26 research outputs found

    Persistent traditions: a long-term perspective on communities in the process of Neolithisation in the Lower Rhine Area (5500-2500 cal BC)

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    The adoption of agriculture is one of the major developments in human history. Archaeological studies have demonstrated that the trajectories of Neolithisation in Northwest Europe were diverse. This book presents a study into the archaeology of the indigenous communities involved in the process of Neolithisation in the Lower Rhine Area (5500-2500 cal BC). It elucidates the role played by these in relation to their environmental context. This work brings together a comprehensive array of excavated archaeological sites in the Lower Rhine Area and indicates that the successive Late Mesolithic, Swifterbant culture, Hazendonk group and Vlaardingen culture societies represent a continuous long-term tradition of inhabitation of the wetlands and their margins. After demonstrating the existence of a diverse Mesolithic background to Neolithisation, the subsequent developments are studied by foregrounding the relationship between local communities and the dynamic wetland landscape. This points to long-term flexible behaviour and pragmatic choices in livelihood, food economy and mobility. For the interpretation of Neolithisation this study emphasises the persistent traditions of the communities involved. New elements are shown to be attuned to existing hunter-gatherer practices. By documenting indications of the mentalitĂ© of the wetland inhabitants, it is demonstrated that their mindset remains essentially ‘Mesolithic' for millennia.-Stichting Nederlands Museum voor Anthropologie en Praehistorie -Rijksmuseum van OudhedenEuropean Prehistor

    Op jacht onder de golven:Spitsen van been en gewei uit Doggerland

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    Neutron-based analyses of three Bronze Age metal objects: a closer look at the Buggenum, Jutphaas and Escharen artefacts

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    Three important Bronze Age copper-alloy artefacts from the permanent exhibition of the National Museum of Antiquity in Leiden (NL) have been studied by neutron-based methods. These artefacts are known as the Buggenum sword, the Jutphaas dirk, and the Escharen double axe. All three objects have been studied with neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA), a non-destructive method to determine the bulk elemental compositions. The Buggenum sword is also studied with time-of-flight neutron diffraction (TOF-ND) giving additional information about crystalline properties and internal material structures, and neutron tomography (NT), showing details of the construction of this sword and voids inside the material. The composition of the Jutphaas dirk is compared with the compositions of two other dirks belonging to the group of six Plougrescant-Ommerschans (PO) ceremonial dirks. The Escharen double axe, identified as being of the Zabitz type, variant Westeregeln, is a rare object in the Low Countries. It is compared to finds from Central Europe. The results for all three objects are discussed with regards to their archaeological contexts and their relation to other finds

    Persistent traditions: a long-term perspective on communities in the process of Neolithisation in the Lower Rhine Area (5500-2500 cal BC)

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    The adoption of agriculture is one of the major developments in human history. Archaeological studies have demonstrated that the trajectories of Neolithisation in Northwest Europe were diverse. This book presents a study into the archaeology of the indigenous communities involved in the process of Neolithisation in the Lower Rhine Area (5500-2500 cal BC). It elucidates the role played by these in relation to their environmental context. This work brings together a comprehensive array of excavated archaeological sites in the Lower Rhine Area and indicates that the successive Late Mesolithic, Swifterbant culture, Hazendonk group and Vlaardingen culture societies represent a continuous long-term tradition of inhabitation of the wetlands and their margins. After demonstrating the existence of a diverse Mesolithic background to Neolithisation, the subsequent developments are studied by foregrounding the relationship between local communities and the dynamic wetland landscape. This points to long-term flexible behaviour and pragmatic choices in livelihood, food economy and mobility. For the interpretation of Neolithisation this study emphasises the persistent traditions of the communities involved. New elements are shown to be attuned to existing hunter-gatherer practices. By documenting indications of the mentalitĂ© of the wetland inhabitants, it is demonstrated that their mindset remains essentially ‘Mesolithic' for millennia.</p

    A long slow goodbye – Re-examining the Mesolithic – Neolithic transition (5500 – 2500 BCE) in the Dutch delta

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    Neolithic societies in the Dutch wetlands are characterised as “extended broad-spectrum hunter-gatherers”. They adopted agricultural elements only gradually and wild resources continue to play an important role in subsistence. However, the exact duration of the process of neolithisation in the Dutch wetlands is debated. We analyse the taxonomic diversity of faunal assemblages from the late Mesolithic and Neolithic in the Netherlands. We demonstrate that the diversity of exploited faunal resources remains remarkably constant throughout the Neolithic. We interpret this to show that the reliance on an extended broad-spectrum economy was not a transitional phase, but was a viable economic system in its own right.NWOVidi 276-60-004Human Origin
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