17 research outputs found

    Analyzing Influential Factors in Capacitive-Coupled Wireless Power Transfer

    No full text
    Wireless power transfer (WPT) is an emerging technology and trending topic in the field of research and commercial area, it provides convenience for electrical users to charge devices by means of avoiding power cables. It has proven to be applicable from low power: mobile devices, to high power: Electric Vehicles (EV), and many other applications for battery charging. During the past, most of research focused on inductive-wireless power transfer. But, recently, capacitive-wireless power transfer (C-WPT) has proven to be efficient over inductive-wireless power transfer for near-field transmission. Capacitive- Wireless power transfer uses electric field to transfer power from transmitter to receiver by means of capacitive plates. In this work, we analyzed the resonant points of a Switch-Inductor-Inductor-Diode (SLLD) circuit. The SLLD circuit has a relatively-simple topology with only one switching device, which makes it obtaining a potential of high efficiency and easy to identify the impact of each component on system performance. The SLLD circuit is applicable for both low power and high power applications. According to the resonant points, the circuit parameters were specified to obtain the controllability of MPPT. The influential factors were analyzed and verified by experimental tests.https://digitalcommons.odu.edu/engineering_batten/1004/thumbnail.jp

    A Case Study: Influence of Circuit Impedance on the Performance of Class-E2 Resonant Power Converter for Capacitive Wireless Power Transfer

    No full text
    The evolution of power electronics led to rapid development in wireless charging technology; as a result, a single active switch topology was introduced. The present market utilizes inductive wireless power transfer (IPT); because of the disadvantages of cost, size, and safety concerns, research on wireless power transfer was diverted towards capacitive wireless power transfer (CPT). This paper studies the optimal impedance tracking of the capacitive wireless power transfer system for maximum power transfer. Compared to prior methods developed for maximum power point tracking in power control, this paper proposes a new approach by means of finding impedance characteristics of the CPT system for a certain range of frequencies. Considering the drone battery as an application, a single active switch Class-E2 resonant converter with circular coupling plates is utilized. Impedance characteristics are identified with the help of equations related to the input and resonant impedance. The impedance tracking is laid out for various resonant inductors, and the difference in current peak is observed for each case. Simulations verify and provide additional information on the reactive type. Additionally, hardware tests provide the variation of input current and output voltage for a range of frequencies from 70 kHz to 300 kHz. Efficiency at the optimal impedance points for a resonant inductor with 50 ÎŒH and 100 ÎŒH are tested and analyzed. It is noted that the efficiency for a resonant inductor with 50 ÎŒH is 8% higher compared to the CPT with a 100 ÎŒH resonant inductor. Further hardware tests were performed to investigate the impact of frequency and duty cycle variation. Zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) limits have been discussed with respect to both frequency and duty cycle

    Highly-parallelized simulation of a pixelated LArTPC on a GPU

    No full text
    The rapid development of general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) is allowing the implementation of highly-parallelized Monte Carlo simulation chains for particle physics experiments. This technique is particularly suitable for the simulation of a pixelated charge readout for time projection chambers, given the large number of channels that this technology employs. Here we present the first implementation of a full microphysical simulator of a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) equipped with light readout and pixelated charge readout, developed for the DUNE Near Detector. The software is implemented with an end-to-end set of GPU-optimized algorithms. The algorithms have been written in Python and translated into CUDA kernels using Numba, a just-in-time compiler for a subset of Python and NumPy instructions. The GPU implementation achieves a speed up of four orders of magnitude compared with the equivalent CPU version. The simulation of the current induced on 10310^3 pixels takes around 1 ms on the GPU, compared with approximately 10 s on the CPU. The results of the simulation are compared against data from a pixel-readout LArTPC prototype

    Reconstruction of interactions in the ProtoDUNE-SP detector with Pandora

    No full text
    International audienceThe Pandora Software Development Kit and algorithm libraries provide pattern-recognition logic essential to the reconstruction of particle interactions in liquid argon time projection chamber detectors. Pandora is the primary event reconstruction software used at ProtoDUNE-SP, a prototype for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment far detector. ProtoDUNE-SP, located at CERN, is exposed to a charged-particle test beam. This paper gives an overview of the Pandora reconstruction algorithms and how they have been tailored for use at ProtoDUNE-SP. In complex events with numerous cosmic-ray and beam background particles, the simulated reconstruction and identification efficiency for triggered test-beam particles is above 80% for the majority of particle type and beam momentum combinations. Specifically, simulated 1 GeV/cc charged pions and protons are correctly reconstructed and identified with efficiencies of 86.1±0.6\pm0.6% and 84.1±0.6\pm0.6%, respectively. The efficiencies measured for test-beam data are shown to be within 5% of those predicted by the simulation

    Reconstruction of interactions in the ProtoDUNE-SP detector with Pandora

    No full text
    International audienceThe Pandora Software Development Kit and algorithm libraries provide pattern-recognition logic essential to the reconstruction of particle interactions in liquid argon time projection chamber detectors. Pandora is the primary event reconstruction software used at ProtoDUNE-SP, a prototype for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment far detector. ProtoDUNE-SP, located at CERN, is exposed to a charged-particle test beam. This paper gives an overview of the Pandora reconstruction algorithms and how they have been tailored for use at ProtoDUNE-SP. In complex events with numerous cosmic-ray and beam background particles, the simulated reconstruction and identification efficiency for triggered test-beam particles is above 80% for the majority of particle type and beam momentum combinations. Specifically, simulated 1 GeV/cc charged pions and protons are correctly reconstructed and identified with efficiencies of 86.1±0.6\pm0.6% and 84.1±0.6\pm0.6%, respectively. The efficiencies measured for test-beam data are shown to be within 5% of those predicted by the simulation
    corecore