1,963 research outputs found

    Overview of data acquisition for LHC

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    Trigger and data-acquisition techniques overview

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    1) Introduction : CERN Spbarp-S collider (UA1) ; Trigger and Digital Signal Processing (DSP). 2) CERN LHC Super Collider : Rate and data volume ; Data acquisition at LHC ; Front end, trigger levels (technologies, readout and computing, software)

    Trigger and data acquisition at Large Hadron Collider

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    LHC Communication Infrastructure: Recommendations from the working group

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    The LHC Working Group for Communication Infrastructure (CIWG) was established in May 1999 with members from the accelerator sector, the LHC physics experiments, the general communication services, the technical services and other LHC working groups. It has spent a year collecting user requirements and at the same time explored and evaluated possible solutions appropriate to the LHC. A number of technical recommendations were agreed, and areas where more work is required were identified. The working group also put forward proposals for organizational changes needed to allow the design project to continue and to prepare for the installation and commissioning phase of the LHC communication infrastructure. This paper reports on the work done and explains the motivation behind the recommendations

    The CMS event builder demonstrator based on Myrinet

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    The data acquisition system for the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will require a large and high performance event building network. Several switch technologies are currently being evaluated in order to compare different architectures for the event builder. One candidate is Myrinet. This paper describes the demonstrator which has been set up to study a small-scale (8*8) event builder based on a Myrinet switch. Measurements are presented on throughput, overhead and scaling for various traffic conditions. Results are shown on event building with a push architecture. (6 refs)

    Readout system test benches

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    We propose to develop and exploit versatile multi-purpose Personal Computer-based Test Benches to support the evaluation and design of the basic elements required for digital front-end readout and data transmission systems for an LHC experiment. These test benches will have modular hardware facilities for the operation of new readout system components under realistic conditions, and will implement advanced modern software engineering concepts. They will support components such as fast ADCs, hybrid fibre-optic transceivers, and the prototype VLSI systolic array and data-flow processors currently being developed in national research laboratories and by the emerging European HDTV industry. These efforts would also lay the foundations for projects involving the development of custom-designed VLSI circuits

    A software approach for readout and data acquisition in CMS

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    Traditional systems dominated by performance constraints tend to neglect other qualities such as maintainability and configurability. Object-Orientation allows one to encapsulate the technology differences in communication sub-systems and to provide a uniform view of data transport layer to the systems engineer. We applied this paradigm to the design and implementation of intelligent data servers in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) data acquisition system at CERN to easily exploiting the physical communication resources of the available equipment. CMS is a high-energy physics experiment under study that incorporates a highly distributed data acquisition system. This paper outlines the architecture of one part, the so called Readout Unit, and shows how we can exploit the object advantage for systems with specific data rate requirements. A C++ streams communication layer with zero copying functionality has been established for UDP, TCP, DLPI and specific Myrinet and VME bus communication on the VxWorks real-time operating system. This software provides performance close to the hardware channel and hides communication details from the application programmers. (28 refs)
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