yr which is the most precise measurement of the half- life and compatible with previous results

    CUORICINO: final results

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    CUORICINO, the predecessor experiment of CUORE, was operated in Gran Sasso National Laboratories in Italy and demonstrated the feasibility of CUORE. The CUORICINO detector was an array of large cubic TeO2 crystals summing up to the total mass of 40.7 kg. CUORICINO stopped the data taking in middle 2008. We present the CUORICINO detector performances and final experimental results in double beta decay, on ground and excited states of 130Te and on 120Te, together with the total data analysis that is of fundamental interest in the prediction of the expected CUORE background

    Status of CUORE and results from CUORICINO

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    CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) is a ton-scale bolometric experiment for the search of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay of 130Te. The detector, an array of 988 TeO2 crystals arranged in 19 towers, will probe the Majorana nature of neutrino in the inverted mass-hierarchy region. Currently under construction at the Underground Gran Sasso National Laboratories, Italy, the experiment is foreseen to start data taking by 2012. The feasibility of CUORE was demonstrated by the recently completed pilot experiment CUORICINO, which set a lower limit on the Double Beta Decay time of 130Te of T 1 / 2 0 őĹ > 3.1 √ó 10 24 y . The status of CUORE and the results from CUORICINO will be presented

    Toward sub-Kelvin resistive cooling and non destructive detection of trapped non-neutral electron plasma

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    A resonant circuit tuned to a particular frequency of the motion of charged particles stored in a Penning trap and connected to a low noise amplifier allows, at the same time, cooling and non destructive detection of the particles. Its use is widely diffused when single or few particles are stored near the centre of a hyperbolic Penning trap. We present a consistent model that predicts the shape of the induced signal when the tuned circuit is used to detect and cool the axial motion of a cold non neutral plasma stored in an open-ended cylindrical Penning trap. The model correctly accounts for the not negligible axial plasma size. We show that the power spectrum of the signal measured across the tuned circuit provides information about the particle number and insights about the plasma temperature. We report on the design of a HEMT-based cryogenic amplifier working at 14.4 MHz and 4.2 K and the results of the noise measurements. We have measured a drain current noise in the range from 6 to 17 pA/ p Hz, which corresponds to an increase of the tuned circuit equivalent temperature of at maximum 0.35 K. The cryogenic amplifier has a very low power consumption from few tens to few hundreds of \u3bcW corresponding to a drain current in the range 100-800 \u3bcA. An additional contribution due to the gate noise has been identified when the drain current is below 300 \u3bcA; above that value an upper limit of the increase of the equivalent tuned circuit temperature due to this contribution of 0.02 K has been obtained. These features make the tuned circuit connected to this amplifier a promising device for detecting and cooling the axial motion of an electron plasma when the Penning trap is mounted inside a dilution refrigerator

    Phonon-Mediated KIDs as Light Detectors for Rare Event Search: The CALDER Project

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    Background suppression plays a crucial role in particle physics experiments searching for rare events, such as neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter interactions. Bolometers, that are among the most competitive devices in this field, would largely benefit from the development of ultrasensitive light detectors, as the combined readout of the bolometric and light signals enables the particle identification. The CALDER collaboration is developing superconducting light detectors that will match the requirements of next generation experiments: noise lower than 20 eV, large active area (>>20 cm 2^2), wide temperature range of operation, high radiopurity, and ease in fabricating hundreds of channels. For this purpose, we are exploiting the excellent energy resolution and the natural multiplexed readout provided by kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs). KIDs have already demonstrated their potentiality as direct detectors of photons for different astrophysical applications. The aim of our project is to apply this technology in particle physics, using indirect detection. These devices can be operated in a phonon-mediated approach, in which KIDs are coupled to a large insulating substrates in order to increase the active surface from a few mm2^2 to 25 cm 2^2. We have already demonstrated the feasibility of a phonon-mediated KIDs-based light detectors, using aluminium sensors. These device reached a baseline sensitivity of around 80 eV with an overall efficiency of about 20%. Currently, we are testing new materials (e.g., Ti-Al and nonstoichiometric TiN) to enhance the sensitivity and reach the goal of our project. We present our results and the physical interpretation of the device behavior. Finally, we also discuss the impact of this project on the most advanced bolometric experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter

    Phonon-Mediated KIDs as Light Detectors for Rare Event Search: The CALDER Project

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    Background suppression plays a crucial role in particle physics experiments searching for rare events, such as neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter interactions. Bolometers, that are among the most competitive devices in this field, would largely benefit from the development of ultrasensitive light detectors, as the combined readout of the bolometric and light signals enables the particle identification. The CALDER collaboration is developing superconducting light detectors that will match the requirements of next generation experiments: noise lower than 20 eV, large active area (>>20 cm 2^2), wide temperature range of operation, high radiopurity, and ease in fabricating hundreds of channels. For this purpose, we are exploiting the excellent energy resolution and the natural multiplexed readout provided by kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs). KIDs have already demonstrated their potentiality as direct detectors of photons for different astrophysical applications. The aim of our project is to apply this technology in particle physics, using indirect detection. These devices can be operated in a phonon-mediated approach, in which KIDs are coupled to a large insulating substrates in order to increase the active surface from a few mm2^2 to 25 cm 2^2. We have already demonstrated the feasibility of a phonon-mediated KIDs-based light detectors, using aluminium sensors. These device reached a baseline sensitivity of around 80 eV with an overall efficiency of about 20%. Currently, we are testing new materials (e.g., Ti-Al and nonstoichiometric TiN) to enhance the sensitivity and reach the goal of our project. We present our results and the physical interpretation of the device behavior. Finally, we also discuss the impact of this project on the most advanced bolometric experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay and dark matter
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