5 research outputs found

    Detection of Motor Cerebral Activity After Median Nerve Stimulation During General Anesthesia (STIM-MOTANA): Protocol for a Prospective Interventional Study

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    International audienceBackground Accidental awareness during general anesthesia (AAGA) is defined as an unexpected awareness of the patient during general anesthesia. This phenomenon occurs in 1%-2% of high-risk practice patients and can cause physical suffering and psychological after-effects, called posttraumatic stress disorder. In fact, no monitoring techniques are satisfactory enough to effectively prevent AAGA; therefore, new alternatives are needed. Because the first reflex for a patient during an AAGA is to move, but cannot do so because of the neuromuscular blockers, we believe that it is possible to design a brain-computer interface (BCI) based on the detection of movement intention to warn the anesthetist. To do this, we propose to describe and detect the changes in terms of motor cortex oscillations during general anesthesia with propofol, while a median nerve stimulation is performed. We believe that our results could enable the design of a BCI based on median nerve stimulation, which could prevent AAGA. Objective To our knowledge, no published studies have investigated the detection of electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns in relation to peripheral nerve stimulation over the sensorimotor cortex during general anesthesia. The main objective of this study is to describe the changes in terms of event-related desynchronization and event-related synchronization modulations, in the EEG signal over the motor cortex during general anesthesia with propofol while a median nerve stimulation is performed. Methods STIM-MOTANA is an interventional and prospective study conducted with patients scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia, involving EEG measurements and median nerve stimulation at two different times: (1) when the patient is awake before surgery (2) and under general anesthesia. A total of 30 patients will receive surgery under complete intravenous anesthesia with a target-controlled infusion pump of propofol. Results The changes in event-related desynchronization and event-related synchronization during median nerve stimulation according to the various propofol concentrations for 30 patients will be analyzed. In addition, we will apply 4 different offline machine learning algorithms to detect the median nerve stimulation at the cerebral level. Recruitment began in December 2022. Data collection is expected to conclude in June 2024. Conclusions STIM-MOTANA will be the first protocol to investigate median nerve stimulation cerebral motor effect during general anesthesia for the detection of intraoperative awareness. Based on strong practical and theoretical scientific reasoning from our previous studies, our innovative median nerve stimulation–based BCI would provide a way to detect intraoperative awareness during general anesthesia. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT05272202; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05272202 International Registered Report Identifier (IRRID) PRR1-10.2196/4387

    Aspirin and clonidine in non-cardiac surgery: acute kidney injury substudy protocol of the Perioperative Ischaemic Evaluation (POISE) 2 randomised controlled trial

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    IntroductionPerioperative Ischaemic Evaluation-2 (POISE-2) is an international 2×2 factorial randomised controlled trial of low-dose aspirin versus placebo and low-dose clonidine versus placebo in patients who undergo non-cardiac surgery. Perioperative aspirin (and possibly clonidine) may reduce the risk of postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI).Methods and analysisAfter receipt of grant funding, serial postoperative serum creatinine measurements began to be recorded in consecutive patients enrolled at substudy participating centres. With respect to the study schedule, the last of over 6500 substudy patients from 82 centres in 21 countries were randomised in December 2013. The authors will use logistic regression to estimate the adjusted OR of AKI following surgery (compared with the preoperative serum creatinine value, a postoperative increase ≥26.5 μmol/L in the 2 days following surgery or an increase of ≥50% in the 7 days following surgery) comparing each intervention to placebo, and will report the adjusted relative risk reduction. Alternate definitions of AKI will also be considered, as will the outcome of AKI in subgroups defined by the presence of preoperative chronic kidney disease and preoperative chronic aspirin use. At the time of randomisation, a subpopulation agreed to a single measurement of serum creatinine between 3 and 12 months after surgery, and the authors will examine intervention effects on this outcome.Ethics and disseminationThe authors were competitively awarded a grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research for this POISE-2 AKI substudy. Ethics approval was obtained for additional kidney data collection in consecutive patients enrolled at participating centres, which first began for patients enrolled after January 2011. In patients who provided consent, the remaining longer term serum creatinine data will be collected throughout 2014. The results of this study will be reported no later than 2015.Clinical Trial Registration NumberNCT01082874

    Detection of Cerebral Electroencephalographic Patterns After Median Nerve Stimulation During Propofol-Induced General Anesthesia : a Prospective Interventional Cohort Study

