3 research outputs found

    CERTAIN ASPECTS OF THE POSITION AND RIGHTS OF CHILDREN AS VICTIMS OF CRIMINAL OFFENSES

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    Children, as well as minors in general, represent one of the most sensitive social groups, and consequently, criminal acts hit children particularly hard. For this reason, the domestic legislator, like the majority of other legislators, incriminates when the crime is committed against a child as a serious or heaviest form of a specific criminal offense, that is, as a special qualifying circumstance. However, in addition to the fact that, within the framework of criminal material legislation, it prescribes qualified forms of criminal acts when children are the victims, legislator, within the framework of juvenile criminal legislation and other special regulations, also prescribes other measures aimed at improving and protecting the position of the child in criminal proceedings. This is because the protection of children as victims of crime is not only a legal issue, but also a social and moral imperative, which must be taken seriously to ensure that all children receive the protection and support they need to grow and develop. In terms of what has been stated, this paper points to the regulation of the position of the child as a victim of a criminal offense, primarily at a national level, starting from general protection standards, to individual solutions in some of the specific forms of criminality where children often appear as victims – family and sexual violence

    To ventilate or not to ventilate during bystander CPR — A EuReCa TWO analysis

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    Background: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is still low. For every minute without resuscitation the likelihood of survival decreases. One critical step is initiation of immediate, high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of this subgroup analysis of data collected for the European Registry of Cardiac Arrest Study number 2 (EuReCa TWO) was to investigate the association between OHCA survival and two types of bystander CPR namely: chest compression only CPR (CConly) and CPR with chest compressions and ventilations (FullCPR). Method: In this subgroup analysis of EuReCa TWO, all patients who received bystander CPR were included. Outcomes were return of spontaneous circulation and survival to 30-days or hospital discharge. A multilevel binary logistic regression analysis with survival as the dependent variable was performed. Results: A total of 5884 patients were included in the analysis, varying between countries from 21 to 1444. Survival was 320 (8%) in the CConly group and 174 (13%) in the FullCPR group. After adjustment for age, sex, location, rhythm, cause, time to scene, witnessed collapse and country, patients who received FullCPR had a significantly higher survival rate when compared to those who received CConly (adjusted odds ration 1.46, 95% confidence interval 1.17–1.83). Conclusion: In this analysis, FullCPR was associated with higher survival compared to CConly. Guidelines should continue to emphasise the importance of compressions and ventilations during resuscitation for patients who suffer OHCA and CPR courses should continue to teach both

    To ventilate or not to ventilate during bystander CPR : a EuReCa TWO analysis

    No full text
    Background: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is still low. For every minute without resuscitation the likelihood of survival decreases. One critical step is initiation of immediate, high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The aim of this subgroup analysis of data collected for the European Registry of Cardiac Arrest Study number 2 (EuReCa TWO) was to investigate the association between OHCA survival and two types of bystander CPR namely: chest compression only CPR (CConly) and CPR with chest compressions and ventilations (FullCPR). Method: In this subgroup analysis of EuReCa TWO, all patients who received bystander CPR were included. Outcomes were return of spontaneous circulation and survival to 30-days or hospital discharge. A multilevel binary logistic regression analysis with survival as the dependent variable was performed. Results: A total of 5884 patients were included in the analysis, varying between countries from 21 to 1444. Survival was 320 (8%) in the CConly group and 174 (13%) in the FullCPR group. After adjustment for age, sex, location, rhythm, cause, time to scene, witnessed collapse and country, patients who received FullCPR had a significantly higher survival rate when compared to those who received CConly (adjusted odds ration 1.46, 95% confidence interval 1.17–1.83). Conclusion: In this analysis, FullCPR was associated with higher survival compared to CConly. Guidelines should continue to emphasise the importance of compressions and ventilations during resuscitation for patients who suffer OHCA and CPR courses should continue to teach both
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