177 research outputs found

    Percepciones de los ni√Īos y ni√Īas sobre la experiencia de juego y el aprendizaje con Nintendo Labo: m√ļltiples experiencias de ‚Äúhacer y jugar‚ÄĚ

    Get PDF
    Este art√≠culo explora las percepciones de ni√Īos y ni√Īas que tuvieron la oportunidad de explorar las fases de ‚ÄúHacer‚ÄĚ y ‚ÄúJugar‚ÄĚ del Kit de variedad ‚ÄúToy-Con 01‚ÄĚ del Nintendo Labo. A trav√©s de aspectos claves como el involucramiento/compromiso estudiantil, la utilizaci√≥n del conocimiento y la adquisici√≥n de nuevos conceptos (Gee, 2008), este art√≠culo ampl√≠a la comprensi√≥n general de c√≥mo los videojuegos pueden generar un aprendizaje activo. A partir de las experiencias en la construcci√≥n de proyectos de ‚ÄúHazlo t√ļ mismo‚ÄĚ, los autores analizan c√≥mo los ni√Īos, a trav√©s de cuatro casos diferentes, conectaron sus conocimientos y experiencias previas con contenido relacionado con la ciencia (impl√≠cito en las interacciones y el hardware de la consola Nintendo Switch y el software Nintendo Labo y piezas de cart√≥n). Las limitaciones del estudio sugieren que se necesita m√°s tiempo para tener una exploraci√≥n m√°s profunda de las percepciones de los ni√Īos explorando la fase ‚ÄúDescubrir‚ÄĚ‚ÄĒla tercera y √ļltima fase de Nintendo Labo

    Feasibility Study to Assess Medical Student Visits to Developmentally Disabled Adults

    Get PDF
    Introduction The Probate Court of Kalamazoo appoints guardians to minors removed from the custody of their parents and to legally incapacitated or disabled adults. The state mandates that any child under age six placed into a guardianship be visited at least once a year to ensure proper care of the child, but there is no such mandate for the approximately 300 developmentally disabled (DD) adults under the care of the Probate Court. The purpose of this ongoing study is to determine the feasibility of annual visits to DD individuals conducted by volunteer medical students. Methods In this feasibility study, the parameters which involve medical students include the number of visits conducted to DD adults, time spent reviewing cases, travel time to and from the visitation site, time spent conducting the visit and completing the required court paperwork, and safety. For the Probate Court Staff we assessed the time spent training students, and preparation time prior to and after visitation. Results We collected data over 17 months, visiting DD wards on six separate occasions, totaling 32 DD adults in 12 homes. On average, we spent 38.4 minutes per location. Over the six occasions, we spent a total of 7.7 hours traveling, 6.1 hours preparing, 6.9 hours visiting wards, and 21 minutes finalizing reports, for a total of 21 hours to complete 32 visits. The average safety rating for these visits was 9.3/10, with a minimum safety of 7/10. Despite the short study, our results indicate that this is a feasible and worthwhile program. We were able to conduct 32 DD visits, which would not have been conducted without our participation. While the court needed 73.3 hours to prepare and review the cases, we saved the Probate Court at least 21 hours of home visitation time. Safety was not a major concern for a large majority of the homes, in part because of the use of a buddy system. Conclusion We believe that continuing program would be a valuable contribution to Probate Court. We suggest that this project continues as a longitudinal, comprehensive study that will assess not only feasibility, but outcomes and benefits of using medical students in particular. In the future we anticipate that the amount of hours contributed by medical students will increase, as a significant portion of our time was spent designing the study and defining its parameters

    Exponential dichotomies of evolution operators in Banach spaces

    Full text link
    This paper considers three dichotomy concepts (exponential dichotomy, uniform exponential dichotomy and strong exponential dichotomy) in the general context of non-invertible evolution operators in Banach spaces. Connections between these concepts are illustrated. Using the notion of Green function, we give necessary conditions and sufficient ones for strong exponential dichotomy. Some illustrative examples are presented to prove that the converse of some implication type theorems are not valid

