28 research outputs found

    PRACTICAL GUIDELINES FOR CHILD FRIENDLY SUPPLY CHAIN:Vol. 1 - The Garment Sector

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    The guidelines are part of Global March's programmatic effort to address human trafficking, forced labour, child labour and modern slavery in the Garments/Textiles sector supply chains,usually rooted in countries with unequal and low socio-economic indicator

    PRACTICAL GUIDELINES FOR CHILD FRIENDLY SUPPLY CHAIN Vol. 2 - The Fisheries/Seafood Sector:Vol. 2 - The Fisheries/Seafood Sector

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    The guidelines are part of Global March's programmatic effort to address human trafficking,forced labour, child labour and modern slavery in the fisheries/seafood sector supply chains,usually rooted in countries with unequal and low socio-economic indicator

    Social identity and environmental citizenship in multinational corporations: an exploratory investigation and future research directions

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    Adapting to a \u27green\u27 agenda requires active engagement of all relevant stakeholders such as societies, national, international and multinational corporations. Within organizations, leaders need to create a conducive organizational culture and identity to inculcate prosocial behaviours for becoming environmentally sensitive and responsible among employees through environmental citizenship. It can be argued that environmental citizenship among employees can enhance an organization\u27s environmental performance and impacts. Linking the notions and theories of social identity and environmental citizenship, this exploratory study examines the perceptions, attitudes and values of managers on engaging employees in green involvement. We also explore the organizational factors that were implemented across the workplace and its underpinning sustainable strategies for green engagement with an overarching research question: How can organizations promote green behaviour and identity among employees and engage them in meeting green targets for organizations? We employed a qualitative method by designing a focus group study. Our findings help us explore factors for promoting a social identity and environmental citizenship in business organizations and to understand speciļ¬c methods that motivate green behaviours among employees, so that a culture and identity of being green becomes prominent and extends to the homes and wider society of employees

    A Review of Corporate Social Responsibility in India

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    Critiques argue that Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a North-led agenda with narrow focus. Bimal Arora and Ravi Puranik apply a development-oriented framework to contextualize CSR to structural adjustments-related macro socio-economic issues relevant to the developing countries, with a focus on CSR in India. They review contemporary CSR trends in India concluding that although the corporate sector in India benefited immensely from liberalization and privatization processes, its transition from philanthropic mindsets to CSR has been lagging behind its impressive financial growth. Development (2004) 47, 93ā€“100. doi:10.1057/palgrave.development.1100057

    Human resource management and performance at the Indian Railways

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    Purpose: High-performance work practices (HPWPs) have been well documented within private organisations in developed country economies. Such practices, however, remain under-investigated in the public sector and in emerging economies. The purpose of this paper is to work towards filling this void, by empirically evaluating HPWP within an Indian public sector undertaking (PSU), also the world\u27s largest commercial public sector employer: the Indian Railways (IR). Design/methodology/approach: The authors investigate whether the practices implemented in this organisation are consistent with the idea of HPWPs, and analyse how they are influenced by different stakeholders and ultimately associated with different indicators of organisational performance. The authors focused on six railway zones and interviewed a total of 62 HR practitioners. Findings: The results show that most practices implemented are aligned with the idea of HPWPs, despite the existence of context-specific unique practices. Furthermore, the authors identify the influence of multiple stakeholders in decision making concerning different practices. The authors additionally found that the measurement of performance goes beyond financial indicators and several context-specific non-financial indicators are identified and their social importance is reiterated. Originality/value: Theoretically, this paper utilises and contributes to the resource-based view of firms by identifying a distinctive bundle of competencies in human resources through HPWS in the IR

    Understanding the Role of Courage and Phronesis in the Strategy Work of Sustainability Professionals

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    Scholars have turned their attention to the notion of ā€˜radical sustainabilityā€™, which entails reorganizing organizations around sustainable values rather than treating sustainability as an add-on to ā€˜business as usualā€™. Calls for radical sustainability are seen as urgent in the turbulent world affected by grand challenges and wicked problems. However, the implementation of sustainability strategies is obstructed by tensions with mainstream strategies traditionally concerned with efficiency and profitability. We argue that these tensions can be unpacked and understood better by investigating sustainability professionalsā€™ courage as everyday experience, which they must have and employ to carry on with their strategy work. Building on MacIntyre's virtue ethics, we present courage as a ā€˜virtueā€™ requiring delicate balancing acts through practical judgements and fine sensing of the situations for the right moment to push the sustainability agenda forward incrementally. Such practical judgments, we argue, are affected by the multi-stakeholder interests and pressures as well as internal mainstream business priorities that complexify sustainability professionalsā€™ work

    Working in the Gaps: Exploring the Strategy Work of Accomplished Sustainability Professionals

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    This study explores how experienced sustainability professionals perform strategy work to integrate sustainability into business strategies and processes. Drawing on in-depth interviews and research on strategy-as-practice, sustainability, and paradox, we bring to light how divergent frames and competing temporalities conjointly work against sustainability integration. We develop a theoretical model that explains how sustainability professionals use persistent optimal cyclical stretching to navigate these barriers and integrate sustainability into businesses. We show that cyclical stretching constitutes an essential form of strategy work that requires sustainability professionals to continuously and judiciously open and stretch othersā€™ cognitive frames, temporal horizons and practice domains before cementing gains. By unpacking the complex process of cyclical stretching, the study offers new insights into the hard-fought strategy work involved in realizing sustainability transitions and draws attention to how divergent temporal orientations are central to the study of sustainability paradoxes and tensions
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