687 research outputs found

    W&L Law Fall Scholarship Celebration 2022

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    On October 6, 2022, the Washington and Lee Law Library hosted the fourth W&L Law Fall Scholarship Celebration. The event was co-sponsored by the Frances Lewis Law Center and took place in the Law Library\u27s main reading room from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. On display were dozens of scholarly articles, books, and chapters authored by the W&L Law faculty and student body between October 2019 and October 2022, with hundreds of additional works accessible online through the Scholarly Commons institutional repository. Faculty, librarians, staff, and administrators mingled with law students over hors d\u27oeuvres and wine to peruse the formidable scholarly output of the W&L Law community. Spouses, alumni, faculty from W&L\u27s undergraduate campus, and others with ties to the University were also in attendance. Melanie Wilson, dean of W&L Law; Christopher Seaman, director of the Frances Lewis Law Center; Andrew Christensen, Head of Digital Initiatives and Outreach; and Jenny Mitchell, Archivist and Special Collections Librarian, provided welcoming remarks, alongside W&L Law Library director Michelle Cosby, who also led all attendees in a celebratory toast. The event program, which includes a list of the scholarship on display, is available to download in PDF. Photos taken at the event are also available to view in the W&L Law Scholarly Commons Image Gallery, and a video recording of the welcoming remarks is linked above on this page

    Trans-disciplinary Collaboration to Enhance Coastal Resilience: Envisioning a National Community Modeling Initiative

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    This section presents a synthesis of the major outcomes from the coastal resilience workshops. This paper is based on the presentations and discussions that have been guided by the Chair and numerous stakeholders such as university researchers, Non Governmental Organizations, and federal, state, and local governments. SURA’s workshop series promotes collaboration and fully-integrated processes, and it should be noted that the actual workshop is only a first step; the follow-up work is likely to continue for years. The major results from this workshop relate to the development of trans-disciplinary approaches that help a community to bounce back after hazardous events such as hurricanes, coastal storms, and flooding – rather than simply rebuilding in the aftermath. The workshops have included participants from academia, industry, and government. They provide opportunity to share coastal resilience research and projects focused on helping the community to rebound quickly from climate and extreme weather related events, including sea level rise. The purpose of the paper is to showcase how social and natural scientists can collaborate to reduce the negative human health, environmental, and economic effects of coastal hazards

    Trans-disciplinary Collaboration to Enhance Coastal Resilience: Envisioning a National Community Modeling Initiative

    Get PDF
    This section presents a synthesis of the major outcomes from the coastal resilience workshops. This paper is based on the presentations and discussions that have been guided by the Chair and numerous stakeholders such as university researchers, Non Governmental Organizations, and federal, state, and local governments. SURA’s workshop series promotes collaboration and fully-integrated processes, and it should be noted that the actual workshop is only a first step; the follow-up work is likely to continue for years. The major results from this workshop relate to the development of trans-disciplinary approaches that help a community to bounce back after hazardous events such as hurricanes, coastal storms, and flooding – rather than simply rebuilding in the aftermath. The workshops have included participants from academia, industry, and government. They provide opportunity to share coastal resilience research and projects focused on helping the community to rebound quickly from climate and extreme weather related events, including sea level rise. The purpose of the paper is to showcase how social and natural scientists can collaborate to reduce the negative human health, environmental, and economic effects of coastal hazards

    Changes in soil dissolved organic carbon affect reconstructed history and projected future trends in surface water acidification

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    Preindustrial (1850s) and future (2060) streamwater chemistry of an anthropogenically acidified small catchment was estimated using the MAGIC model for three different scenarios for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and sources. The highest modeled pH = 5.7 for 1850s as well as for 2060 (pH = 4.4) was simulated given the assumption that streamwater DOC concentration was constant at the 1993 level. A scenario accounting for an increase of DOC as an inverse function of ionic strength (IS) of soilwater and streamwater resulted in much lower preindustrial (pH = 4.9) and future recovery to (pH = 4.1) if the stream riparian zone was assumed to be the only DOC source. If upland soilwater (where significant DOC increase was observed at −5 and −15 cm) was also included, DOC was partly neutralized within the soil and higher preindustrial pH = 5.3 and future pH = 4.2 were estimated. The observed DOC stream flux was 2–4 times higher than the potential carbon production of the riparian zone, implying that this is unlikely to be the sole DOC source. Modeling based on the assumption that stream DOC changes are solely attributable to changes in the riparian zone appears likely to underestimate preindustrial pH