    A national priority: LIS faculty and students as library advocates

    Get PDF
    Library advocacy is a long-standing tradition at UNCG‚Äôs Department of Library and Information Science. The LIS faculty take leadership roles in advocacy and legislation both at state and national levels and make it a point to engage students in their efforts as part their students‚Äô learning experience while earning the MLIS. Over the years, practicum and independent research studies have been offered and student interns have served for years as the backbone of advocacy efforts for the state under the supervision of faculty including overseeing the North Carolina Library Advocacy‚Äôs website (nclibraryadvocacy.org) and social media, helping coordinate state and legislative days, and helping schedule visits with members of Congress. ALA‚Äôs Committee on Library Advocacy discovered this educational partnership and has identified student advocacy internships in LIS programs as a high priority win-win advocacy activity for 2020-2021. What better way to learn about advocacy in your master‚Äôs program then to actually do advocacy as an internship experience? What better way to add young, strong advocates to speak on behalf of libraries then by having them earn credit as part of their degree? Student Perspectives What did you learn in terms of the current state of advocacy for libraries during our internship? Synergistic thought Organizational support is essential. Synergistic thinking among library associations partnered with a more collaborative approach are critically important and often lacking in North Carolina‚Äôs advocacy efforts according to former North Carolina Advocacy and Legislation Committee interns. Organizations within the state who operate as independent entities, as opposed to elements in a wider scheme, hinder the growth and success of the whole. Discrepancy in the support that library associations receive is evident. Helping library associations recognize the importance of library advocacy critical as is aligning advocacy goals with the agenda of each organization. Dawn Haney, former committee intern observed ‚ÄúThere should be a regular system of ‚Äúcheck ins‚ÄĚ with leaders of the organizations about convergence points of interest, for example, increasing the funding of libraries within North Carolina. It should be formal and regular - once quarterly at least - to discuss progress toward shared goals.‚ÄĚ Haney feels that formal division of labor toward a collaborative goal would be helpful within NC‚Äôs advocacy organizations. Convincing library organizations to take on the task of advocating for libraries is essential and should not be taken for granted. Lack of communication and unity. Continuity is a challenge and an area for future development. Creating a sense of overall community and a shared vision would have an enormous impact on the efficacy of library advocacy in North Carolina. What best practices proved to be most beneficial to our efforts? Developing a network Finding library supporters to advocate for you should be the most important goal for any advocacy organization. Librarians consider their work to be essential and can often speak eloquently on this subject. This is a relevant aspect of advocacy but in some instances the importance of libraries is best illustrated by those who have personally benefited from the existence of a library. Advocate to every level of the hierarchy, some of which can only be done at a highly localized level leading to the need for a large network of advocates. When formulating advocacy goals every aspect of the hierarchy that you wish to advocate to should be considered. Decisions are made on every level. A legislator may become more amenable to the idea of increased library funding after a successful library visit but this change of mindset is somewhat irrelevant if, in fact, the city council makes all funding decisions. Former intern Martha McGehee cites the importance of developing a large network of advocates, ‚Äúinvolve as many people as possible. Increased participation increases investment as well as awareness. A large team willing to advocate for a library also illustrates support for the library in question. Each advocate brings a unique and valuable perspective to the effort. Our Panel The panel will include Dr. Anthony Chow, Associate Professor at UNCG‚Äôs Department of Library and Information Science who is also Co-Chair of Advocacy and Legislation with the North Carolina Library Association (NCLA) and a member of ALA‚Äôs Committee on Library Advocacy; Martha McGehee and Ashley Conte, former student advocacy interns; Megan Cusick, ALA‚Äôs Assistant Director, State Advocacy; and Justin de la Cruz, Chair, ALA‚Äôs Committee on Library Advocacy (COLA). Our panel addresses the conference theme of ‚ÄúCrafting a Resilient Future: Leadership, Education, & Inspiration‚ÄĚ by bringing together LIS faculty, students, alumni, and ALA advocacy staff to discuss how we can work closer together and provide a win-win-win scenario where students support statewide and national advocacy efforts, LIS faculty can leverage the current need to advocate for libraries as an experiential learning opportunity, and students learn first hand how to advocate for themselves and libraries

    Vitrification within a nanoliter volume : oocyte and embryo cryopreservation within a 3D photopolymerized device

