33 research outputs found

    High surgeon volume and positive surgical margins can predict the risk of biochemical recurrence after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

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    Background: The aim of this study was to determine whether any clinical factors are independent predictors of positive surgical margins (PSM), and to assess the association of PSM and biochemical recurrence (BR) after robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Methods: The population included cases with negative surgical margins (control group) and patients with PSM (study group). Tumor grade was evaluated according to the International Society of Urologic Pathology (ISUP) system. A logistic regression model assessed the independent association of factors with the risk of PSM. The risk of BR was assessed by Cox\u2019s multivariate proportional hazards. Results: A total of 732 consecutive patients were evaluated. Extend pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND) was performed in 342 cases (46.7%). Overall, 192 cases (26.3%) had PSM. The risk of PSM was positively associated with the percentage of biopsy positive cores (BPC; odds ratio, OR = 1.012; p = 0.004), extracapsular extension (pT3a; OR=2.702; p < 0.0001), invasion of seminal vesicle (pT3b; OR = 2.889; p < 0.0001), but inversely with body mass index (OR = 0.936; p = 0.021), and high surgeon volume (OR = 0.607; p = 0.006). Independent clinical factors associated with the risk of BR were baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA; hazard ratio, HR = 1.064; p = 0.004), BPC (HR = 1.015; p = 0.027), ISUP biopsy grade group (BGG) 2/3 (HR = 2.966; p = 0.003), and BGG 4/5 (HR = 3.122; p = 0.022). Pathologic factors associated with the risk of BR were ISUP group 4/5 (HR = 3.257; p = 0.001), pT3b (HR = 2.900; p = 0.003), and PSM (HR = 2.096; p = 0.045). Conclusions: In our cohort, features related to host, tumor, and surgeon volume are associated with the risk of PSM, which is also an independent parameter predicting BR after RARP. The surgical volume of the operating surgeon is an independent factor that decreases the risk of PSM, and, as such, the risk of BR

    Total testosterone density predicts high tumor load and disease reclassification of prostate cancer: results in 144 low-risk patients who underwent radical prostatectomy

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    Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between total testosterone density (TTD), defined as the ratio of serum TT to prostate volume (PV), and high tumor load (HTL) in low-risk prostate cancer (PCA) patients who underwent radical prostatectomy. Materials and methods: Tumor load was defined as the percentage of prostate volume invaded by cancer (PPI-PCA) in the surgical specimen. Pathologic features including tumor upgrading, upstaging or positive surgical margins in the specimen defined unfavorable disease (UD). PSA, TT, PSA density (PSAD), TTD, percentage of biopsy positive cores (BPC), PV and body mass index (BMI). The association of factors with the risk UD and HTL was evaluated by statistical methods. Results: The cohort included 144 consecutive low-risk PCA patients. Overall, 104 patients (72.2%) had at least one feature indicating UD. TTD was associated with BMI, TT, PSA, PV and PPI-PCA 65 20% defined as HTL. A higher PPI-PCA was associated with an increased risk of UD with a fair discriminant power (area under the curve, AUC = 0.775; p 20% were considered the study group versus patients with a PPI-PCA < 20% (control group). BPC, PSAD and TTD were independently associated with the risk of HTL (PPI-PCA 65 20%) with receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curves indicating the same discriminant power for BPC (AUC = 0.628; p = 0.013), PSAD (AUC = 0.611; p = 0.032) and TTD (AUC = 0.610; p = 0.032). Conclusions: Among low-risk PCA patients, TTD is associated with the risk of HTL, which is an independent predictor of UD and should be evaluated in the management of these patients

    High body mass index predicts multiple prostate cancer lymph node metastases after radical prostatectomy and extended pelvic lymph node dissection

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    Our aim is to evaluate the association between body mass index (BMI) and preoperative total testosterone (TT) levels with the risk of single and multiple metastatic lymph node invasion (LNI) in prostate cancer patients undergoing radical prostatectomy and extended pelvic lymph node dissection. Preoperative BMI, basal levels of TT, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were evaluated in 361 consecutive patients undergoing radical prostatectomy with extended pelvic lymph node dissection between 2014 and 2017. Patients were grouped into either nonmetastatic, one, or more than one metastatic lymph node invasion groups. The association among clinical factors and LNI was evaluated. LNI was detected in 52 (14.4%) patients: 28 (7.8%) cases had one metastatic node and 24 (6.6%) had more than one metastatic node. In the overall study population, BMI correlated inversely with TT (r = -0.256; P &lt; 0.0001). In patients without metastases, BMI inversely correlated with TT (r = -0.282; P &lt; 0.0001). In patients with metastasis, this correlation was lost. In the overall study population, BMI (odds ratio [OR] = 1.268; P = 0.005) was the only independent clinical factor associated with the risk of multiple metastatic LNI compared to cases with one metastatic node. In the nonmetastatic group, TT was lower in patients with BMI &gt;28 kg m-2 (P &lt; 0.0001). In patients with any LNI, this association was lost (P = 0.232). The median number of positive nodes was higher in patients with BMI &gt;28 kg m-2 (P = 0.048). In our study, overweight and obese patients had a higher risk of harboring multiple prostate cancer lymph node metastases and lower TT levels when compared to patients with normal BMI

    Inverse Association of Prostatic Chronic Inflammation among Prostate Cancer Tumor Grade Groups: Retrospective Study of 738 Consecutive Cases Elected to a First Random Biopsy Set

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    Objectives: The study aimed to evaluate associations of prostatic chronic inflammation (PCI) with prostate cancer (PCA) grade groups by the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP). Methods: The study evaluated retrospectively 738 cases. The patient population was sampled into 3 groups collecting cases without and with PCA including subjects with lSUP grade group 1 and grade groups 2-5. Results: PCI was assessed in 185 patients (25.1%) and PCA in 361 patients (48.9%) of whom 188 (25.5%) had ISUP grade and 173 (23.4%) had ISUP groups 2-5 tumors. PCI inversely related to ISUP groups (p &lt; 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, the risk of ISUP grade group 1 PCA compared to negative cases associated positively with age (OR 1.042; p = 0.001) but inversely with total prostate volume (TPV; OR 0.965; p &lt; 0.0001) and PCI (OR 0.314; p &lt; 0.0001). Intermediate-high grade tumors associated positively with age (OR 1.065; p &lt; 0.0001), prostate specific antigen (OR 1.167; p &lt; 0.0001), and abnormal digital rectal examination (OR 2.251; p &lt; 0.0001) but inversely with TPV (OR 0.921; p &lt; 0.0001) and PCI (OR 0.106; p &lt; 0.0001). Conclusions: PCI decreased the risk of PCA among ISUP tumor grade groups. (C) 2018 S. Karger AG, Base

    Prostate specific antigen levels and proportion of biopsy positive cores are independent predictors of upgrading patterns in low risk prostate cancer

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    To evaluate clinical factors associated with the risk of tumour upgrading patterns in low risk prostate cancer (PCA) patients undergoing radical prostatectomy
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