    Assessing recovery from acidification of European surface waters in the year 2010: evaluation of projections made with the MAGIC model in 1995

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    In 1999 we used the MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater In Catchments) model to project acidification of acid-sensitive European surface waters in the year 2010, given implementation of the Gothenburg Protocol to the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP). A total of 202 sites in 10 regions in Europe were studied. These forecasts can now be compared with measurements for the year 2010, to give a “ground truth” evaluation of the model. The prerequisite for this test is that the actual sulfur and nitrogen deposition decreased from 1995 to 2010 by the same amount as that used to drive the model forecasts; this was largely the case for sulfur, but less so for nitrogen, and the simulated surface water [NO3–] reflected this difference. For most of the sites, predicted surface water recovery from acidification for the year 2010 is very close to the actual recovery observed from measured data, as recovery is predominantly driven by reductions in sulfur deposition. Overall these results show that MAGIC successfully predicts future water chemistry given known changes in acid deposition

    Glastir Monitoring & Evaluation Programme. First year annual report

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    The Welsh Government has commissioned a comprehensive new ecosystem monitoring and evaluation programme to monitor the effects of Glastir, its new land management scheme, and to monitor progress towards a range of international biodiversity and environmental targets. A random sample of 1 km squares stratified by landcover types will be used both to monitor change at a national level in the wider countryside and to provide a backdrop against which intervention measures are assessed using a second sample of 1 km squares located in areas eligible for enhanced payments for advanced interventions. Modelling in the first year has forecast change based on current understanding, whilst a rolling national monitoring programme based on an ecosystem approach will provide an evidence-base for on-going, adaptive development of the scheme by Welsh Government. To our knowledge, this will constitute the largest and most in-depth ecosystem monitoring and evaluation programme of any member state of the European Union

    Qualitative Impact Assessment of Land Management Interventions on Ecosystem Services (“QEIA”). Report-1: Executive Summary: QEIA Evidence Review & Integrated Assessment

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    The focus of this project was to provide an expert-led, rapid qualitative assessment of land management interventions on Ecosystem Services (ES) proposed for inclusion in Environmental Land Management (ELM) schemes. This involved a review of the current evidence base for 741 land management actions on 33 Ecosystem Services and 53 Ecosystem Service indicators by ten teams involving 45 experts drawn from the independent research community in a consistent series of Evidence Reviews covering the broad topics of: • Air quality • Greenhouse gas emissions • Soils • Water management • Biodiversity: croplands • Biodiversity: improved grassland • Biodiversity: semi-natural habitats • Biodiversity: integrated systems-based actions • Carbon sequestration • Cultural services (including recreation, geodiversity and regulatory services). It should be noted that this piece of work is just one element of the wider underpinning work Defra has commissioned to support the development of the ELM schemes

    Qualitative impact assessment of land management interventions on Ecosystem Services (‘QEIA’). Report-2: Integrated Assessment

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    The focus of this project was to provide an expert-led, rapid qualitative assessment of land management interventions on Ecosystem Services (ES) proposed for inclusion in Environmental Land Management (ELM) schemes. This involved a review of the current evidence base for 741 land management actions on 33 Ecosystem Services and 53 Ecosystem Service indicators by ten expert teams drawn from the independent research community in a consistent series of ten Evidence Reviews covering the broad topics of; • Air quality • Greenhouse gas emissions • Soils • Water management • Biodiversity: croplands • Biodiversity: improved grassland • Biodiversity: semi-natural habitats • Biodiversity: integrated systems-based actions • Carbon sequestration • Cultural services (including recreation, geodiversity and regulatory services) These reviews were undertaken rapidly at Defra’s request by ten teams involving 45 experts who together captured more than 2,400 individual sources of evidence. This was followed by the Integrated Assessment (IA) reported here to provide a more accessible summary of these evidence reviews with a focus on capturing the actions with the greatest potential magnitude of change for the intended ES, and their potential co-benefits and trade-offs for the other ES
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