333 research outputs found

    Cochlea-inspired tonotopic resonators

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    The cochlea has long been the subject of investigation in various research fields due to its intriguing spiral architecture and unique sensing characteristics. One of its most interesting features is tonotopy, the abil- ity to sense acoustic waves at different spatial locations based on their frequency content. In this work, we propose a novel design for a tonotopic resonator, based on a cochlea-inspired spiral, which can dis- criminate the frequency content of elastic waves without the use of sub-wavelength resonators. The structure is the result of an optimization process to obtain a uniform distribution of displacement max- ima along its centreline for frequencies spanning nearly two-decades, while maintaining a compact design. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the concept and experimental measure- ments to validate it on a 3D printed structure. The resulting frequency-dependent distribution is also shown to be a viable means to discriminate signals with various frequency components. We also show that for appropriate parameter ranges, the tonotopic behaviour can be inverted, i.e., lower frequencies can be made to concentrate in narrower regions, as happens in the real cochlea. The harnessed tonotopic features can be used as a fundamental principle to design structures with applications in areas such as non-destructive testing and vibration attenuation

    Tunable topological edge modes in Su–Schrieffer–Heeger arrays

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    A potential weakness of topological waveguides is that they act on a fixed narrow band of frequencies. However, by 3D printing samples from a photo-responsive polymer, we can obtain a device whose operating frequency can be fine-tuned dynamically using laser excitation. This greatly enhances existing static tunability strategies, typically based on modifying the geometry. We use a version of the classical Su–Schrieffer–Heeger model to demonstrate our approach

    Cochlea-inspired tonotopic resonators

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    The cochlea has long been the subject of investigation in various research fields due to its intriguing spiral architecture and unique sensing characteristics. One of its most interesting features is tonotopy, the ability to sense acoustic waves at different spatial locations based on their frequency content. In this work, we propose a novel design for a tonotopic resonator, based on a cochlea-inspired spiral, which can discriminate the frequency content of elastic waves without the use of sub-wavelength resonators. The structure is the result of an optimization process to display a uniform distribution of displacement maxima along its centreline for frequencies spanning nearly a two-decade range, while maintaining a compact design. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the concept and experimental measurements to validate it on a 3D printed structure. The resulting frequency-dependent distribution is also shown to be a viable means to discriminate signals with various frequency components. We also show that for appropriate parameter ranges, the tonotopic behaviour can be inverted, i.e., lower frequencies can be made to concentrate in narrower regions, as happens in the real cochlea. The harnessed tonotopic features can be used as a fundamental principle to design structures with applications in areas such as non-destructive testing and vibration attenuation

    Emerging topics in nanophononics and elastic, acoustic, and mechanical metamaterials: An overview

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    This broad review summarizes recent advances and "hot"research topics in nanophononics and elastic, acoustic, and mechanical metamaterials based on results presented by the authors at the EUROMECH 610 Colloquium held on April 25-27, 2022 in Benicássim, Spain. The key goal of the colloquium was to highlight important developments in these areas, particularly new results that emerged during the last two years. This work thus presents a "snapshot"of the state-of-the-art of different nanophononics- and metamaterial-related topics rather than a historical view on these subjects, in contrast to a conventional review article. The introduction of basic definitions for each topic is followed by an outline of design strategies for the media under consideration, recently developed analysis and implementation techniques, and discussions of current challenges and promising applications. This review, while not comprehensive, will be helpful especially for early-career researchers, among others, as it offers a broad view of the current state-of-the-art and highlights some unique and flourishing research in the mentioned fields, providing insight into multiple exciting research directions

    Bio-inspired non self-similar hierarchical elastic metamaterials

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    Hierarchy provides unique opportunities for the design of advanced materials with superior properties that arise from architecture, rather than from constitutive material response. Contrary to the quasi-static regime, where the potential of hierarchy has been largely explored, its role in vibration mitigation and wave manipulation remains elusive. So far, the majority of the studies concerning hierarchical elastic metamaterials have proposed a selfsimilar repetition of a specific unit cell at multiple scale levels, leading to the activation of the same bandgap mechanism at different frequencies. On the contrary, here, we show that by designing non self-similar hierarchical geometries allows us to create periodic structures supporting multiple, highly attenuative and broadband bandgaps involving (independently or simultaneously) different scattering mechanisms, namely, Bragg scattering, local resonance and/or inertial amplification, at different frequencies. The type of band gap mechanism is identified and discussed by examining the vibrational mode shapes and the imaginary component of the wavenumber in the dispersion diagram of the unit cell. We also experimentally confirm this by performing measurements in the lowest frequency regime on a 3D printed structure. Hierarchical design strategies may find application in vibration mitigation for civil, aerospace and mechanical engineering

    Multiscale static and dynamic mechanical study of the Turritella terebra and Turritellinella tricarinata seashells

