200 research outputs found

    Norman Denzin and <i>America</i>

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    A personal appreciation of the life and work of Norman Denzin

    There Was a Queer Guy:a performative poetic inquiry into heterosexism

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    At a time when hate crimes related to sexuality and gender identity are increasing and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ+) youth are disproportionately more likely to attempt suicide, this critical poetic inquiry revisits our shared history of heterosexism. Specifically, through the methodology of performance autoethnography, I explore some of the processes through which heterosexism, homophobia, and heteronormativity have operated within British culture across my own life course. I reimagine a well-known traditional rhyme with the aspiration that this accessible poem be used by others as a component of their activism and teaching on diversity and LGBTQ+ rights

    Social support for and through exercise and sport in a sample of men with serious mental illness.

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    Social support is important for people experiencing serious mental illness and is also important during the initiation and maintenance of exercise. In this article we draw on interpretive research into the experiences of 11 men with serious mental illness to explore four dimensions of social support both for and through exercise. Our findings suggest that informational, tangible, esteem, and emotional support were both provided for and given by participants through exercise. We conclude that experiences of both receiving and giving diverse forms of support in this way are significant for some people living with and recovering from serious mental illness

    Narrative, identity, and recovery from serious mental illness: A life history of a runner

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    In recent years, researchers have investigated the psychological effects of exercise for people with mental health problems, often by focusing on how exercise may alleviate symptoms of mental illness. In this article I take a different tack to explore the ways in which exercise contributed a sense of meaning, purpose, and identity to the life of one individual named Ben, a runner diagnosed with schizophrenia. Drawing on life history data, I conducted an analysis of narrative to explore the narrative types that underlie Ben's stories of mental illness and exercise. For Ben, serious mental illness profoundly disrupted a pre-existing athletic identity removing agency, continuity, and coherence from his life story. By returning to exercise several years later, Ben reclaimed his athletic identity and reinstated some degree of narrative agency, continuity, and coherence. While the relationships between narrative, identity, and mental health are undoubtedly complex, Ben's story suggests that exercise can contribute to recovery by being a personally meaningful activity which reinforces identity and sense of self

    ‘Throughness’: A Story About Songwriting as Auto/ethnography

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    A recent special issue of Qualitative Inquiry (December 2016) throws a welcome spotlight on the place of songs within qualitative research. In this essay, I share a story that contributes to the gathering conversation around music and songs as a (perhaps unique) form of qualitative inquiry. My contribution focuses specifically on songwriting as a form of research, which has received limited attention to date within the qualitative inquiry literature. The story is inspired by recent explorations of songwriting as reflexive practice, and I share it with the aim of expanding understanding and inviting further dialogue on the processes of writing (songs as) qualitative research

    Narrative, identity and mental health: How men with serious mental illness re-story their lives through sport and exercise

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    Objectives: It has been suggested that mental illness threatens identity and sense of self when one's personal story is displaced by dominant illness narratives focussing on deficit and dysfunction. One role of therapy, therefore, is to allow individuals to re-story their life in a more positive way which facilitates the reconstruction of a meaningful identity and sense of self. This research explores the ways in which involvement in sport and exercise may play a part in this process. Design: Qualitative analysis of narrative. Method: We used an interpretive approach which included semi-structured interviews and participant observation with 11 men with serious mental illness to gather stories of participants' sport and exercise experiences. We conducted an analysis of narrative to explore the more general narrative types which were evident in participants' accounts. Findings: We identified three narrative types underlying participants' talk about sport and exercise: (a) an action narrative about "going places and doing stuff"; (b) an achievement narrative about accomplishment through effort, skill or courage; (c) a relationship narrative of shared experiences to talk about combined with opportunities to talk about those experiences. We note that these narrative types differ significantly from-and may be considered alternatives to-dominant illness narratives. Conclusion: This study provides an alternative perspective on how sport and exercise can help men with serious mental illness by providing the narrative resources which enabled participants to re-story aspects of their lives through creating and sharing personal stories through which they rebuilt or maintained a positive sense of self and identity. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

    Mental health and physical activity in recovery

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