57 research outputs found

    Legal Resources on the Trump Immigration Ban

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    This resource bibliography provides legal resources related to the litigation over the presidential immigration ban issued on Jan. 27, 2017. These resources include the executive order, key court decisions, and explanatory commentary

    Automating Bias: Cardozo Law Review 2023 Symposium

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    Click here to view the event invitation. Click here to view the recording.https://larc.cardozo.yu.edu/flyers-2022-2023/1008/thumbnail.jp

    Automating Bias: Cardozo Law Review 2023 Symposium

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    This symposium explores the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in consumer credit markets and the legal and policy issues surrounding these practices. Panel 1: Scoping Credit Discrimination in the Age of AI This panel examines how the rise of AI in consumer credit markets expands the meaning of discrimination and fairness in lending. Panel 2: Programming Fairness This panel examines technical solutions for mitigating discrimination risks in consumer credit markets arising from the use of AI. Keynote: Fair Lending and the CFPB Patrice Ficklin, Fair Lending Director, CFPB, and Carol Evans, Deputy Fair Lending Director, CFPB Panel 3: Regulating Fair Lending This panel explores regulatory responses to the discrimination and fairness risks generated by the increasing use of AI in consumer credit markets. Click here to view the flyer. Click here to view the recording.https://larc.cardozo.yu.edu/event-invitations-2023/1002/thumbnail.jp

    A Conversation with Indian Supreme Court Justice S. Ravinda Bhat

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    Join us for a conversation with Indian Supreme Court Justice Shripathi Ravindra Bhat and Professor Saurabh Vishnubhakat, Director of Cardozo’s Intellectual Property & Information Law Program. Hear about Justice Bhat\u27s experience at the highest levels of judicial service and his insight into the law’s perennial capacity for social impact. Click here to view the flyer.https://larc.cardozo.yu.edu/event-invitations-2023/1006/thumbnail.jp

    A Conversation with Indian Supreme Court Justice S. Ravinda Bhat

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    Click here to view the event invitation.https://larc.cardozo.yu.edu/flyers-2022-2023/1012/thumbnail.jp

    The Future of Voting: State Courts, Independent Legislatures & the Supreme Court

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    Election litigation in state courts has been increasing across the country, as parties challenge voting restrictions, gerrymandered districts and longstanding practices of election administration. Join the Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy and the State Democracy Research Initiative at the University of Wisconsin Law School for a conversation with Floersheimer Co-Director Professor Deborah Pearlstein and election experts Professor Richard H. Pildes (NYU School of Law), Deputy Solicitor General Judith Vale (Office of the New York State Attorney General), Professor Carolyn Shapiro (Chicago-Kent College of Law) and Ethan Herenstein (Counsel for Brennan Center’s Democracy Program) to discuss the value and consequences of state court involvement and what it means for future federal elections. Click here to view the flyer.https://larc.cardozo.yu.edu/event-invitations-2023/1017/thumbnail.jp

    AGENDA: Regulatory Takings and Resources: What Are the Constitutional Limits?

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    Sponsored by the University of Colorado\u27s Natural Resources Law Center and the Byron R. White Center for American Constitutional Study. Conference organizers, faculty and/or moderators included University of Colorado School of Law professors David H. Getches, Lawrence J. MacDonnell, Gene R. Nichol, Jr. and Mark Squillace. Governmental regulation for environmental protection and other important public purposes can affect the manner in which land and natural resources are developed and used. The U.S. constitution (and most state constitutions) prohibit the government from taking property without payment of compensation. Originally intended to apply to situations where the government physically seized private property for public use, the takings clause of the Fifth Amendment has been applied by courts to situations where the application of government regulation is deemed to have effectively taken private property. In recent years there has been an explosion of litigation asserting that certain regulatory activities by federal, state, and local government constitute such a taking of property. Much of this litigation has arisen in situations involving government regulation for what might be broadly characterized as environmental protection purposes. This conference examines the federal constitutional law of takings as it has been articulated by the U.S: Supreme Court. It then turns to a detailed consideration of the state of the law as it has developed in relation to environmental control of land and natural resources uses. In particular, speakers will discuss takings cases arising in the context of wetlands use, surface mining, public lands, water, and endangered species. Speakers include leading constitutional and resource law scholars as well as private practitioners and government attorneys involved in takings litigation

    AGENDA: Regulatory Takings and Resources: What Are the Constitutional Limits?

    Get PDF
    Sponsored by the University of Colorado\u27s Natural Resources Law Center and the Byron R. White Center for American Constitutional Study. Conference organizers, faculty and/or moderators included University of Colorado School of Law professors David H. Getches, Lawrence J. MacDonnell, Gene R. Nichol, Jr. and Mark Squillace. Governmental regulation for environmental protection and other important public purposes can affect the manner in which land and natural resources are developed and used. The U.S. constitution (and most state constitutions) prohibit the government from taking property without payment of compensation. Originally intended to apply to situations where the government physically seized private property for public use, the takings clause of the Fifth Amendment has been applied by courts to situations where the application of government regulation is deemed to have effectively taken private property. In recent years there has been an explosion of litigation asserting that certain regulatory activities by federal, state, and local government constitute such a taking of property. Much of this litigation has arisen in situations involving government regulation for what might be broadly characterized as environmental protection purposes. This conference examines the federal constitutional law of takings as it has been articulated by the U.S: Supreme Court. It then turns to a detailed consideration of the state of the law as it has developed in relation to environmental control of land and natural resources uses. In particular, speakers will discuss takings cases arising in the context of wetlands use, surface mining, public lands, water, and endangered species. Speakers include leading constitutional and resource law scholars as well as private practitioners and government attorneys involved in takings litigation

    The Fair Housing Act After 50 Years

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    https://larc.cardozo.yu.edu/event-invitations-2018/1025/thumbnail.jp
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