25 research outputs found

    Accelerator performance analysis of the Fermilab Muon Campus

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    Fermilab is dedicated to hosting world-class experiments in search of new physics that will operate in the coming years. The Muon g-2 Experiment is one such experiment that will determine with unprecedented precision the muon anomalous magnetic moment, which offers an important test of the Standard Model. We describe in this study the accelerator facility that will deliver a muon beam to this experiment. We first present the lattice design that allows for efficient capture, transport, and delivery of polarized muon beams. We then numerically examine its performance by simulating pion production in the target, muon collection by the downstream beam line optics, as well as transport of muon polarization. We finally establish the conditions required for the safe removal of unwanted secondary particles that minimizes contamination of the final beam.Comment: 10 p

    Reduction of coherent betatron oscillations in a muon g-2 storage ring experiment using RF fields

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    This work demonstrates that two systematic errors, coherent betatron oscillations (CBO) and muon losses can be reduced through application of radio frequency (RF) electric fields, which ultimately increases the sensitivity of the muon g−2g-2 experiments. As the ensemble of polarized muons goes around a weak focusing storage ring, their spin precesses, and when they decay through the weak interaction, ÎŒ+→e+ÎœeΜΌˉ\mu^+ \rightarrow e^+ \nu_e \bar{\nu_\mu}, the decay positrons are detected by electromagnetic calorimeters. In addition to the expected exponential decay in the positron time spectrum, the weak decay asymmetry causes a modulation in the number of positrons in a selected energy range at the difference frequency between the spin and cyclotron frequencies, ωa\omega_\text{a}. This frequency is directly proportional to the magnetic anomaly aÎŒ=(g−2)/2a_\mu =(g-2)/2, where gg is the g-factor of the muon, which is slightly greater than 2. The detector acceptance depends on the radial position of the muon decay, so the CBO of the muon bunch following injection into the storage ring modulate the measured muon signal with the frequency ωCBO\omega_\text{CBO}. In addition, the muon populations at the edge of the beam hit the walls of the vacuum chamber before decaying, which also affects the signal. Thus, reduction of CBO and unwanted muon loss increases the aÎŒa_\mu measurement sensitivity. Numerical and experimental studies with RF electric fields yield more than a magnitude reduction of the CBO, with muon losses comparable to the conventional method.Comment: 14 pages, 25 figure

    Measurement of the e.*0 cross section by the radiative return method using Belle data

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    A e+e− → π+π−π0 visible cross section is measured with the radiative return method over 0.73 ≀ √s < 3.5 GeV, using 526.6 fb−1 of ΄(4S) data collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e− collider. This measurement provides an important check on the newer SND and BABAR e+e− → π+π−π0 cross section measurements that conflict with the older ND and DM2 measurements. This measurement will contribute to the reduction in error for the Standard Model calculations of the muon anomalous magnetic moment and the running of α, while also contributing to the field of hadron spectroscopy

    Highly-parallelized simulation of a pixelated LArTPC on a GPU

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    The rapid development of general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) is allowing the implementation of highly-parallelized Monte Carlo simulation chains for particle physics experiments. This technique is particularly suitable for the simulation of a pixelated charge readout for time projection chambers, given the large number of channels that this technology employs. Here we present the first implementation of a full microphysical simulator of a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) equipped with light readout and pixelated charge readout, developed for the DUNE Near Detector. The software is implemented with an end-to-end set of GPU-optimized algorithms. The algorithms have been written in Python and translated into CUDA kernels using Numba, a just-in-time compiler for a subset of Python and NumPy instructions. The GPU implementation achieves a speed up of four orders of magnitude compared with the equivalent CPU version. The simulation of the current induced on 10310^3 pixels takes around 1 ms on the GPU, compared with approximately 10 s on the CPU. The results of the simulation are compared against data from a pixel-readout LArTPC prototype

    Highly-parallelized simulation of a pixelated LArTPC on a GPU

    No full text
    The rapid development of general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) is allowing the implementation of highly-parallelized Monte Carlo simulation chains for particle physics experiments. This technique is particularly suitable for the simulation of a pixelated charge readout for time projection chambers, given the large number of channels that this technology employs. Here we present the first implementation of a full microphysical simulator of a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) equipped with light readout and pixelated charge readout, developed for the DUNE Near Detector. The software is implemented with an end-to-end set of GPU-optimized algorithms. The algorithms have been written in Python and translated into CUDA kernels using Numba, a just-in-time compiler for a subset of Python and NumPy instructions. The GPU implementation achieves a speed up of four orders of magnitude compared with the equivalent CPU version. The simulation of the current induced on 10310^3 pixels takes around 1 ms on the GPU, compared with approximately 10 s on the CPU. The results of the simulation are compared against data from a pixel-readout LArTPC prototype

    The DUNE Far Detector Vertical Drift Technology, Technical Design Report