158 research outputs found

    Overall influenza-associated mortality rates (MR) and mortality rate ratios (MRR) (crude rates unless otherwise specified) for Indigenous peoples compared with a benchmark population.

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    Overall influenza-associated mortality rates (MR) and mortality rate ratios (MRR) (crude rates unless otherwise specified) for Indigenous peoples compared with a benchmark population.</p

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    Table A: Search StrategyTable B: List of excluded studies (from full text review)Table C: Features of included studiesTable D: Notes about hospitalisation- and mortality-rate calculationsTable E: Quality assessment of included studiesTable F: JBI risk of bias assessment鈥揷omments.References. Table A: Search Strategy Table B: List of excluded studies (from full text review) Table C: Features of included studies Table D: Notes about hospitalisation- and mortality-rate calculations Table E: Quality assessment of included studies Table F: JBI risk of bias assessment鈥揷omments. References. (DOC)</p

    Overall influenza-associated hospitalisation rates (HR) and hospitalisation rate ratios (HRR) (crude rates unless otherwise specified) for Indigenous peoples compared with a benchmark population.

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    Overall influenza-associated hospitalisation rates (HR) and hospitalisation rate ratios (HRR) (crude rates unless otherwise specified) for Indigenous peoples compared with a benchmark population.</p

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza-associated hospitalisation rate ratios (HRR) from Australian studies for Indigenous populations compared with a benchmark population.

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    Seasonal and pandemic influenza-associated hospitalisation rate ratios (HRR) from Australian studies for Indigenous populations compared with a benchmark population.</p

    Influenza-associated hospitalisation and mortality rates among global Indigenous populations; a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    BackgroundMore than 50 million influenza infections and over 100,000 deaths from influenza occur annually. While Indigenous populations experience an inequitable influenza burden, the magnitude of this inequity has not previously been estimated on a global scale. This study compared rates of influenza-associated hospitalisation and mortality between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations globally.MethodsA systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted including literature published prior to 13 July 2021. Eligible articles either reported a rate ratio (RR) comparing laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalisation and/or mortality between an Indigenous population and a corresponding benchmark population, or reported sufficient information for this to be calculated using publicly available data. Findings were reported by country/region and pooled by country and period (pandemic/seasonal) when multiple studies were available using a random-effects model. The I2 statistic assessed variability between studies.ResultsThirty-six studies (moderate/high quality) were included; all from high or high-middle income countries. The pooled influenza-associated hospitalisation RR (HRR) for indigenous compared to benchmark populations was 5路7 (95% CI: 2路7-12路0) for Canada, 5路2 (2.9-9.3) for New Zealand, and 5.2 (4.2-6.4) for Australia. Of the Australian studies, the pooled HRR for seasonal influenza was 3.1 (2路7-3路5) and for pandemic influenza was 6路2 (5路1-7路5). Heterogeneity was slightly higher among studies of pandemic influenza than seasonal influenza. The pooled mortality RR was 4.1 (3路0-5.7) in Australia and 3路3 (2.7-4.1) in the United States.ConclusionsEthnic inequities in severe influenza persist and must be addressed by reducing disparities in the underlying determinants of health. Influenza surveillance systems worldwide should include Indigenous status to determine the extent of the disease burden among Indigenous populations. Ethnic inequities in pandemic influenza illustrate the need to prioritise Indigenous populations in pandemic response plans

    Influenza-associated hospitalisation and mortality rates among global Indigenous populations; a systematic review and meta-analysis

    No full text
    Background More than 50 million influenza infections and over 100,000 deaths from influenza occur annually. While Indigenous populations experience an inequitable influenza burden, the magnitude of this inequity has not previously been estimated on a global scale. This study compared rates of influenza-associated hospitalisation and mortality between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations globally. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted including literature published prior to 13 July 2021. Eligible articles either reported a rate ratio (RR) comparing laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalisation and/or mortality between an Indigenous population and a corresponding benchmark population, or reported sufficient information for this to be calculated using publicly available data. Findings were reported by country/region and pooled by country and period (pandemic/seasonal) when multiple studies were available using a random-effects model. The I2 statistic assessed variability between studies. Results Thirty-six studies (moderate/high quality) were included; all from high or high-middle income countries. The pooled influenza-associated hospitalisation RR (HRR) for indigenous compared to benchmark populations was 5路7 (95% CI: 2路7鈥12路0) for Canada, 5路2 (2.9鈥9.3) for New Zealand, and 5.2 (4.2鈥6.4) for Australia. Of the Australian studies, the pooled HRR for seasonal influenza was 3.1 (2路7鈥3路5) and for pandemic influenza was 6路2 (5路1鈥7路5). Heterogeneity was slightly higher among studies of pandemic influenza than seasonal influenza. The pooled mortality RR was 4.1 (3路0鈥5.7) in Australia and 3路3 (2.7鈥4.1) in the United States. Conclusions Ethnic inequities in severe influenza persist and must be addressed by reducing disparities in the underlying determinants of health. Influenza surveillance systems worldwide should include Indigenous status to determine the extent of the disease burden among Indigenous populations. Ethnic inequities in pandemic influenza illustrate the need to prioritise Indigenous populations in pandemic response plans

