213 research outputs found

    Quantum Associative Memory in HEP Track Pattern Recognition

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    We have entered the Noisy Intermediate-Scale Quantum Era. A plethora of quantum processor prototypes allow evaluation of potential of the Quantum Computing paradigm in applications to pressing computational problems of the future. Growing data input rates and detector resolution foreseen in High-Energy LHC (2030s) experiments expose the often high time and/or space complexity of classical algorithms. Quantum algorithms can potentially become the lower-complexity alternatives in such cases. In this work we discuss the potential of Quantum Associative Memory (QuAM) in the context of LHC data triggering. We examine the practical limits of storage capacity, as well as store and recall errorless efficiency, from the viewpoints of the state-of-the-art IBM quantum processors and LHC real-time charged track pattern recognition requirements. We present a software prototype implementation of the QuAM protocols and analyze the topological limitations for porting the simplest QuAM instances to the public IBM 5Q and 14Q cloud-based superconducting chips.Comment: 8 pages, 6 figures, 1 table. Talk presented at CHEP2018. (v2) minor stylistic revisions and typos correcte

    Multi-threaded Geant4 on the Xeon-Phi with Complex High-Energy Physics Geometry

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    To study the performance of multi-threaded Geant4 for high-energy physics experiments, an application has been developed which generalizes and extends previous work. A highly-complex detector geometry is used for benchmarking on an Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor. In addition, an implementation of parallel I/O based on Intel SCIF and ROOT technologies is incorporated and studied

    Novel deep learning methods for track reconstruction

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    For the past year, the HEP.TrkX project has been investigating machine learning solutions to LHC particle track reconstruction problems. A variety of models were studied that drew inspiration from computer vision applications and operated on an image-like representation of tracking detector data. While these approaches have shown some promise, image-based methods face challenges in scaling up to realistic HL-LHC data due to high dimensionality and sparsity. In contrast, models that can operate on the spacepoint representation of track measurements ("hits") can exploit the structure of the data to solve tasks efficiently. In this paper we will show two sets of new deep learning models for reconstructing tracks using space-point data arranged as sequences or connected graphs. In the first set of models, Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) are used to extrapolate, build, and evaluate track candidates akin to Kalman Filter algorithms. Such models can express their own uncertainty when trained with an appropriate likelihood loss function. The second set of models use Graph Neural Networks (GNNs) for the tasks of hit classification and segment classification. These models read a graph of connected hits and compute features on the nodes and edges. They adaptively learn which hit connections are important and which are spurious. The models are scaleable with simple architecture and relatively few parameters. Results for all models will be presented on ACTS generic detector simulated data.Comment: CTD 2018 proceeding

    Graph Neural Networks for Particle Reconstruction in High Energy Physics detectors

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    Pattern recognition problems in high energy physics are notably different from traditional machine learning applications in computer vision. Reconstruction algorithms identify and measure the kinematic properties of particles produced in high energy collisions and recorded with complex detector systems. Two critical applications are the reconstruction of charged particle trajectories in tracking detectors and the reconstruction of particle showers in calorimeters. These two problems have unique challenges and characteristics, but both have high dimensionality, high degree of sparsity, and complex geometric layouts. Graph Neural Networks (GNNs) are a relatively new class of deep learning architectures which can deal with such data effectively, allowing scientists to incorporate domain knowledge in a graph structure and learn powerful representations leveraging that structure to identify patterns of interest. In this work we demonstrate the applicability of GNNs to these two diverse particle reconstruction problems.Comment: Presented at NeurIPS 2019 Workshop "Machine Learning and the Physical Sciences

    Graph Neural Networks for Particle Reconstruction in High Energy Physics detectors

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    Pattern recognition problems in high energy physics are notably different from traditional machine learning applications in computer vision. Reconstruction algorithms identify and measure the kinematic properties of particles produced in high energy collisions and recorded with complex detector systems. Two critical applications are the reconstruction of charged particle trajectories in tracking detectors and the reconstruction of particle showers in calorimeters. These two problems have unique challenges and characteristics, but both have high dimensionality, high degree of sparsity, and complex geometric layouts. Graph Neural Networks (GNNs) are a relatively new class of deep learning architectures which can deal with such data effectively, allowing scientists to incorporate domain knowledge in a graph structure and learn powerful representations leveraging that structure to identify patterns of interest. In this work we demonstrate the applicability of GNNs to these two diverse particle reconstruction problems

    High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

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    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.Comment: 72 page

    The HEP.TrkX Project: deep neural networks for HL-LHC online and offline tracking

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    Particle track reconstruction in dense environments such as the detectors of the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) is a challenging pattern recognition problem. Traditional tracking algorithms such as the combinatorial Kalman Filter have been used with great success in LHC experiments for years. However, these state-of-the-art techniques are inherently sequential and scale poorly with the expected increases in detector occupancy in the HL-LHC conditions. The HEP.TrkX project is a pilot project with the aim to identify and develop cross-experiment solutions based on machine learning algorithms for track reconstruction. Machine learning algorithms bring a lot of potential to this problem thanks to their capability to model complex non-linear data dependencies, to learn effective representations of high-dimensional data through training, and to parallelize easily on high-throughput architectures such as GPUs. This contribution will describe our initial explorations into this relatively unexplored idea space. We will discuss the use of recurrent (LSTM) and convolutional neural networks to find and fit tracks in toy detector data

    Graph Neural Network for Object Reconstruction in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers

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    This paper presents a graph neural network (GNN) technique for low-level reconstruction of neutrino interactions in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC). GNNs are still a relatively novel technique, and have shown great promise for similar reconstruction tasks in the LHC. In this paper, a multihead attention message passing network is used to classify the relationship between detector hits by labelling graph edges, determining whether hits were produced by the same underlying particle, and if so, the particle type. The trained model is 84% accurate overall, and performs best on the EM shower and muon track classes. The model's strengths and weaknesses are discussed, and plans for developing this technique further are summarised.Comment: 7 pages, 3 figures, submitted to the 25th International Conference on Computing in High-Energy and Nuclear Physic
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