    Get PDF
    Open Access funding enabled and organized by CAUL and its Member ÔĽŅInstitutions. KRD is supported by a Mid-Career Fellowship from the Hospital Research Foundation (C-MCF-58‚Äď2019). KD acknowledges funding from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (grants EP/P030017/1). This study was funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CE140100003).Purpose Vitrification permits long-term banking of oocytes and embryos. It is a technically challenging procedure requiring direct handling and movement of cells between potentially cytotoxic cryoprotectant solutions. Variation in adherence to timing, and ability to trace cells during the procedure, affects survival post-warming. We hypothesized that minimizing direct handling will simplify the procedure and improve traceability. To address this, we present a novel photopolymerized device that houses the sample during vitrification. Methods The fabricated device consisted of two components: the Pod and Garage. Single mouse oocytes or embryos were housed in a Pod, with multiple Pods docked into a Garage. The suitability of the device for cryogenic application was assessed by repeated vitrification and warming cycles. Oocytes or early blastocyst-stage embryos were vitrified either using standard practice or within Pods and a Garage and compared to non-vitrified control groups. Post-warming, we assessed survival rate, oocyte developmental potential (fertilization and subsequent development) and metabolism (autofluorescence). Results Vitrification within the device occurred within‚ÄČ~‚ÄČ3 nL of cryoprotectant: this volume being‚ÄČ~‚ÄČ1000-fold lower than standard vitrification. Compared to standard practice, vitrification and warming within our device showed no differences in viability, developmental competency, or metabolism for oocytes and embryos. The device housed the sample during processing, which improved traceability and minimized handling. Interestingly, vitrification-warming itself, altered oocyte and embryo metabolism. Conclusion The Pod and Garage system minimized the volume of cryoprotectant at vitrification‚ÄĒby‚ÄČ~‚ÄČ1000-fold‚ÄĒimproved traceability and reduced direct handling of the sample. This is a major step in simplifying the procedure.Publisher PDFPeer reviewe

    Mechanotransductive feedback control of endothelial cell motility and vascular morphogenesis

    Get PDF
    Vascular morphogenesis requires persistent endothelial cell motility that is responsive to diverse and dynamic mechanical stimuli. Here, we interrogated the mechanotransductive feedback dynamics that govern endothelial cell motility and vascular morphogenesis. We show that the transcriptional regulators, YAP and TAZ, are activated by mechanical cues to transcriptionally limit cytoskeletal and focal adhesion maturation, forming a conserved mechanotransductive feedback loop that mediates human endothelial cell motility in vitro and zebrafish intersegmental vessel (ISV) morphogenesis in vivo. This feedback loop closes in 4 hours, achieving cytoskeletal equilibrium in 8 hours. Feedback loop inhibition arrested endothelial cell migration in vitro and ISV morphogenesis in vivo. Inhibitor washout at 3 hrs, prior to feedback loop closure, restored vessel growth, but washout at 8 hours, longer than the feedback timescale, did not, establishing lower and upper bounds for feedback kinetics in vivo. Mechanistically, YAP and TAZ induced transcriptional suppression of myosin II activity to maintain dynamic cytoskeletal equilibria. Together, these data establish the mechanoresponsive dynamics of a transcriptional feedback loop necessary for persistent endothelial cell migration and vascular morphogenesis

    The effect of discrete wavelengths of visible light on the developing murine embryo