    PRISMA 2020 checklist.

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    BackgroundMore than 50 million influenza infections and over 100,000 deaths from influenza occur annually. While Indigenous populations experience an inequitable influenza burden, the magnitude of this inequity has not previously been estimated on a global scale. This study compared rates of influenza-associated hospitalisation and mortality between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations globally.MethodsA systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted including literature published prior to 13 July 2021. Eligible articles either reported a rate ratio (RR) comparing laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalisation and/or mortality between an Indigenous population and a corresponding benchmark population, or reported sufficient information for this to be calculated using publicly available data. Findings were reported by country/region and pooled by country and period (pandemic/seasonal) when multiple studies were available using a random-effects model. The I2 statistic assessed variability between studies.ResultsThirty-six studies (moderate/high quality) were included; all from high or high-middle income countries. The pooled influenza-associated hospitalisation RR (HRR) for indigenous compared to benchmark populations was 5路7 (95% CI: 2路7鈥12路0) for Canada, 5路2 (2.9鈥9.3) for New Zealand, and 5.2 (4.2鈥6.4) for Australia. Of the Australian studies, the pooled HRR for seasonal influenza was 3.1 (2路7鈥3路5) and for pandemic influenza was 6路2 (5路1鈥7路5). Heterogeneity was slightly higher among studies of pandemic influenza than seasonal influenza. The pooled mortality RR was 4.1 (3路0鈥5.7) in Australia and 3路3 (2.7鈥4.1) in the United States.ConclusionsEthnic inequities in severe influenza persist and must be addressed by reducing disparities in the underlying determinants of health. Influenza surveillance systems worldwide should include Indigenous status to determine the extent of the disease burden among Indigenous populations. Ethnic inequities in pandemic influenza illustrate the need to prioritise Indigenous populations in pandemic response plans.</div

    Flow diagram of included studies.

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    BackgroundMore than 50 million influenza infections and over 100,000 deaths from influenza occur annually. While Indigenous populations experience an inequitable influenza burden, the magnitude of this inequity has not previously been estimated on a global scale. This study compared rates of influenza-associated hospitalisation and mortality between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations globally.MethodsA systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted including literature published prior to 13 July 2021. Eligible articles either reported a rate ratio (RR) comparing laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalisation and/or mortality between an Indigenous population and a corresponding benchmark population, or reported sufficient information for this to be calculated using publicly available data. Findings were reported by country/region and pooled by country and period (pandemic/seasonal) when multiple studies were available using a random-effects model. The I2 statistic assessed variability between studies.ResultsThirty-six studies (moderate/high quality) were included; all from high or high-middle income countries. The pooled influenza-associated hospitalisation RR (HRR) for indigenous compared to benchmark populations was 5路7 (95% CI: 2路7鈥12路0) for Canada, 5路2 (2.9鈥9.3) for New Zealand, and 5.2 (4.2鈥6.4) for Australia. Of the Australian studies, the pooled HRR for seasonal influenza was 3.1 (2路7鈥3路5) and for pandemic influenza was 6路2 (5路1鈥7路5). Heterogeneity was slightly higher among studies of pandemic influenza than seasonal influenza. The pooled mortality RR was 4.1 (3路0鈥5.7) in Australia and 3路3 (2.7鈥4.1) in the United States.ConclusionsEthnic inequities in severe influenza persist and must be addressed by reducing disparities in the underlying determinants of health. Influenza surveillance systems worldwide should include Indigenous status to determine the extent of the disease burden among Indigenous populations. Ethnic inequities in pandemic influenza illustrate the need to prioritise Indigenous populations in pandemic response plans.</div
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