80 research outputs found

    A review of manufacturing re-shoring in the context of customer-focused postponement strategies

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    For more than half a century, offshoring has been a trend among many industry sectors and all company sizes which are aiming to expand business by reducing costs and accessing foreign markets. However, in recent years, the evidence indicates that offshoring strategies may no longer continue to provide the same level of benefits for organizations’ manufacturing activities. Companies have begun to establish a better understanding of the total risk/benefit-balance and base their supplier decisions on strategic supply chain issue rather than simply relying on cost analysis. Hence, it is evident that there are tendencies to reverse the offshoring strategy and re-shoring manufacturing activities back to the home country. Despite the significance of this phenomenon to manufacturing, the supply chain literature has focused predominantly on the macro economic analysis, while the literature on the operational aspects of re-shoring is relatively sparse. The first half of this article aims to address the first research question which identifies the operational motivations behind the re-shoring phenomenon. This is done by studying the current literature available on the context of re-shoring. The second half of the article determines the feasibility of a manufacturing strategy, ‘postponement’, as a possible solution for the companies to adjust and cope with the volatile customer demands and new generation of technologies towards more responsive production and customizable products

    A framework for the development of Halal food products in Malaysia

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    The global increase in the Muslim population and the growing awareness of consuming halal food has created an increased demand for new and differentiated Halal food. It is known that the introduction of new products may give company the competitive advantage but it is also noted that failure rates of new food products are high. The generic product development process and food safety rules such the hazard analysis and control points (HACCP) and good manufacturing practice (GMP) are also applicable to halal products. In addition, the manufacturers producing halal food need to meet the halal requirements. The ultimate is to get the halal markings for the product. However, facts from halal certification bodies indicate that many have failed. There is a need to determine what is needed for the successful development of halal food products. This paper attempts to explore the new product development process and its management and how halal issues are incorporated. The intention of this concept paper is to propose a framework for developing halal food products. It may be used by companies that are developing halal products to better manage the product development process and facilitate in getting the halal markings. These provide competitive advantage for the companies

    Measuring the performance of product introduction

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    This paper begins with a discussion of the importance of the effective performance measurement of product introduction and the difficulties inherent within that task. Criteria are then established for effective product introduction performance measures which are used to identify the most appropriate of existing performance measurement mechanisms. A case study approach of industrial organizations is used to examine whether this mechanism is employed in practice, and wider conclusions are drawn on the formation of effective measures of performance for product introduction

    A systems approach for forward and reverse logistics design: maximising value from customer involvement

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    PURPOSE. There is significant potential for adding value by involving customer in the design process and delivery of logistic services. In order to add value to the overall logistic system, this paper proposes applying an integrated systems approach for the design of forward and reverse logistics services in order to build a self-organising service that can maximise efficiencies and in particular reduce reverse logistics costs. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH. Two exploratory case studies were conducted in the logistics systems of housing repair and maintenance sector in the UK. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, observations, and documented evidence. FINDINGS. The findings of the cross-case analysis suggests that systems approach expressed as the Vanguard Method (Seddon 2008) has a direct impact on enhancing forward logistics performance and reducing reverse product flows by nourishing three dimensions for learning from demand-driven analysis; capturing customer clean information, demand predictability and categorisation, and failure demand analysis. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS. Findings from exploratory case studies cannot be easily generalised. Hence, further case studies are needed to enrich the findings, and to facilitate their industrial applications. Further, the paper explores the utilisation of the Vanguard Method only in the area of housing repairs and maintenance logistics services. It would be valuable for future studies to further investigate the utilisation of the Vanguard Method in other logistics services settings. ORIGINALITY/VALUE. The paper demonstrates an important dynamics of how logistics services can incorporate customer demands into the logistics design process

    Operationalising “Double-Loop” learning in service organisations: A systems approach for creating knowledge

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    © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New YorkLearning organisation literature has widely discussed the connections between “double-loop” learning and its significance to organisational performance, but paying little attention to tools and systems that can operationalise “double-loop” learning in organisations. This paper investigates the impact of applying a systems approach for service operations design, expressed as the Vanguard Method (Seddon, Freedom from command and control: a better way to make the work work, 2003), in order to activate “double-loop” learning in service organisations. Two case studies were conducted in the banking mortgage operations and adults’ social care services in the UK, using the dimensions of the learning organisation questionnaire (DLOQ), semi-structured interviews, observations, and documents. The findings of the cross-case analysis support the link of applying the Vanguard Method with operationalising “double-loop” learning through three main factors, namely systematic-operations improvement, organisational capacity development, and outside-in mode of work; that are all embedded into the seven dimensions of the DLOQ. The value of this paper is the introduction of a service operations design tool that can activate “double-loop” learning performance in the fast changing knowledge era. It also provides an impetus for service organisations to creatively influence employees’ competencies to effectively improve internal systems

