18,169 research outputs found

    Pressure screening and fluctuations at the bottom of a granular column

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    We report sets of precise and reproducible measurements on the static pressure at the bottom of a granular column. We make a quantitative analysis of the pressure saturation when the column height is increased. We evidence a great sensitivity of the measurements with the global packing fraction and the eventual presence of shear bands at the boundaries. We also show the limit of the classical Janssen model and discuss these experimental results under the scope of recently proposed theoretical frameworks.Comment: 17 pages, Latex, 8 eps figures, to appear in the European Physical Journal B (1999

    TOWARD A PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THE CARCASS BEEF MARKET - WEAK FORM TEST OF THE EFFICIENT MARKETS MODEL

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    Industrial Organization, Livestock Production/Industries,

    Beef Packers’ Captive Supplies: An Upward Trend? A Pricing Edge?

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    Livestock Production/Industries,

    PRODUCTIVITY-CONCENTRATION RELATIONSHIP IN THE U.S. MEATPACKING INDUSTRY

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    Previous research found a positive relationship between concentration and total factor productivity in food manufacturing. On industry (i.e., meatpacking plants [SIC 2011]) was selected for independent analysis due to a relatively sharp increase in concentration in recent years. The methodology chosen was similar to previous studies. Total factor productivity increased 2.4 percent per year, and labor productivity increased 3.3 percent per year for meatpacking plants over the 1958-82 period. Concentration in meatpacking did not positively or negatively affect total factor productivity or labor productivity over the 25-year study period.Productivity Analysis,

    COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SLAUGHTER LAMB PRICES

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    Data on weekly summaries of slaughter lamb sales in 1996 were analyzed to determine price differences for factors affecting lamb prices. Models were compared with a 1991 study and across regions. Demand and supply variables were found important as well as marketing methods, sale lot sizes, seasonal and regional variables.Livestock Production/Industries,

    AN EMPIRICAL STUDY OF COMPETITION IN THE PRICE DISCOVERY PROCESS FOR SLAUGHTER LAMBS

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    Buyer competition in the price discovery process for slaughter lambs at an Oklahoma teleauction was studied. Number of buyers positively influenced both absolute and relative sale prices but did not significantly affect buyer gross margins. Buyer market shares also affected prices paid and buyer gross margins. Thus, competition among buyers was found to be important in the price discovery process.Demand and Price Analysis, Livestock Production/Industries,

    Preferential Cattle and Hog Pricing by Packers: Evidence from Mandatory Price Reports

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    Preferential pricing was one of several concerns leading to mandatory price reporting. Seven years of “new” data from mandatory reports are examined to determine if evidence exists of preferential pricing by packers for fed cattle and slaughter hogs. Weekly data show some alternative marketing methods track closer to cash market prices than others. Some differences can be explained, while others are not as clear. Evidence was found that cash prices lead prices for alternative marketing methods on rising markets but trail them on declining markets.Alternative marketing arrangements, Cattle, Hogs, Marketing, Meatpacking procurement, Price discovery, Pricing, Livestock Production/Industries, Marketing,

    Supply Effects on Price Discovery and Pricing Choice for Fed Cattle

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    Price discovery research related to fed cattle has involved data covering a relatively small portion of the longer cattle cycle. Thus, research has not explicitly addressed the impacts alternative supply conditions have on price discovery. Additionally, little research has addressed the pricing choices for fed cattle marketing or procurement. In research reported here using data from an experimental market, the Fed Cattle Market Simulator, models were estimated that encompassed live weight, dressed weight, and grid pricing under alternative supply scenarios, specifically a larger supply and smaller supply period. Variables explaining fed cattle price variation differed somewhat between the two supply periods. For the two periods combined, results were nearly as theoretically expected. One consistent finding was that higher quality fed cattle marketed with a grid brought higher prices in both supply periods. Similarly, some differences were noted in the pricing choice model between the two periods and the combined periods. Another consistent finding was that having lower quality cattle to market increased the probability of marketing them on a live weight basis. Higher quality cattle were more apt to be marketed with a grid.Livestock Production/Industries,
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