21 research outputs found

    DataSheet_1_Case Report: Metagenomic next-generation sequencing applied in diagnosing psittacosis caused by Chlamydia psittaci infection.docx

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    BackgroundChlamydia psittaci is the causative agent of psittacosis in humans, while its rapid identification is hampered due to the lack of specificity of laboratory testing methods.Case presentationThis study reports four cases of C. psittaci infection after contact with a domestic parrot, all belonging to the same family. Common manifestations like fever, cough, headache, nausea, and hypodynamia appeared in the patients. Metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) aided the etiological diagnosis of psittacosis, revealing 58318 and 7 sequence reads corresponding to C. psittaci in two cases. The detected C. psittaci was typed as ST100001 in the Multilocus-sequence typing (MLST) system, a novel strain initially reported. Based on the results of pathogenic identification by mNGS, the four patients were individually, treated with different antibiotics, and discharged with favorable outcomes.ConclusionIn diagnosing psittacosis caused by a rare C. psittaci agent, mNGS provides rapid etiological identification, contributing to targeted antibiotic therapy and favorable outcomes. This study also reminds clinicians to raise awareness of psittacosis when encountering family members with a fever of unknown origin.</p

    Image_1_Case Report: Metagenomic next-generation sequencing applied in diagnosing psittacosis caused by Chlamydia psittaci infection.tif

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    BackgroundChlamydia psittaci is the causative agent of psittacosis in humans, while its rapid identification is hampered due to the lack of specificity of laboratory testing methods.Case presentationThis study reports four cases of C. psittaci infection after contact with a domestic parrot, all belonging to the same family. Common manifestations like fever, cough, headache, nausea, and hypodynamia appeared in the patients. Metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) aided the etiological diagnosis of psittacosis, revealing 58318 and 7 sequence reads corresponding to C. psittaci in two cases. The detected C. psittaci was typed as ST100001 in the Multilocus-sequence typing (MLST) system, a novel strain initially reported. Based on the results of pathogenic identification by mNGS, the four patients were individually, treated with different antibiotics, and discharged with favorable outcomes.ConclusionIn diagnosing psittacosis caused by a rare C. psittaci agent, mNGS provides rapid etiological identification, contributing to targeted antibiotic therapy and favorable outcomes. This study also reminds clinicians to raise awareness of psittacosis when encountering family members with a fever of unknown origin.</p

    Brain areas with significant ALFF differences between the breastmilk-fed group and the formula-fed group.

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    Brain areas with significant ALFF differences between the breastmilk-fed group and the formula-fed group.</p

    Brain areas of significant VBM difference between the breastmilk-fed group and formula-fed group.

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    Brain areas of significant VBM difference between the breastmilk-fed group and formula-fed group.</p

    Comparison of regional gray matter volume measures by VBM.

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    The results are shown in a 3D view in A and a 2D view in B. The threshold was set at p formula-fed). All images are displayed according to the radiologic convention (left/right flipped).</p

    Comparison of regional brain activation measures by ALFF.

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    The results are shown in a 3D view in A and a 2D view in B. Average activation maps for the fMRI under analgesia for breastmilk-fed and formula-fed infants. The threshold was set at p formula-fed).</p

    Dominant serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance profile of <i>Shigella</i> spp. in Xinjiang, China

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    <div><p><i>Shigella</i> represents one of the major diarrhea-inducing pathogens threatening public health, but its prevalence and antimicrobial resistance profile in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous region, China, remains unclear. We conducted comprehensive investigation of <i>Shigella</i> serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance pattern in Xinjiang, identifying 458 <i>Shigella</i> isolates between 2008 to 2014. <i>Shigella flexneri</i> was identified as predominant species, and several <i>S</i>. <i>flexneri</i> serotypes were isolated, including atypical serotypes 1c, 2c, and 4s. Dominant <i>S</i>. <i>flexneri</i> serotypes were 2a, 1b, 2b, and Xv, different from those generally dominant in China. A hybrid serotype pattern was observed, which included the major Chinese serotypes (2a, Xv) and those predominant in Pakistan (1b, 2b). <i>Shigella sonnei</i> was shown to have a lower frequency compared with that generally observed in China, but an increasing trend of infections associated with this pathogen was observed. Furthermore, a high frequency of drug resistance and different <i>Shigella</i> antimicrobial resistance patterns were demonstrated as well, including very severe resistance phenotypes, such as multidrug resistance and resistance to frontline antibiotics. Seventy-five cephalosporin-resistant <i>Shigella</i> isolates were frequently identified with the resistance determinants that can undergo horizontal transfer, such as <i>bla</i><sub>OXA</sub>, <i>bla</i><sub>TEM</sub>, <i>bla</i><sub>CTX-M</sub>, and integrons, facilitating the development of cephalosporin resistance among <i>Shigella</i> subtypes. Additionally, genetic analyses demonstrated that all 86 quinolone-resistant <i>S</i>. <i>flexneri</i> isolates possess 3ÔÇô4 mutation sites in quinolone resistance-determining regions, primarily contributing to their resistance to quinolone. However, <i>S</i>. <i>sonnei</i> isolates were not shown to be quinolone resistant. Co-resistance to cephalosporins and quinolones was detected in 17 <i>S</i>. <i>flexneri</i> isolates, and these isolates were additionally multidrug resistant and carried ╬▓-lactamase genes and quinolone-resistance determinants. As is demonstrated in this study, dominant serotypes of <i>Shigella</i> were distributed in unique trend with dangerous drug resistance patterns. Novel strategies are urgently required to prevent the development of drug resistance among diarrhea-inducing pathogens.</p></div
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