    Operationalisation of service innovation: a systems thinking approach

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    This paper initialises an effort to explore the impact of an innovative systems thinking approach for service operations design on creating innovation. A qualitative exploratory case study approach in two of the UK’s service sector departments was conducted, using face-to-face semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and extractions from both observations and documents. The results identify that operationalising service innovation is positively linked with applying the Vanguard Method for service operations design. Twelve micro-determinants for service innovation operationalisation have been identified that reside at three different levels in the service organisation, namely employees level (i.e. Micro), the functional level (i.e. Meso), and corporate level (i.e. Macro). The value of this paper is the introduction of a step-by-step guidance on how to build service operations design to operationalise service innovation, the paper also theorises service innovation with systems thinking methodology that emphasises holistic, multi-disciplinary, and integrative characteristics of the service system

    Lean manufacturing in public services: prospects for value creation

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    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the utilization of lean manufacturing systems in public service operations for poten- tial added value. A case study of lean manufacturing implementation at a UK city council was carried out using in-depth interviews with key personnel coupled with documents collection. The Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ) was administered among front-line employees. Results show that lean manufacturing systems could create signi cant added value to the business and employees. A strong relation- ship was demonstrated between the lean manufacturing implementation and the a ective commitment level of employees. This paper is one of a few studies that demonstrate the applicability of manufacturing systems in other settings and that they can generate significant added value for the service department and its employees

    Service organisations resilience through the application of the vanguard method of systems thinking: A case study approach

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    The construct of organisational resilience is embedded in a set of individual level attributes and organisational level processes; however, there seems to be scarcity in the current literature of resilient models of operation that can amalgamate these two interlinked levels. This paper is an attempt to empirically explore the relationship of applying the vanguard method of systems thinking in service organisations with enhancing organisational resilience. Two case studies were conducted in two service organisations in the UK. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews, observations, and archival documents, followed by the use of the nine-item Organisational Commitment Questionnaire. Cross-case analysis of the results shows that the employment of the vanguard method in service organisations operationalized two-dimensional determinants for improving organisational resilience; an organically structured organisation (i.e. organisational level), and highly affectively committed core employees (i.e. individual level).The value of this paper is the identification of two-level service organisations capabilities that can support organisational resilience and how these capabilities emerge as a result of employing the vanguard method. © 2013 Taylor & Francis

    Responsiveness, the primary reason behind re-shoring manufacturing activities to the UK: an Indian industry perspective

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    Purpose: Due to today’s volatile business environment companies have started to establish a better understanding of the total risk/benefit-balance concerning manufacturing location decisions of their component supply. The focus is now much more on comprehensive and strategic supply chain issues rather than simply relying on piece part cost analysis. This has led to an emerging trend called re-shoring. The aim of this paper is to understand the primary motivation behind the re-shoring strategy in the UK and investigate the factors that influence this decision from Indian industries perspectives. Design/methodology/approach: The analysis of the paper is based on interviews conducted in the UK and India (State of Tamil Nadu) in various industries including automotive, industrial goods, textile, and marine. For this purpose an interview framework based on key enablers identified from the literature, being IT solutions, manufacturing equipment and human factors. This provided an assessment of the capability of the companies for being responsive to western demand. Findings: The findings indicate that re-shoring to the UK is the result of inadequacy in responsiveness and long production lead-times of the Indian suppliers. The outcome of this paper indicates that the top factors behind this inadequacy in responsiveness are logistics and transportation, electricity shortage, excessive paperwork and working attitude. Originality/value: This paper aims to fill the gap in the re-shoring literature by providing a clear picture behind the reason for re-shoring in the UK and identify the drivers behind this shortcoming in the component supply from India

    Linking employee behaviour to external customer satisfaction using quality function deployment

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    This paper considers the relationship between human behavioural patterns occurring in industrial environments to the general level of external customer satisfaction, the hypothesis being that by correlating behaviour patterns to levels of customer satisfaction a route can be found to improve performance by changing behaviours. A modification of the quality function deployment (QFD) technique is used to relate attributes that external customers value to internal behavioural patterns. Situation strength is seen as the key influencing factor on individual and group behaviour, the argument being that, if the situation is strong, then changes to situational variables would have the primary impact upon the behaviour. In contrast, if the situation is weak, then recruitment and a rewards system are better influencers of behaviour. A case study based around a small engineering enterprise demonstrates how the use of QFD can guide managers on the introduction of the most appropriate initiatives to improve performanc
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