2,093 research outputs found

    The Constitution in the Supreme Court: Contracts and Commerce, 1836-1864

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    Continuing a study of the first hundred years of constitutional litigation, Professor Currie explores the decisions of the Taney period respecting the Contract and Commerce Clauses. Though early decisions of the Taney Court seemed to portend a departure from the nationalism of its predecessor, the author argues that the impression was largely misleading. In general, for example, the Court under Taney proved rather sympathetic to contract rights. In Commerce Clause cases, after being badly split, the Court was able to agree on a longlasting formula that acknowledged an implicit limitation on state power; and although in the Taney period the Court never clearly struck down a state law on Commerce Clause grounds, it found other ways to protect the interest in unobstructed commerce

    Separating Judicial Power

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    Currie outlines the development of the status of judges in England and in the US, with a brief reference to the German system. He also discusses some of the more important controversies over judicial independence and accountability that have arisen under the US Constitution

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    Foreign Affairs: Presidential Initiative and Congressional Control

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    Jefferson Powell is one of our foremost scholars of constitutional history. He is particularly adept at bringing extrajudicial sources to bear on constitutional issues. Owing perhaps in part to his extensive service in the Department of Justice, he has a special facility for the use of executive materials; he is surely our leading academic expert on executive interpretation of the Constitution. In his latest book Professor Powell applies his enviable skills to the recurring, fundamental, and controversial question of the division of authority between the President and Congress in the realm of foreign affairs. As is always the case when he puts the modern equivalent of pencil to paper, we are much the richer for his having done so
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