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    A numerical study of a method for measuring the effective in situ sound absorption coefficient

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    The accuracy of a method [Wijnant et al., “Development and applica- tion of a new method for the in-situ measurement of sound absorption”, ISMA 31, Leuven, Belgium (2010).], for measurement of the effective area-averaged in situ sound absorption coefficient is investigated. Based on a local plane wave assump- tion, this method can be applied to sound fields for which a model is not available. Investigations were carried out by means of finite element simulations for a typical case. The results show that the method is a promising method for determining the effective area-averaged in situ sound absorption coefficient in complex sound fields

    Comparison of inverse methods and particle velocity based techniques for transfer path analysis

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    International audienceDirect sound field visualization is not always the best way to assess complex noise problems. Maps of sound pressure, particle velocity or intensity in the vicinity of a source might not be directly related to the pressure contribution for a given position. Transfer path analysis has been implemented for many years to evaluate this case scenario, which requires using information of the environment and the sound source. Inverse methods commonly require a detailed geometric description of the problem along with sound pressure measurements. On the other hand, particle velocity methods rely on measuring the reciprocal transfer path and the velocity close to the sources. This paper presents the theoretical bases of the two principles and compares the advantages and disadvantages of the two methods applied to real industrial applications

    NG peptides: A novel family of neurophysin-associated neuropeptides

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    NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in GENE. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in GENE, [VOL 458, ISSUE 1-2, (2010)] DOI: 10.1016/j.gene.2010.03.00

    Scan and paint: theory and practice of a sound field visualization method

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    Sound visualization techniques have played a key role in the development of acoustics throughout history. The development of measurement apparatus and techniques for displaying sound and vibration phenomena has provided excellent tools for building understanding about specific problems. Traditional methods, such as step-by-step measurements or simultaneous multichannel systems, have a strong tradeoff between time requirements, flexibility, and cost. However, if the sound field can be assumed time stationary, scanning methods allow us to assess variations across space with a single transducer, as long as the position of the sensor is known. The proposed technique, Scan and Paint, is based on the acquisition of sound pressure and particle velocity by manually moving a P-U probe (pressure-particle velocity sensors) across a sound field whilst filming the event with a camera. The sensor position is extracted by applying automatic color tracking to each frame of the recorded video. It is then possible to visualize sound variations across the space in terms of sound pressure, particle velocity, or acoustic intensity. In this paper, not only the theoretical foundations of the method, but also its practical applications are explored such as scanning transfer path analysis, source radiation characterization, operational deflection shapes, virtual phased arrays, material characterization, and acoustic intensity vector field mapping
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