93 research outputs found

    NONPOINT SOURCE AND CARBON SEQUESTRATION CREDIT TRADING: WHAT CAN THE TWO LEARN FROM EACH OTHER?

    Get PDF
    Emission trading programs have been discussed with respect to achieving water quality objectives and future caps on carbon emissions. A significant part of this literature explores the institutional and technical design issues associated with trades involving nonpoint effluent sources and carbon sequestration. This paper explores conceptual linkages between the nonpoint and carbon sequestration programs and identifies potential areas where cross fertilization can benefit research and policy design of trading programs for environmental protection.Environmental Economics and Policy, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    THE FARM LEVEL EFFECTS OF BETTER ACCESS TO INFORMATION: THE CASE OF DART

    Get PDF
    In this study, two methods of entering and accessing dairy herd records are compared: the traditional mail-in Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) system and the Direct Access to Records by Telephone (DART) system, which provides more timely and convenient access to records. An evaluation of DART was carried out using mail survey responses from 117 DART users and telephone surveys of 40 randomly selected users. Results indicate that DART users are generally satisfied with the system and feel that it improves their herd management. Variations in use of the DART system by DART users are explained by herd, cost, and management variables. DART users and comparable non-DART, DHI users are compared with respect to gains in herd production efficiency. Results indicate that DART users made somewhat better gains in most efficiency measures but that the differences were generally not statistically significant.Farm Management,

    On Consumers' Attitudes and Willingness to Pay for Improved Drinking Water Quality and Infrastructure

    Get PDF
    Replaced with revised version of paper 07/23/09.willingness to pay, risk perceptions, water infrastructure, simultaneous equation model, Environmental Economics and Policy,

    Effects of Private Insurance on Forest Landowners' Incentives to Sequester and Trade Carbon under Uncertainty: Impact of Hurricanes

    Get PDF
    We evaluate incentives of forest landowners for sequestering and trading carbon, given the risk of carbon loss from hurricanes, and an opportunity to insure their losses. Results of simulation model reveal that the effect of hurricane risk depends on the variability of returns from carbon and timber and landowners' ability to mitigate risk by diversifying forest holdings across regions or transferring risk by purchasing insurance.Carbon Sequestration, Emissions Trading, Natural Disaster, Risk, Insurance, Risk and Uncertainty, Q54, Q58,

    Reducing Crop Nutrient Applications: The Yield Reserve Program

    Get PDF
    A proposed Yield Reserve Program designed to compensate farmers for any reduced yields resulting from reduced nitrogen (N) application rates below recommended rates is evaluated. Assuming that farmers currently follow extension recommendations for applying N, Yield Reserve Program participation reduces expected net revenue by 10to10 to 13/ha. The Yield Reserve Program reduces expected net revenue by 17to17 to 20/ha for farmers who apply N to maximize expected net revenue. Farmers costs of participation increase with lower probabilities of inadequate rainfall and higher corn prices and decline with higher N prices. The Yield Reserve Program can significantly reduce N applications to cropland, which may reduce N content of surface waters, but the costs to taxpayers and farmers will depend on how the program is implemented.compliance cost, nitrogen fertilizer, nonpoint source pollution, policy, yield response function, Crop Production/Industries,

    ECONOMIC RETURNS FROM REDUCING POULTRY LITTER PHOSPHORUS WITH MICROBIAL PHYTASE

    Get PDF
    Requiring that crop applications of manure be based on phosphorus content (P-standard) could increase poultry litter disposal costs. Microbial phytase reduces litter P content and could reduce litter disposal costs under a P-standard. For a representative Virginia turkey farm, phytase costs 2,500andcouldincreasevalueoflitterusedforfertilizerontheturkeyfarmby2,500 and could increase value of litter used for fertilizer on the turkey farm by 390 and reduce supplemental P feed costs by 1,431.Basedonassumedlitterdemandandsupply,estimatedlitterexportpriceswithphytasecouldexceedexportpriceswithoutphytaseby1,431. Based on assumed litter demand and supply, estimated litter export prices with phytase could exceed export prices without phytase by 3.81 per ton. Phytase net returns to the farm are an estimated $ 1,435.Economic returns, Microbial phytase, Nutrient management, Phosphorus, Poultry litter, Water quality, Livestock Production/Industries,

    Spatial Econometrics Revisited: A Case Study of Land Values in Roanoke County

    Get PDF
    Omitting spatial characteristics such as proximity to amenities from hedonic land value models may lead to spatial autocorrelation and biased and inefficient estimators. A spatial autoregressive error model can be used to model the spatial structure of errors arising from omitted spatial effects. This paper demonstrates an alternative approach to modeling land values based on individual and joint misspecification tests using data from Roanoke County in Virginia. Spatial autocorrelation is found in land value models of Roanoke County. Defining neighborhoods based on geographic and socioeconomics characteristics produces better estimates of neighborhood effects on land values than simple distance measures. Implementing a comprehensive set of individual and joint misspecification tests results in better correction for misspecification errors compared to existing practices.Land Economics/Use,

    Residential Land Values in Urbanizing Areas

    Get PDF
    Zoning decisions related to residential lot size and density affect residential land value. Effects of size on residential parcel value in Roanoke County, VA, are estimated with fixed effects hedonic models. Parcel size; elevation; soil permeability; proximity to urban areas, malls, and roads; and location influence parcel value, but the effects vary by value of construction and development status. Parcel value per square meter declines with increasing parcel size. The estimated relationships could be used to evaluate zoning decisions in terms of land values and tax revenues if model estimation uncertainties and responses by developers to zoning strategies are considered.development, fixed effects, hedonic model, property values, residential density, spatial econometrics, Agribusiness, Land Economics/Use, Q24, C25, C52,

    COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT AND BUFFERS: COMPARISONS OF FOUR SPATIAL SCENARIOS

    Get PDF
    Policymakers are seeking cost effective methods to reduce nutrient pollution from agriculture. Predicted costs and pollution reductions from nutrient management and buffers are evaluated under four spatial scenarios describing a watershed. Results will help policymakers evaluate alternative Best Management Practices (BMPs) for water quality protection in agriculture.Environmental Economics and Policy,

    PHOSPHORUS-BASED NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT PLANNING ON DAIRY/POULTRY FARMS: IMPLICATIONS FOR ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISKS

    Get PDF
    The effects of phosphorus (P)-based nutrient management plans on economic and environmental risks of dairy and dairy-poultry farms in Virginia were evaluated. Phosphorus-based nutrient management plans can greatly reduce P runoff risk but also reduce farmers' returns. P-based plans cause greater reductions in returns and P runoff on the dairy-poultry farm than on the dairy only farm.nutrient runoff, cost, mathematical programming, simulation, watershed, Environmental Economics and Policy, Livestock Production/Industries,
    corecore