1,954 research outputs found

    Tests of new instrument for measuring Dublin Descriptors

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    In the summer of 2007 a new instrument was developed which aimed at providingan operationalisation of the Dublin descriptors (Appendix 1). Special attention waspaid thereby to the so-called ‘anchor problem’ inherent in most self-assessments:the lack of an objective frame of reference against which different respondents canassess their own level of competence.The instrument consists of a combination of general and specific items. First of alla general item was formulated for each of the 5 Dublin descriptors. The generalitems were formulated in such a way as to match the original descriptors as closelyas possible. Anchors were developed for each of these items which correspond tojunior college, bachelors and masters levels. For example, for the item“communication” the junior college level was indicated by the anchor “is able totransmit information”, the bachelors level by "is able to communicate ideas andtransmit solutions” and the master level by “is able to communicate conclusionsand the knowledge, motivations and considerations that underlie these conclusionsin a convincing manner”. The anchors for the bachelors and masters level arederived more or less directly from the Dublin descriptors, and those for the juniorcollege level are based on the European Qualification Framework. For practicalreasons it was decided not to develop anchors for the PhD level. The anchors wereplaced in a scale ranging from 1 to 8, with the junior college level being assigned ascale value of 2, the bachelors level the value 5 and the masters level the value 7.This allowed respondents the option of choosing a level above masters level orbelow junior college level if they find that appropriate. The distances betweenjunior college, bachelors and masters level approximates the mean differences inyears of education corresponding to each level.labour market entry and occupational careers;

    Report on the Conference on Historical Archaeology and the National Estate

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    Details of the proceedings for the Conference on Historical Archaeology and the National Estate. Development of a National Register of Historic Sites

    Circles of Color

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    Introduction

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    Gobi Gossip, 1954-1966

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    The Gobi Gossip was an informal publication that Jim Allen (Project Air Officer at the Siskiyou Smokejumper Base from 1953-1964) created. The first Gossip was sent to out in December of 1954 as a review of the preceding fire season. Allen wanted to keep connected with his jumpers with “Just a little news about life here on the Gobi since Fire Season.” That ‘little news’ summarized the season, added news of jumper accomplishments post-season, and provided contact for the crew members. The Gossip was extended to several times a year to keep contact alive. The Gobi Gossip as a collection helps to accent what made the Gobi special. Allen had a simple way of connecting with jumpers, keeping them informed, and acknowledging their part of the Gobi greatness.https://dc.ewu.edu/smokejumping_pubs/1008/thumbnail.jp

    Coupled Fluids-Radiation Analysis of a High-Mass Mars Vehicle

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    The NEQAIR line-by-line radiation code has been incorporated into the DPLR Navier-Stokes flow solver such that the NEQAIR subroutines are now callable functions of DPLR. The coupled DPLR-NEQAIR code was applied to compute the convective and radiative heating rates over high-mass Mars entry vehicles. Two vehicle geometries were considered - a 15 m diameter 70-degree sphere cone configuration and a slender, mid-L/D vehicle with a diameter of 5 m called an Ellipsled. The entry masses ranged from 100 to 165 metric tons. Solutions were generated for entry velocities ranging from 6.5 to 9.1 km/s. The coupled fluids-radiation solutions were performed at the peak heating location along trajectories generated by the Traj trajectory analysis code. The impact of fluids-radiation coupling is a function of the level of radiative heating and the freestream density and velocity. For the high-mass Mars vehicles examined in this study, coupling effects were greatest for entry velocities above 8.5 km/s where the surface radiative heating was reduced by up 17%. Generally speaking, the Ellipsled geometry experiences a lower peak radiative heating rate but a higher peak turbulent convective heating rate than the MSL-based vehicle
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