    Get PDF
    Open Access funding enabled and organized by CAUL and its Member Institutions KRD is supported by a Mid-Career Fellowship from the Hospital Research Foundation (C-MCF-58‚Äď2019). KD is supported by funding from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EP/P030017/1) and the Australian Research Council (FL210100099). CC acknowledges the support of a PhD scholarship jointly from the University of Adelaide and University of Nottingham. This study was funded by the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CE140100003). PR acknowledges funding through the RMIT Vice-Chancellor‚Äôs Research Fellowship and ARC DECRA Fellowship scheme (DE200100279).Purpose A current focus of the IVF field is non-invasive imaging of the embryo to quantify developmental potential. Such approaches use varying wavelengths to gain maximum biological information. The impact of irradiating the developing embryo with discrete wavelengths of light is not fully understood. Here, we assess the impact of a range of wavelengths on the developing embryo. Methods Murine preimplantation embryos were exposed daily to wavelengths within the blue, green, yellow, and red spectral bands and compared to an unexposed control group. Development to blastocyst, DNA damage, and cell number/allocation to blastocyst cell lineages were assessed. For the longer wavelengths (yellow and red), pregnancy/fetal outcomes and the abundance of intracellular lipid were investigated. Results Significantly fewer embryos developed to the blastocyst stage when exposed to the yellow wavelength. Elevated DNA damage was observed within embryos exposed to blue, green, or red wavelengths. There was no effect on blastocyst cell number/lineage allocation for all wavelengths except red, where there was a significant decrease in total cell number. Pregnancy rate was significantly reduced when embryos were irradiated with the red wavelength. Weight at weaning was significantly higher when embryos were exposed to yellow or red wavelengths. Lipid abundance was significantly elevated following exposure to the yellow wavelength. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the impact of light is wavelength-specific, with longer wavelengths also impacting the embryo. We also show that effects are energy-dependent. This data shows that damage is multifaceted and developmental rate alone may not fully reflect the impact of light exposure.Publisher PDFPeer reviewe

    A descriptive study of the clinical impacts on COVID-19 survivors using telemonitoring (The TeleCOVID Study)

    Get PDF
    BackgroundThere is increasing evidence that COVID-19 survivors are at increased risk of experiencing a wide range of cardiovascular complications post infection; however, there are no validated models or clear guidelines for remotely monitoring the cardiac health of COVID-19 survivors.ObjectiveThis study aims to test a virtual, in-home healthcare monitoring model of care for detection of clinical symptoms and impacts on COVID-19 survivors. It also aims to demonstrate system usability and feasibility.MethodsThis open label, prospective, descriptive study was conducted in South Western Sydney. Included in the study were patients admitted to the hospital with the diagnosis of COVID-19 between June 2021 and November 2021. Eligible participants after consent were provided with a pulse oximeter to measure oxygen saturation and a S-Patch EX to monitor their electrocardiogram (ECG) for a duration of 3 months. Data was transmitted in real-time to a mobile phone via Bluetooth technology and results were sent to the study team via a cloud-based platform. All the data was reviewed in a timely manner by the investigator team, for post COVID-19 related symptoms, such as reduction in oxygen saturation and arrhythmia.Outcome measureThis study was designed for feasibility in real clinical setting implementation, enabling the study team to develop and utilise a virtual, in-home healthcare monitoring model of care to detect post COVID-19 clinical symptoms and impacts on COVID-19 survivors.ResultsDuring the study period, 23 patients provided consent for participation. Out of which 19 patients commenced monitoring. Sixteen patients with 81 (73.6%) valid tests were included in the analysis and amongst them seven patients were detected by artificial intelligence to have cardiac arrhythmias but not clinically symptomatic. The patients with arrhythmias had a higher occurrence of supraventricular ectopy, and most of them took at least 2 tests before detection. Notably, patients with arrhythmia had significantly more tests than those without [t-test, t (13)‚ÄČ=‚ÄČ2.29, p‚ÄČ<‚ÄČ0.05].ConclusionsPreliminary observations have identified cardiac arrhythmias on prolonged cardiac monitoring in 7 out of the first 16 participants who completed their 3 months follow-up. This has allowed early escalation to their treating doctors for further investigations and early interventions

    Ovarian reserve diminished by oral cyclophosphamide therapy for granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's)

    Full text link
    Objective Standard treatment for severe granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's) (GPA) is daily oral cyclophosphamide (CYC), a cytotoxic agent associated with ovarian failure. In this study, we assessed the rate of diminished ovarian reserve in women with GPA who received CYC versus methotrexate (MTX). Methods Patients in the Wegener's Granulomatosis Etanercept Trial received either daily CYC or weekly MTX and were randomized to etanercept or placebo. For all women ages <50 years, plasma samples taken at baseline or early in the study were evaluated against samples taken later in the study to compare levels of anti‚ÄźM√ľllerian hormone (AMH) and follicle‚Äźstimulating hormone (FSH), endocrine markers of remaining egg supply. Diminished ovarian reserve was defined as an AMH level of <1.0 ng/ml. Results Of 42 women in this analysis (mean age 35 years), 24 had CYC exposure prior to enrollment and 28 received the drug during the study. At study entry, women with prior CYC exposure had significantly lower AMH, higher FSH, and a higher rate of early menstruation cessation. For women with normal baseline ovarian function, 6 of 8 who received CYC during the trial developed diminished ovarian reserve, compared to 0 of 4 who did not receive CYC ( P < 0.05). Changes in AMH correlated inversely with cumulative CYC dose ( P < 0.01), with a 0.74 ng/ml decline in AMH level for each 10 gm of CYC. Conclusion Daily oral CYC, even when administered for less than 6 months, causes diminished ovarian reserve, as indicated by low AMH levels. These data highlight the need for alternative treatments for GPA in women of childbearing age.Peer Reviewedhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/88079/1/20605_ftp.pd