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    Marine shells are designed by nature to ensure mechanical protection from predators and shelter for molluscs living inside them. A large amount of work has been done to study the multiscale mechanical properties of their complex microstructure and to draw inspiration for the design of impact-resistant biomimetic materials. Less is known regarding the dynamic behaviour related to their structure at multiple scales. Here, we present a combined experimental and numerical study of the shells of two different species of gastropod sea snail belonging to the Turritellidae family, featuring a peculiar helicoconic shape with hierarchical spiral elements. The proposed procedure involves the use of micro-computed tomography scans for the accurate determination of geometry, atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation to evaluate local mechanical properties, surface morphology and heterogeneity, as well as resonant ultrasound spectroscopy coupled with finite element analysis simulations to determine global modal behaviour. Results indicate that the specific features of the considered shells, in particular their helicoconic and hierarchical structure, can also be linked to their vibration attenuation behaviour. Moreover, the proposed investigation method can be extended to the study of other natural systems, to determine their structure-related dynamic properties, ultimately aiding the design of bioinspired metamaterials and of structures with advanced vibration control

    Elastic wave dispersion in layered media with suture joints: influence of structural hierarchy and viscoelasticity

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    Suture joints contribute to the exceptional combination of stiffness, strength, toughness and efficient load bearing and transmission of many biological structures like the cranium or ammonite fossil shells. However, their role in the attenuation of vibrations and effect on dynamic loads is less clear. Moreover, the self-similar hierarchical geometry often associated with suture joints renders its treatment with standard numerical approaches computationally prohibitive. To address this problem, this paper investigates the dynamic response of periodic layered media with suture joints using an analytical approach based on material homogenization. A general trapezoidal suture geometry is considered together with the fundamental ingredients of hierarchy and viscoelasticity. The Spectral Element Method and Bloch theorem are used to derive the dispersion relation and band diagram of the system, including propagating and evanescent dispersion modes. A strong influence of the suture morphology and material properties emerges, and the analysis reveals an important advantage of adding hierarchy, i.e. the possibility of simultaneously obtaining wider bandgaps and their shift to higher frequencies. A synergy between hierarchy and structure is also observed, providing superior levels of wave attenuation. These findings suggest a possible design concept for bioinspired devices with efficient and tailorable wave attenuation properties

    MIRELLA: a mathematical model explains the effect of microRNA-mediated synthetic genes regulation on intracellular resource allocation

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    Competition for intracellular resources, also known as gene expression burden, induces coupling between independently co-expressed genes, a detrimental effect on predictability and reliability of gene circuits in mammalian cells. We recently showed that microRNA (miRNA)-mediated target downregulation correlates with the upregulation of a co-expressed gene, and by exploiting miRNAs-based incoherent-feed-forward loops (iFFLs) we stabilise a gene of interest against burden. Considering these findings, we speculate that miRNA-mediated gene downregulation causes cellular resource redistribution. Despite the extensive use of miRNA in synthetic circuits regulation, this indirect effect was never reported before. Here we developed a synthetic genetic system that embeds miRNA regulation, and a mathematical model, MIRELLA, to unravel the miRNA (MI) RolE on intracellular resource aLLocAtion. We report that the link between miRNA-gene downregulation and independent genes upregulation is a result of the concerted action of ribosome redistribution and ‘queueing-effect’ on the RNA degradation pathway. Taken together, our results provide for the first time insights into the hidden regulatory interaction of miRNA-based synthetic networks, potentially relevant also in endogenous gene regulation. Our observations allow to define rules for complexity- and context-aware design of genetic circuits, in which transgenes co-expression can be modulated by tuning resource availability via number and location of miRNA target sites

    Process design for the manufacturing of soft X-ray gratings in single-crystal diamond by high-energy heavy-ion irradiation

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    Artículo con 9 figurasThis paper describes in detail a novel manufacturing process for optical gratings suitable for use in the UV and soft X-ray regimes in a single-crystal diamond substrate based on highly focused swift heavy-ion irradiation. This type of grating is extensively used in light source facilities such as synchrotrons or free electron lasers, with ever-increasing demands in terms of thermal loads, depending on beamline operational parameters and architecture. The process proposed in this paper may be a future alternative to current manufacturing techniques, providing the advantage of being applicable to single-crystal diamond substrates, with their unique properties in terms of heat conductivity and radiation hardness. The paper summarizes the physical principle used for the grating patterns produced by swift heavy-ion irradiation and provides full details for the manufacturing process for a specific grating configuration, inspired in one of the beamlines at the ALBA synchrotron light source, while stressing the most challenging points for a potential implementation. Preliminary proof-of-concept experimental results are presented, showing the practical implementation of the methodology proposed herein.The authors acknowledge funding support by the following projects: PID2020-112770RB-C22 from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, TechnoFusión (III)-CM (S2018/EMT-4437) from Comunidad de Madrid (cofinanced by ERDF and ESF), agreement between Community of Madrid and Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (item “Excellence of University Professorate”). M.L.C. acknowledges financial support from the research project “Captacion de Talento UAM” Ref: #541D300 supervised by the Vice-Chancellor of Research of Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM). LOREA beamline at ALBA is a project co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) within the Framework of the Smart Growth Operative Programme 2014-2020. The authors acknowledge the support from The Centro de Microanálisis de Materiales (CMAM)—Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, for the beam time proposal (demonstration of a grating profile for soft X-rays in diamond via ion lithography) with code IuB-005/21, and its technical staff for their contribution to the operation of the accelerator. We also acknowledge P. Olivero for very useful comments on the manuscript draf

    A 3D Griffith peeling model to unify and generalize single and double peeling theories

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