206 research outputs found

    A Study on User Preferential Choices about Rating Scales

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    Property-based Semantic Similarity: What Counts?

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    Fictional Game Elements: Critical Perspectives on Gamification Design

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    Gamification has been widely accepted in the HCI community in the last few years. However, the current debate is focused on its short-term consequences, such as effectiveness and usefulness, while its side-effects, long-term criticalities and systemic impacts are rarely raised. This workshop will explore the gamification design space from a critical perspective, by using design fictions to help researchers reflect on the long-term consequences of their designs

    Quantified Self and Modeling of Human Cognition

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    Personalized Spatial Support for People with Autism Spectrum Disorder

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    How to deal with negative preferences in recommender systems: a theoretical framework

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    An experimental study in cross-representation mediation of user models

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    Granular semantic user similarity in the presence of sparse data

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    Finding similar users in social communities is often challenging, especially in the presence of sparse data or when working with heterogeneous or specialized domains. When computing semantic similarity among users it is desirable to have a measure which allows to compare users w.r.t. any concept in the domain. We propose such a technique which reduces the problems caused by data sparsity, especially in the cold start phase, and enables granular and context-based adaptive suggestions. It allows referring to a certain set of most similar users in relation to a particular concept when a user needs suggestions about a certain topic (e.g. cultural events) and to a possibly completely different set when the user is interested in another topic (e.g. sport events). Our approach first uses a variation of the spreading activation technique to propagate the users’ interests on their corresponding ontology-based user models, and then computes the concept-biased cosine similarity (CBC similarity), a variation of the cosine similarity designed for privileging a particular concept in an ontology. CBC similarity can be used in many adaptation techniques to improve suggestions to users. We include an empirical evaluation on a collaborative filtering algorithm, showing that the CBC similarity works better than the cosine similarity when dealing with sparse data

    Editorial of the special issue on quantified self and personal informatics

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    In recent years, we witnessed the spreading of a plethora of wearable and mobile technologies allowing for a continuous and “transparent” gathering of personal data [...
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