14 research outputs found

    Boys' and girls' experiences on school well-being in lower secondary schools

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    Relevance of the topic: The well-being of pupils in our society has been declining. The boys and girls are involved in activities that are not having a good impact on their growth and development both at home and at school. This situation has caused poor pupil-pupil relationship, poor teacher-pupil relationship and a decrease in life satisfaction. Hence, the pupils' health and well-being are being affected. This need to be addressed by rectifying the problem. The boys and girls tend to have a different view on many aspects of life, and it is possible that their views on school well-being may differ. Hence, the need to study boys' and girls' experiences on well-being in lower secondary school to help in their growth and development. Objective: To examine boys' and girls' experiences on school well-being in lower secondary schools. Methods: The current study consisted of 100 pupils from lower secondary schools in different parts of Finland. The data was collected from 2014 to 2015 and included both boys and girls. The survey was focused on school well-being and the data was collected through School Well-being evaluation tool. The pupils had to express their views about the best features in their schools and the things in their schools that need improvement. The questionnaires on school well-being were filled on the internet in their schools. The thematic analysis approach was used, which is a qualitative method that involves six stages of analysis to produce the results. Results: The boys' and girls' experiences on school well-being in lower secondary schools were quite similar in some areas. Their experiences on the best features in the schools and things in their schools that need improvement had some differences. The girls' best features in the schools were mainly facilities in the schools and food whereas the boys were mainly community and lessons. The girls were dominant for improvements in facilities and temperatures whereas the boys were dominant for improvement in food and feelings. Overall the pupils seemed to be satisfied with the school environment because they all had responses for the best features in their schools but not responses to things that need improvement. Conclusion: The pupils in lower secondary school growth and development are important. A proper environment for them to develop and grow is essential. Hence, there is need to consider the experiences of both boys and girls on the best features in their schools and things that need improvement as a method for promoting school well-being

    Boys' and girls' experiences on school well-being in lower secondary schools

    Get PDF
    Relevance of the topic: The well-being of pupils in our society has been declining. The boys and girls are involved in activities that are not having a good impact on their growth and development both at home and at school. This situation has caused poor pupil-pupil relationship, poor teacher-pupil relationship and a decrease in life satisfaction. Hence, the pupils' health and well-being are being affected. This need to be addressed by rectifying the problem. The boys and girls tend to have a different view on many aspects of life, and it is possible that their views on school well-being may differ. Hence, the need to study boys' and girls' experiences on well-being in lower secondary school to help in their growth and development. Objective: To examine boys' and girls' experiences on school well-being in lower secondary schools. Methods: The current study consisted of 100 pupils from lower secondary schools in different parts of Finland. The data was collected from 2014 to 2015 and included both boys and girls. The survey was focused on school well-being and the data was collected through School Well-being evaluation tool. The pupils had to express their views about the best features in their schools and the things in their schools that need improvement. The questionnaires on school well-being were filled on the internet in their schools. The thematic analysis approach was used, which is a qualitative method that involves six stages of analysis to produce the results. Results: The boys' and girls' experiences on school well-being in lower secondary schools were quite similar in some areas. Their experiences on the best features in the schools and things in their schools that need improvement had some differences. The girls' best features in the schools were mainly facilities in the schools and food whereas the boys were mainly community and lessons. The girls were dominant for improvements in facilities and temperatures whereas the boys were dominant for improvement in food and feelings. Overall the pupils seemed to be satisfied with the school environment because they all had responses for the best features in their schools but not responses to things that need improvement. Conclusion: The pupils in lower secondary school growth and development are important. A proper environment for them to develop and grow is essential. Hence, there is need to consider the experiences of both boys and girls on the best features in their schools and things that need improvement as a method for promoting school well-being

    The Effect of Repeated Intramuscular Alfentanil Injections on Experimental Pain and Abuse Liability Indices in Healthy Males

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    OBJECTIVE: Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), increased sensitivity to noxious stimuli following repeated opioid exposures, has been demonstrated in pre-clinical studies. However, there is no accepted, prospective model of OIH following repeated opioid exposures currently available in humans. This study assessed a potential prospective OIH model. METHODS: Double-blind intramuscular (IM) injections of a short-acting opioid, (alfentanil 15 mcg/kg; N=8) were compared to active placebo (diphenhydramine 25 mg; N=3) on cold and pressure pain testing and standard abuse liability measures in eight 10-hour sessions (1 injection/session) over 4–5 weeks in healthy pain-free males. Decreases from session baseline pain threshold (PThr) and tolerance (PTol) were calculated to represent hyperalgesia, and were assessed both within and across sessions. RESULTS: Mean decreases in cold PTol were seen in the alfentanil group at 180 minutes (−3.8 seconds, +/−26.5) and 480 minutes (−1.63 seconds, +/−31.5) after drug administration. There was a trend for differences between conditions on cold PThr hyperalgesia but not for pressure PThr. Alfentanil participants had greater mean ratings on LIKING and HIGH visual analog scales at peak effects (30 minutes), but these scores did not change across sessions. DISCUSSION: Repeated alfentanil exposures over 4–5 weeks resulted in within session decreases in cold pain tolerance from baseline but these differences were not substantially different from diphenhydramine controls. The results did not support the phenomenon of OIH in this model, although definitive conclusions regarding the existence of OIH in humans likely requires a larger sample size or an alternative model
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