21 research outputs found

    Adversarial methods to reduce simulation bias in neutrino interaction event filtering at liquid argon time projection chambers

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    For current and future neutrino oscillation experiments using large liquid argon time projection chambers (LAr-TPCs), a key challenge is identifying neutrino interactions from the pervading cosmic-ray background. Rejection of such background is often possible using traditional cut-based selections, but this typically requires the prior use of computationally expensive reconstruction algorithms. This work demonstrates an alternative approach of using a 3D submanifold sparse convolutional network trained on low-level information from the scintillation light signal of interactions inside LAr-TPCs. This technique is applied to example simulations from ICARUS, the far detector of the short baseline neutrino program at Fermilab. The results of the network, show that cosmic background is reduced by up to 76.3% whilst neutrino interaction selection efficiency remains over 98.9%. We further present a way to mitigate potential biases from imperfect input simulations by applying domain adversarial neural networks (DANNs), for which modified simulated samples are introduced to imitate real data and a small portion of them are used for adversarial training. A series of mock-data studies are performed and demonstrate the effectiveness of using DANNs to mitigate biases, showing neutrino interaction selection efficiency performances significantly better than that achieved without the adversarial training.ISSN:1550-7998ISSN:0556-2821ISSN:1550-236

    Measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters from the T2K experiment using 3.6 × 10ÂČÂč protons on target

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    The T2K experiment presents new measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters using 19.7(16.3)×10ÂČ⁰ protons on target (POT) in (anti-)neutrino mode at the far detector (FD). Compared to the previous analysis, an additional 4.7×10ÂČ⁰ POT neutrino data was collected at the FD. Significant improvements were made to the analysis methodology, with the near-detector analysis introducing new selections and using more than double the data. Additionally, this is the first T2K oscillation analysis to use NA61/SHINE data on a replica of the T2K target to tune the neutrino flux model, and the neutrino interaction model was improved to include new nuclear effects and calculations. Frequentist and Bayesian analyses are presented, including results on sinÂČ Îžâ‚â‚ƒ and the impact of priors on the ÎŽ_CP measurement. Both analyses prefer the normal mass ordering and upper octant of sinÂČ Îžâ‚‚â‚ƒ with a nearly maximally CP-violating phase. Assuming the normal ordering and using the constraint on sinÂČ Îžâ‚â‚ƒ from reactors, sinÂČ Îžâ‚‚â‚ƒ = 0.561âș⁰.⁰ÂČÂč₋₀.₀₃₂ using Feldman–Cousins corrected intervals, and ΔmÂČ₃₂ = 2.494âș⁰.⁰⁎Âč₋₀.₀₅₈×10−3 eVÂČ using constant ΔχÂČ intervals. The CP-violating phase is constrained to ÎŽCP=−1.97âș⁰.âč⁷₋₀.₇₀ using Feldman–Cousins corrected intervals, and ÎŽ_CP = 0,π is excluded at more than 90% confidence level. A Jarlskog invariant of zero is excluded at more than 2σ credible level using a flat prior in ÎŽCP, and just below 2σ using a flat prior in sin ÎŽ_CP. When the external constraint on sinÂČ Îžâ‚â‚ƒ is removed, sinÂČ Îžâ‚â‚ƒ = 28.0+2.8−6.5×10−3, in agreement with measurements from reactor experiments. These results are consistent with previous T2K analyses.ISSN:1434-6044ISSN:1434-605

    Searching for solar KDAR with DUNE

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    The observation of 236 MeV muon neutrinos from kaon-decay-at-rest (KDAR) originating in the core of the Sun would provide a unique signature of dark matter annihilation. Since excellent angle and energy reconstruction are necessary to detect this monoenergetic, directional neutrino flux, DUNE with its vast volume and reconstruction capabilities, is a promising candidate for a KDAR neutrino search. In this work, we evaluate the proposed KDAR neutrino search strategies by realistically modeling both neutrino-nucleus interactions and the response of DUNE. We find that, although reconstruction of the neutrino energy and direction is difficult with current techniques in the relevant energy range, the superb energy resolution, angular resolution, and particle identification offered by DUNE can still permit great signal/background discrimination. Moreover, there are non-standard scenarios in which searches at DUNE for KDAR in the Sun can probe dark matter interactions.ISSN:1475-751

