22 research outputs found

    Nigeria: a heavy blow

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    More than the COVID-19 pandemic itself, the lockdowns to prevent its spread have harder hit Nigeria’s unorganized small-scale fishers. The COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally struck all facets of life in affected countries and the small-scale fisheries (SSF) of Nigeria are no exception. The pandemic has hit the country’s small fishers both directly and indirectly. Small operators are the bulk of Nigeria’s fisheries sector. They account for 70 per cent of the domestic fish production, and sustain the livelihoods of millions of people in one way or another; the dependence on local fish species for economic and food security is evidently large. SSF provides an accessible, cheap and rich source of protein and essential micronutrients to the rural population. Their impact on social, economic and cultural spheres is immense

    Experimental and survey-based data on willingness to pay for seafood safety and environmental sustainability certification in Nigeria

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    Aquatic foods, including fish, are a substantial component of animal source foods globally, and make a critical nutritional contribution to diets in many contexts. In the global North, concern among consumers and regulators over the safety and environmental sustainability of seafood, particularly in developed nations, has led to the development of increasingly stringent seafood safety standards. While such standards may constitute regularity, logistical, and economic barriers to participation in export markets by small-scale producers, they have in other contexts catalysed upgrades to production and post-harvest handling practices within value chains associated with both capture fisheries and aquaculture. The health burden of foodborne illnesses is a major concern in developing countries. As incomes rise, consumers in developing countries are increasingly willing to pay a premium for safer and environmentally sustainable foods. However, there is little empirical evidence on consumers' willingness to pay for seafood safety in developing countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Data on demand for seafood safety and environmental sustainability certification in African countries are largely unavailable in the public domain. In this paper, we describe data collected in Lagos State, Nigeria in October and November 2019. Experiments in the form of Becker-DeGroote-Marschak (BDM) auction mechanism, and post experiment surveys were conducted with 200 fish consumers in fish markets. These data can be used to assess whether consumers' demand for safe and healthy seafood from local markets can be harnessed to generate positive economic returns to producers. (C) 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc

    The role of small-scale fisheries in Nigeria’s food system

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    This discussion paper draws together recent data on fish and aquatic foods, and nutrition in Nigeria, to examine how small-scale fisheries fit within and contribute to Nigeria’s food system. Much of the analysis and exploration we present here are of very recent data from global, national, and local initiatives. This discussion paper has a particular focus on Sustainable Development Goals 2, and other goals and targets related to human nutrition, food security, and sustainable food production and supplies

    Are consumers in developing countries willing to pay for aquaculture food safety certification? Evidence from a field experiment in Nigeria

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    Many developing countries face challenges in managing food safety risks associated with consumption of animalsource foods. Efforts to address these challenges increasingly recognize the role of certification in agri-food systems governance. Understanding consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for food safety certification is fundamental to determining the appropriate design and implementation of programs to reduce the burden of foodborne illnesses in developing countries. To address this need, we implemented a framed field experiment with consumers of eight farm-raised African Catfish (Clarias gariepinus) products varying in certification status (safety certified versus uncertified) and product forms (live versus smoked) to examine their WTP for food safety certification in Nigeria. We applied a mixed-effects model to account for the hierarchical structure of the data with one participant entering multiple bids, and estimated a model with participant fixed effects as a robustness check. We found that consumers were willing to pay between 3.1% and 18.8% more for fish certified as safe compared to uncertified fish. Furthermore, there was an asymmetry in food safety certification valuation, with consumers paying significant premiums for high-value larger-sized certified live and smoked catfish, but not smaller-sized certified live and smoked catfish. The results are robust to a specification in which consumer fixed effects are included. Our findings suggest there exists consumer demand for certification programs to upgrade the food safety standards of higher-value fish products in Nigeria's domestic markets. Lower-value fish products typically consumed by lower-income consumers show less potential for certification. Alternative safety regulation is needed to ensure safety practices for low-end fish products

    Availability and Usability of ICT as an Instructional Strategy for Improving Teaching and Learning Biology in Nigerian Secondary Schools

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    A descriptive survey was carried out to investigate the availability and usability of ICT tools as a strategy for biology instruction in Nigerian secondary schools.Materials and Methods: The population for the study included all biology teachers in Ondo state; 60 biology teachers were randomly selected for this study, these included 30 biology teachers from the rural schools and 30 biology teachers from the urban center. A structured questionnaire which adopted a four-point Likert rating scale was employed. The questionnaire consists of three sections namely; Section A, which has three demographic data, Section B, which is on the availability of ICT tools in the secondary schools, Section C, which consists of fourteen (14) items on the competency of biology teachers and the usability of ICT in the implementation of Biology curriculum.  The questionnaire was vetted by experts from Africa Center of Excellence for Innovative and Transformative STEM Education, Lagos State University, Nigeria, for content and face validity.Results: Findings from the study show that out of the (6) ICT tools identified for biology instruction in senior secondary schools, only (2) were adequately available (computer laboratory and generator), but not often utilized by the teachers for effective instruction in Biology, while the other tools were either not available or not adequately available. Furthermore, results from the study indicated that there is no statistically significant difference in the opinions of teachers from government and private schools, teachers from rural and urban schools on the availability and usability of ICT tools in senior secondary schools in Ondo State.  Further analysis revealed no statically significant main effects of school status and school location on the responses of biology teachers (p<0.05). Keywords: ICT, Instructional Strategy, Availability, Usability and Biology Curriculum DOI: 10.7176/JEP/13-16-09 Publication date:June 30th 202

    Construction programme management theory and practice: Contextual and pragmatic approach

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    The combination of the economic pressures, maturity and limitations of project management and the dynamic nature of the construction industry clients’ requirements has triggered the need for the adoption and implementation of programme management as a de facto means of aligning, coordinating and managing a portfolio of construction projects to deliver benefits that would not be achievable if the projects were managed independently. Despite the benefits achievable in the practice of programme management, the awareness and understanding of its practice in the construction industry remains vague as a result of a lack of clarity and inconsistencies associated with its definitions. To fully understand the core essence of programme management, it is imperative that its quintessential definition, practice and context are clearly understood and documented. This research is based on a pragmatic synthesis of literature review and industrial questionnaire survey which establishes the relationship, similarities and differences between programme management and project management and subsequently draws comparisons of the practices relevant to programmes between programme and non-programme organisations. The research further highlights the implications of unawareness and lack of understanding that can affect the effective implementation and practice of programme management in the UK construction environment

    Major challenges to the successful implementation and practice of programme management in the construction environment: A critical analysis

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    For the construction industry to survive the current turbulence in the economic atmosphere, it has the option of integrating new initiatives to march the uncertainties. Programme management is seen as an efficient vehicle to successfully deliver the improvements and changes. However, the implementation of any new system or change initiatives has always been a challenging task; some of these challenges can be faced during the implementation or at practice stage. Programme management is not exempt from such challenges, in order to successfully implement and practice programme management, the knowledge of the major challenges associated to effective implementation and practice should not be left to serendipity or sagacity. Due to the lack of clarity surrounding programme management in the construction industry, the understanding of these major challenges remains vague. To provide a deeper insight into the major challenges to implementation and practice of construction programme management, this paper conducts both a pragmatic and theoretical study by triangulating literature, industrial questionnaire survey and semi-structured interviews. The research was conducted in the UK construction industry and other programme management sectors to analyse and exploit the knowledge of these challenges for effective implementation and practice of construction programmes. A total of 119 usable questionnaires were received and 17 semi-structured interviews were conducted, analysed and synthesised to provide a broader view on the major challenges and how to effectively implement and practice construction programmes
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