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    International audienceBackground: Devices used to assess depth of anesthesia and clinical parameters may not be sufficient to prevent intraoperative accidental awareness 1. An alternative would be to detect the patient's intention to move in order to alert the medical staff 2. We believe that the data obtained after multiple median nerve stimulation (MNS) during general anesthesia will help us to prevent intraoperative awareness 2. Methods: In this prospective, interventional trial, 30 volunteers aged from 18 to 81 years with informed consent will be enrolled for scheduled surgery from 15th January 2023 to 31st December 2026. Are excluded patients who are allergic to propofol or have a history of anaphylactic reaction, pregnant women and patients with a psychiatric disease. This study is approved by the CHU Brugmann ethical committee (CE 2021/225) and is registered at EUDRACT (2021-006457-56) and ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT05272202). EEG data based on MNS is first recorded with the patient awake, then a second recording is made under general anesthesia during the surgery. MNS is obtained by electrodes placed on the wrist. EEG signal is acquired by using a TMSi 64-channel system covering the scalp. An EEG amplifier records the changes in ERD (event-related desynchronization) and ERS (event-related synchronization) patterns at various concentrations of propofol delivered by a target-controlled infusion pump. The primary endpoint is the comparison of the average maximal values of amplitude of the ERD/ERS at rest and at various concentrations of propofol. The average ERDs max and ERSs max are compared with a Student t-test (P<0.05). Results: Our intermediate results (n=4 curarized patients) shows the ERS in the mu/beta frequency band after MNS before general anesthesia (Fig. 1A). After propofol induction, the post-stimulation ERS disappears significantly (Fig. 1B; P<0.01 with FDR correction). Conclusions: The preliminary data extracted from the ERD/ERS consecutive to MNS seems to disappear with high concentration of propofol contrary to previous studies at lower levels2. Therefore, this study is not conclusive in terms of the ERD/ERS patterns used but other EEG features (i.e., brain connectivity, somatosensory evoked potential) could be investigated and will be the subject of future research

    Perioperative aspirin and clonidine and risk of acute kidney injury: a randomized clinical trial.

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    IMPORTANCE: Acute kidney injury, a common complication of surgery, is associated with poor outcomes and high health care costs. Some studies suggest aspirin or clonidine administered during the perioperative period reduces the risk of acute kidney injury; however, these effects are uncertain and each intervention has the potential for harm. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether aspirin compared with placebo, and clonidine compared with placebo, alters the risk of perioperative acute kidney injury. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A 2 × 2 factorial randomized, blinded, clinical trial of 6905 patients undergoing noncardiac surgery from 88 centers in 22 countries with consecutive patients enrolled between January 2011 and December 2013. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were assigned to take aspirin (200 mg) or placebo 2 to 4 hours before surgery and then aspirin (100 mg) or placebo daily up to 30 days after surgery, and were assigned to take oral clonidine (0.2 mg) or placebo 2 to 4 hours before surgery, and then a transdermal clonidine patch (which provided clonidine at 0.2 mg/d) or placebo patch that remained until 72 hours after surgery. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Acute kidney injury was primarily defined as an increase in serum creatinine concentration from the preoperative concentration by either an increase of 0.3 mg/dL or greater (≥26.5 μmol/L) within 48 hours of surgery or an increase of 50% or greater within 7 days of surgery. RESULTS: Aspirin (n = 3443) vs placebo (n = 3462) did not alter the risk of acute kidney injury (13.4% vs 12.3%, respectively; adjusted relative risk, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.96-1.25). Clonidine (n = 3453) vs placebo (n = 3452) did not alter the risk of acute kidney injury (13.0% vs 12.7%, respectively; adjusted relative risk, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.90-1.18). Aspirin increased the risk of major bleeding. In a post hoc analysis, major bleeding was associated with a greater risk of subsequent acute kidney injury (23.3% when bleeding was present vs 12.3% when bleeding was absent; adjusted hazard ratio, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.72-2.83). Similarly, clonidine increased the risk of clinically important hypotension. In a post hoc analysis, clinically important hypotension was associated with a greater risk of subsequent acute kidney injury (14.3% when hypotension was present vs 11.8% when hypotension was absent; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.14-1.58). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among patients undergoing major noncardiac surgery, neither aspirin nor clonidine administered perioperatively reduced the risk of acute kidney injury. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01082874
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