    Future Opportunities in Accelerator-based Neutrino Physics

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    International audienceThis document summarizes the conclusions of the Neutrino Town Meeting held at CERN in October 2018 to review the neutrino field at large with the aim of defining a strategy for accelerator-based neutrino physics in Europe. The importance of the field across its many complementary components is stressed. Recommendations are presented regarding the accelerator based neutrino physics, pertinent to the European Strategy for Particle Physics. We address in particular i) the role of CERN and its neutrino platform, ii) the importance of ancillary neutrino cross-section experiments, and iii) the capability of fixed target experiments as well as present and future high energy colliders to search for the possible manifestations of neutrino mass generation mechanisms

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume I Introduction to DUNE

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    International audienceThe preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay—these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. This TDR is intended to justify the technical choices for the far detector that flow down from the high-level physics goals through requirements at all levels of the Project. Volume I contains an executive summary that introduces the DUNE science program, the far detector and the strategy for its modular designs, and the organization and management of the Project. The remainder of Volume I provides more detail on the science program that drives the choice of detector technologies and on the technologies themselves. It also introduces the designs for the DUNE near detector and the DUNE computing model, for which DUNE is planning design reports. Volume II of this TDR describes DUNE's physics program in detail. Volume III describes the technical coordination required for the far detector design, construction, installation, and integration, and its organizational structure. Volume IV describes the single-phase far detector technology. A planned Volume V will describe the dual-phase technology

    Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), Far Detector Technical Design Report, Volume II: DUNE Physics

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    The preponderance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, the dynamics of the supernovae that produced the heavy elements necessary for life, and whether protons eventually decay -- these mysteries at the forefront of particle physics and astrophysics are key to understanding the early evolution of our universe, its current state, and its eventual fate. DUNE is an international world-class experiment dedicated to addressing these questions as it searches for leptonic charge-parity symmetry violation, stands ready to capture supernova neutrino bursts, and seeks to observe nucleon decay as a signature of a grand unified theory underlying the standard model. The DUNE far detector technical design report (TDR) describes the DUNE physics program and the technical designs of the single- and dual-phase DUNE liquid argon TPC far detector modules. Volume II of this TDR, DUNE Physics, describes the array of identified scientific opportunities and key goals. Crucially, we also report our best current understanding of the capability of DUNE to realize these goals, along with the detailed arguments and investigations on which this understanding is based. This TDR volume documents the scientific basis underlying the conception and design of the LBNF/DUNE experimental configurations. As a result, the description of DUNE's experimental capabilities constitutes the bulk of the document. Key linkages between requirements for successful execution of the physics program and primary specifications of the experimental configurations are drawn and summarized. This document also serves a wider purpose as a statement on the scientific potential of DUNE as a central component within a global program of frontier theoretical and experimental particle physics research. Thus, the presentation also aims to serve as a resource for the particle physics community at large

    Reconstruction of interactions in the ProtoDUNE-SP detector with Pandora

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    International audienceThe Pandora Software Development Kit and algorithm libraries provide pattern-recognition logic essential to the reconstruction of particle interactions in liquid argon time projection chamber detectors. Pandora is the primary event reconstruction software used at ProtoDUNE-SP, a prototype for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment far detector. ProtoDUNE-SP, located at CERN, is exposed to a charged-particle test beam. This paper gives an overview of the Pandora reconstruction algorithms and how they have been tailored for use at ProtoDUNE-SP. In complex events with numerous cosmic-ray and beam background particles, the simulated reconstruction and identification efficiency for triggered test-beam particles is above 80% for the majority of particle type and beam momentum combinations. Specifically, simulated 1 GeV/cc charged pions and protons are correctly reconstructed and identified with efficiencies of 86.1±0.6\pm0.6% and 84.1±0.6\pm0.6%, respectively. The efficiencies measured for test-beam data are shown to be within 5% of those predicted by the simulation
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