4 research outputs found

    Noise characteristics in spaceflight multichannel EEG.

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    The cognitive performance of the crew has a major impact on mission safety and success in space flight. Monitoring of cognitive performance during long-duration space flight therefore is of paramount importance and can be performed using compact state-of-the-art mobile EEG. However, signal quality of EEG may be compromised due to the vicinity to various electronic devices and constant movements. We compare noise characteristics between in-flight extraterrestrial microgravity and ground-level terrestrial electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. EEG data recordings from either aboard International Space Station (ISS) or on earth's surface, utilizing three EEG amplifiers and two electrode types, were compared. In-flight recordings showed noise level of an order of magnitude lower when compared to pre- and post-flight ground-level recordings with the same EEG system. Noise levels between ground-level recordings with actively shielded cables, and in-flight recordings without shielded cables, were similar. Furthermore, noise level characteristics of shielded ground-level EEG recordings, using wet and dry electrodes, and in-flight EEG recordings were similar. Actively shielded mobile dry EEG systems will support neuroscientific research and neurocognitive monitoring during spaceflight, especially during long-duration space missions

    Detection of Cerebral Electroencephalographic Patterns After Median Nerve Stimulation During Propofol-Induced General Anesthesia : a Prospective Interventional Cohort Study

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    International audienceBackground: Devices used to assess depth of anesthesia and clinical parameters may not be sufficient to prevent intraoperative accidental awareness 1. An alternative would be to detect the patient's intention to move in order to alert the medical staff 2. We believe that the data obtained after multiple median nerve stimulation (MNS) during general anesthesia will help us to prevent intraoperative awareness 2. Methods: In this prospective, interventional trial, 30 volunteers aged from 18 to 81 years with informed consent will be enrolled for scheduled surgery from 15th January 2023 to 31st December 2026. Are excluded patients who are allergic to propofol or have a history of anaphylactic reaction, pregnant women and patients with a psychiatric disease. This study is approved by the CHU Brugmann ethical committee (CE 2021/225) and is registered at EUDRACT (2021-006457-56) and ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT05272202). EEG data based on MNS is first recorded with the patient awake, then a second recording is made under general anesthesia during the surgery. MNS is obtained by electrodes placed on the wrist. EEG signal is acquired by using a TMSi 64-channel system covering the scalp. An EEG amplifier records the changes in ERD (event-related desynchronization) and ERS (event-related synchronization) patterns at various concentrations of propofol delivered by a target-controlled infusion pump. The primary endpoint is the comparison of the average maximal values of amplitude of the ERD/ERS at rest and at various concentrations of propofol. The average ERDs max and ERSs max are compared with a Student t-test (P<0.05). Results: Our intermediate results (n=4 curarized patients) shows the ERS in the mu/beta frequency band after MNS before general anesthesia (Fig. 1A). After propofol induction, the post-stimulation ERS disappears significantly (Fig. 1B; P<0.01 with FDR correction). Conclusions: The preliminary data extracted from the ERD/ERS consecutive to MNS seems to disappear with high concentration of propofol contrary to previous studies at lower levels2. Therefore, this study is not conclusive in terms of the ERD/ERS patterns used but other EEG features (i.e., brain connectivity, somatosensory evoked potential) could be investigated and will be the subject of future research

    Evaluation of a quality improvement intervention to reduce anastomotic leak following right colectomy (EAGLE): pragmatic, batched stepped-wedge, cluster-randomized trial in 64 countries

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    Background Anastomotic leak affects 8 per cent of patients after right colectomy with a 10-fold increased risk of postoperative death. The EAGLE study aimed to develop and test whether an international, standardized quality improvement intervention could reduce anastomotic leaks. Methods The internationally intended protocol, iteratively co-developed by a multistage Delphi process, comprised an online educational module introducing risk stratification, an intraoperative checklist, and harmonized surgical techniques. Clusters (hospital teams) were randomized to one of three arms with varied sequences of intervention/data collection by a derived stepped-wedge batch design (at least 18 hospital teams per batch). Patients were blinded to the study allocation. Low- and middle-income country enrolment was encouraged. The primary outcome (assessed by intention to treat) was anastomotic leak rate, and subgroup analyses by module completion (at least 80 per cent of surgeons, high engagement; less than 50 per cent, low engagement) were preplanned. Results A total 355 hospital teams registered, with 332 from 64 countries (39.2 per cent low and middle income) included in the final analysis. The online modules were completed by half of the surgeons (2143 of 4411). The primary analysis included 3039 of the 3268 patients recruited (206 patients had no anastomosis and 23 were lost to follow-up), with anastomotic leaks arising before and after the intervention in 10.1 and 9.6 per cent respectively (adjusted OR 0.87, 95 per cent c.i. 0.59 to 1.30; P = 0.498). The proportion of surgeons completing the educational modules was an influence: the leak rate decreased from 12.2 per cent (61 of 500) before intervention to 5.1 per cent (24 of 473) after intervention in high-engagement centres (adjusted OR 0.36, 0.20 to 0.64; P &lt; 0.001), but this was not observed in low-engagement hospitals (8.3 per cent (59 of 714) and 13.8 per cent (61 of 443) respectively; adjusted OR 2.09, 1.31 to 3.31). Conclusion Completion of globally available digital training by engaged teams can alter anastomotic leak rates. Registration number: NCT04270721 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov)
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