312 research outputs found

    How are Australian higher education institutions contributing to change through innovative teaching and learning in virtual worlds?

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    Over the past decade, teaching and learning in virtual worlds has been at the forefront of many higher education institutions around the world. The DEHub Virtual Worlds Working Group (VWWG) consisting of Australian and New Zealand higher education academics was formed in 2009. These educators are investigating the role that virtual worlds play in the future of education and actively changing the direction of their own teaching practice and curricula. 47 academics reporting on 28 Australian higher education institutions present an overview of how they have changed directions through the effective use of virtual worlds for diverse teaching and learning activities such as business scenarios and virtual excursions, role-play simulations, experimentation and language development. The case studies offer insights into the ways in which institutions are continuing to change directions in their teaching to meet changing demands for innovative teaching, learning and research in virtual worlds. This paper highlights the ways in which the authors are using virtual worlds to create opportunities for rich, immersive and authentic activities that would be difficult or not possible to achieve through more traditional approaches. © 2011 Brent Gregory, Sue Gregory, Denise Wood, Yvonne Masters, Mathew Hillier, Frederick Stokes-Thompson, Anton Bogdanovych, Des Butler, Lyn Hay, Jay Jay Jegathesan, Kim Flintoff, Stefan Schutt,Dale Linegar, Robyn Alderton, Andrew Cram, Ieva Stupans, Lindy McKeown Orwin, Grant Meredith, Debbie McCormick, Francesca Collins, Jenny Grenfell, Jason Zagami, Allan Ellis, Lisa Jacka, Angela Thomas, Helen Farley, Nona Muldoon, Ali Abbas, Suku Sinnappan, Katrina Neville, Ian Burnett, Ashley Aitken, Simeon Simoff, Sheila Scutter, Xiangyu Wang, Kay Souter, David Ellis, Mandy Salomon, Greg Wadley, Michael Jacobson, Anne Newstead, Gary Hayes, Scott Grant, Alyona Yusupova

    Blending TAC and BUFR Marine in Situ Data for ICOADS Near-Real-Time Release 3.0.2

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    This paper describes the new International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) near-real-time (NRT) Release, (R3.0.2), with greatly enhanced completeness over the previous version (R3.0.1). R3.0.1 had been operationally produced monthly from January 2015 onward, with input data from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Telecommunication Systems (GTS) transmissions in the Traditional Alphanumeric Codes (TAC) format. Since the release of R3.0.1, however, many observing platforms have changed, or are in the process of transitioning, to the Binary Universal Form for the Representation (BUFR) of meteorological data format. R3.0.2 combines input data from both BUFR and TAC formats. In this paper, we describe: input data sources; the BUFR decoding process for observations from drifting buoys, moored buoys, and ships; and the data quality control of the TAC and BUFR data streams. We also describe how the TAC and BUFR streams were merged to upgrade R3.0.1 into R3.0.2 with duplicates removed. Finally, we compare the number of reports and spatial coverage of essential climate variables (ECVs) between R3.0.1 and R3.0.2. ICOADS NRT R3.0.2 shows both quantitative and qualitative gains from the inclusion of BUFR reports. The number of observations in R3.0.2 increased by nearly one million reports per month, and the coverage of buoy and ship sea surface temperatures (SSTs) on monthly 2°×2° degree grids increased by 20%. The number of reported ECVs also increased in R3.0.2. For example, observations of SST and sea level pressure (SLP) increased by around 30% and 20%, respectively, as compared to R3.0.1, and salinity is a new addition to the ICOADS NRT product in R3.0.2

    Australian higher education institutions transforming the future of teaching and learning through 3d virtual worlds