    Population-level impact and herd effects following the introduction of human papillomavirus vaccination programmes: updated systematic review and meta-analysis

    Get PDF
    Background More than 10 years have elapsed since human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was implemented. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis of the population-level impact of vaccinating girls and women against human papillomavirus on HPV infections, anogenital wart diagnoses, and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ (CIN2+)to summarise the most recent evidence about the effectiveness of HPV vaccines in real-world settings and to quantify the impact of multiple age-cohort vaccination.Methods In this updated systematic review and meta-analysis, we used the same search strategy as in our previous paper. We searched MEDLINE and Embase for studies published between Feb 1, 2014, and Oct 11, 2018. Studies were eligible if they compared the frequency (prevalence or incidence) of at least one HPV-related endpoint (genital HPV infections, anogenital wart diagnoses, or histologically confirmed CIN2+) between pre-vaccination and post-vaccination periods among the general population and if they used the same population sources and recruitment methods before and after vaccination. Our primary assessment was the relative risk (RR) comparing the frequency (prevalence or incidence) of HPV-related endpoints between the pre-vaccination and post-vaccination periods. We stratified all analyses by sex, age, and years since introduction of HPV vaccination. We used random-effects models to estimate pooled relative risks.Findings We identified 1702 potentially eligible articles for this systematic review and meta-analysis, and included 65 articles in 14 high-income countries: 23 for HPV infection, 29 for anogenital warts, and 13 for CIN2+.After 5\u20138 years of vaccination, the prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 decreased significantly by 83% (RR 0\ub717, 95% CI 0\ub711\u20130\ub725) among girls aged 13\u201319 years, and decreased significantly by 66% (RR 0\ub734, 95% CI 0\ub723\u20130\ub749) among women aged 20\u201324 years. The prevalence of HPV 31, 33, and 45 decreased significantly by 54% (RR 0\ub746, 95% CI 0\ub733\u20130\ub766) among girls aged 13\u201319 years. Anogenital wart diagnoses decreased significantly by 67% (RR 0\ub733, 95% CI 0\ub724\u20130\ub746) among girls aged 15\u201319 years, decreased significantly by 54% (RR 0\ub746, 95% CI 0.36\u20130.60) among women aged 20\u201324 years, and decreased significantly by 31% (RR 0\ub769, 95% CI 0\ub753\u20130\ub789) among women aged 25\u201329 years. Among boys aged 15\u201319 years anogenital wart diagnoses decreased significantly by 48% (RR 0\ub752, 95% CI 0\ub737\u20130\ub775) and among men aged 20\u201324 years they decreased significantly by 32% (RR 0\ub768, 95% CI 0\ub747\u20130\ub798). After 5\u20139 years of vaccination, CIN2+ decreased significantly by 51% (RR 0\ub749, 95% CI 0\ub742\u20130\ub758) among screened girls aged 15\u201319 years and decreased significantly by 31% (RR 0\ub769, 95% CI 0\ub757\u20130\ub784) among women aged 20\u201324 years.Interpretation This updated systematic review and meta-analysis includes data from 60 million individuals and up to 8 years of post-vaccination follow-up. Our results show compelling evidence of the substantial impact of HPV vaccination programmes on HPV infections and CIN2+ among girls and women, and on anogenital warts diagnoses among girls, women, boys, and men. Additionally, programmes with multi-cohort vaccination and high vaccination coverage had a greater direct impact and herd effects
    • ‚Ķ
    corecore