226 research outputs found

    The e-Science Paradigm for Particle Physics

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    Heavy Flavor Physics through e-Science

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    Heavy flavor physics is an important element in understanding the nature of physics. The accurate knowledge of properties of heavy flavor physics plays an essential role for the determination of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. Asymmetric-energy e+e- B factories (BaBar and Belle) run their operation and will upgrade B factories to become super Belle. The size of available B meson samples will be dramatically increased. Also the data size of Tevatron experiments (CDF, D0) are on the order of PetaByte. Therefore we use new concept of e-Science for heavy flavor physics. This concept is about studying heavy flavor physics anytime and anywhere even if we are not on-site of accelerator laboratories and data size is immense. The component of this concept is data production, data processing and data analysis anytime and anywhere. We apply this concept to current CDF experiment at Tevatron. We will expand this concept to Super Belle and LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments which will achieve an accuracy of measurements in the next decades.Comment: 16 pages, 2 figure

    A Study of Double Dark Photons Produced by Lepton Colliders using High Performance Computing

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    The universe is thought to be filled with not only Standard Model (SM) matters but also dark matters. Dark matter is thought to play a major role in its construction. However, the identity of dark matter is as yet unknown, with various search methods from astrophysical observartion to particle collider experiments. Because of the cross-section that is a thousand times smaller than SM particles, dark matter research requires a large amount of data processing. Therefore, optimization and parallelization in High Performance Computing is required. Dark matter in hypothetical hidden sector is though to be connected to dark photons which carries forces similar to photons in electromagnetism. In the recent analysis, it was studied using the decays of a dark photon at collider experiments. Based on this, we studies double dark photon decays at lepton colliders. The signal channels are e+e– → AʹAʹ and e+e– → AʹAʹγ where dark photon Aʹ decays dimuon. These signal channels are based on the theory that dark photons only decay into heavily charged leptons, which can explain the muon magnetic momentum anomaly. We scanned the cross-section according to the dark photon mass in experiments. MadGraph5 was used to generate events based on a simplified model. Additionally, to get the maximum expected number of events for the double dark photon channel, the detector efficiency for several center of mass (CM) energy were studied using Delphes and MadAnalysis5 for performance comparison. The results of this study will contribute to the search for double dark photon channels at lepton colliders

    Geant4 simulation model of electromagnetic processes in oriented crystals for the accelerator physics

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    Electromagnetic processes of charged particles interaction with oriented crystals provide a wide variety of innovative applications such as beam steering, crystal-based extraction/collimation of leptons and hadrons in an accelerator, a fixed-target experiment on magnetic and electric dipole moment measurement, X-ray and gamma radiation source for radiotherapy and nuclear physics and a positron source for lepton and muon colliders, a compact crystalline calorimeter as well as plasma acceleration in the crystal media. One of the main challenges is to develop an up-to-date, universal and fast simulation tool to simulate these applications. We present a new simulation model of electromagnetic processes in oriented crystals implemented into Geant4, which is a toolkit for the simulation of the passage of particles through matter. We validate the model with the experimental data as well as discuss the advantages and perspectives of this model for the applications of oriented crystals mentioned above.Comment: 18 pages, 9 figure

    Combined Forward-Backward Asymmetry Measurements in Top-Antitop Quark Production at the Tevatron

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    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron have measured the asymmetry between yields of forward- and backward-produced top and antitop quarks based on their rapidity difference and the asymmetry between their decay leptons. These measurements use the full data sets collected in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of s=1.96\sqrt s =1.96 TeV. We report the results of combinations of the inclusive asymmetries and their differential dependencies on relevant kinematic quantities. The combined inclusive asymmetry is AFBttˉ=0.128±0.025A_{\mathrm{FB}}^{t\bar{t}} = 0.128 \pm 0.025. The combined inclusive and differential asymmetries are consistent with recent standard model predictions

    e-Science Paradigm for Astroparticle Physics at KISTI

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    The Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information (KISTI) has been studying the e-Science paradigm. With its successful application to particle physics, we consider the application of the paradigm to astroparticle physics. The Standard Model of particle physics is still not considered perfect even though the Higgs boson has recently been discovered. Astrophysical evidence shows that dark matter exists in the universe, hinting at new physics beyond the Standard Model. Therefore, there are efforts to search for dark matter candidates using direct detection, indirect detection, and collider detection. There are also efforts to build theoretical models for dark matter. Current astroparticle physics involves big investments in theories and computing along with experiments. The complexity of such an area of research is explained within the framework of the e-Science paradigm. The idea of the e-Science paradigm is to unify experiment, theory, and computing. The purpose is to study astroparticle physics anytime and anywhere. In this paper, an example of the application of the paradigm to astrophysics is presented

    Computational Science-based Research on Dark Matter at KISTI

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    The Standard Model of particle physics was established after discovery of the Higgs boson. However, little is known about dark matter, which has mass and constitutes approximately five times the number of standard model particles in space. The cross-section of dark matter is much smaller than that of the existing Standard Model, and the range of the predicted mass is wide, from a few eV to several PeV. Therefore, massive amounts of astronomical, accelerator, and simulation data are required to study dark matter, and efficient processing of these data is vital. Computational science, which can combine experiments, theory, and simulation, is thus necessary for dark matter research. A computational science and deep learning-based dark matter research platform is suggested for enhanced coverage and sharing of data. Such an approach can efficiently add to our existing knowledge on the mystery of dark matter

    A Study of Dark Photon at the Electron-Positron Collider Experiments Using KISTI-5 Supercomputer

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    The universe is well known to be consists of dark energy, dark matter and the standard model (SM) particles. The dark matter dominates the density of matter in the universe. The dark matter is thought to be linked with dark photon which are hypothetical hidden sector particles similar to photons in electromagnetism but potentially proposed as force carriers. Due to the extremely small cross-section of dark matter, a large amount of data is needed to be processed. Therefore, we need to optimize the central processing unit (CPU) time. In this work, using MadGraph5 as a simulation tool kit, we examined the CPU time, and cross-section of dark matter at the electron-positron collider considering three parameters including the center of mass energy, dark photon mass, and coupling constant. The signal process pertained to a dark photon, which couples only to heavy leptons. We only dealt with the case of dark photon decaying into two muons. We used the simplified model which covers dark matter particles and dark photon particles as well as the SM particles. To compare the CPU time of simulation, one or more cores of the KISTI-5 supercomputer of Nurion Knights Landing and Skylake and a local Linux machine were used. Our results can help optimize high-energy physics software through high-performance computing and enable the users to incorporate parallel processing
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