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    What are educators motivations for using virtual worlds with their students? Are they using them to support the teaching of professions and if this is the case, do they introduce virtual worlds into the curriculum to develop and/or expand students' professional learning networks? Are they using virtual worlds to transform their teaching and learning? In recognition of the exciting opportunities that virtual worlds present for higher education, the DEHub Virtual Worlds Working Group was formed. It is made up of Australian university academics who are investigating the role that virtual worlds will play in the future of education and actively implementing the technology within their own teaching practice and curricula. This paper presents a typology for teaching and learning in 3D virtual worlds and applies the typology to a series of case studies based on the ways in which academics and their institutions are exploiting the power of virtual worlds for diverse purposes ranging from business scenarios and virtual excursions to role-play, experimentation and language development. The case studies offer insight into the ways in which institutions are transforming their teaching for an unknown future through innovative teaching and learning in virtual worlds. The paper demonstrates how virtual worlds enable low cost alternatives to existing pedagogies as well as creating opportunities for rich, immersive and authentic activities that would otherwise not be feasible or maybe not even be possible. Through the use of virtual worlds, teaching and learning can be transformed to cater for an unknown future. © 2010 Sue Gregory, Mark J.W. Lee, Allan Ellis, Brent Gregory, Denise Wood, Mathew Hillier, Matthew Campbell, Jenny Grenfell, Steven Pace, Helen Farley, Angela Thomas, Andrew Cram, Suku Sinnappan, Kerrie Smith, Lyn Hay, Shannon Kennedy-Clark, Ian Warren, Scott Grant, David Craven, Heinz Dreher, Carol Matthews, Deborah Murdoch & Lindy McKeown. © 2010 Sue Gregory, Mark J.W. Lee, Allan Ellis, Brent Gregory, Denise Wood, Mathew Hillier, Matthew Campbell, Jenny Grenfell, Steven Pace, Helen Farley, Angela Thomas, Andrew Cram, Suku Sinnappan, Kerrie Smith, Lyn Hay, Shannon Kennedy-Clark, Ian Warren, Scott Grant, David Craven, Heinz Dreher, Carol Matthews, Deborah Murdoch & Lindy McKeown

    ARSIS 4.0 (Augmented Reality Space Informatics System)

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    SUITS which stands for Spacesuit User Interface Technologies for Students is an ongoing challenge presented by NASA to farm software ideas and prototypes from college students around the world to create a system that can help NASA improve autonomy, efficiency and efficacy of communication between mission control and an Astronaut physically on the moon. In answer to these challenges, we have developed ARSIS 4.0 which seamlessly integrates Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality and a desktop portal to create a cohesive mixed reality experience that we are calling telepresence. The capabilities provided by ARSIS improve situational awareness and more effectively equip astronauts for the unpredictable environments they will face while helping mission control maintain a clear understanding of what is transpiring during a mission via telepresence so that they can more effectively guide and communicate with the astronaut

    ARSIS 4.0 (Augmented Reality Space Informatics System)

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    Currently astronauts on extravehicular activity (EVA) procedures use voice communication and written instructions to guide them when completing tasks. The Augmented Reality Space Informatics System 4.0 (ARSIS) is an augmented reality (AR)prototype built to improve the efficiency of EVA protocols. Developed for the Microsoft HoloLens 2 in response to the 2021NASA SUITS (Spacesuit User Interfaces for Students) challenge, ARSIS 4.0 is the 4th version of the original ARSIS application developed in 2018. This paper provides information on ARSIS 4.0 functionality and usability in EVA procedures as of 2021

    How and Why Software Outsourcing Projects Drift—An Actor-Network-Theoretic Investigation of Control Processes

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    This study seeks to explain the perplexing phenomenon that many software outsourcing projects drift, ie, they enter into a creeping process of targeting emergent goals often at the expense of losing sight of initial goals. Such drift is difficult to reconcile with the traditional logic of control found in the literature. According to this logic, clients should be able to ensure goal achievement through close monitoring. If drift occurs despite rigid control, this suggests that within the control process forces are at work that divert controls from their initial objectives. To better understand these forces in the control process and how they relate to drift, we contrast the logic of control with concepts and assumptions from actor-network theory (ANT). ANT allows us to understand the process of designing, enacting, and adapting controls as one of creating and changing actor-networks. Our longitudinal case study of four software outsourcing projects reveals that drift processes differ depending on three interconnected changes in the actor-networks, ie, changes in who partakes in the (re-) negotiation of control mechanisms, what specific control mechanisms are (re-) defined, and how they are inscribed in the software artifact and the software task
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