13 research outputs found

    Typii Petropolitanum brasiliensium : un catálogo de typus de musgos depositados en el Instituto Botánico Komarov (LE) en St. Petersburgo, Rusia.

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    The herbarium LE of the Komarov Botanical Institute in Saint Petersburg (former Leningrad), Russia holds one of the least known Brazilian moss collections in the world. In this paper we provide a list the Brazilian types of mosses deposited in the type collection of LE. Totaling types for 41 species names from Brazil are listed.EL Instituto Botánico Komarov (Herbario de Leningrado–LE) ubicado en San Petersburgo, Rusia, contiene una de las menos conocidas colecciones de musgos Brasileiros en el mundo. En este trabajo listamos los typus de musgos depositados en la colección de typus de LE, en un total de 41 nombres para Brasil

    Characteristics of insulin therapy of diabetes mellitus type 1 in children and adolescents receiving glucocorticoids

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    BACKGROUND: In coexistence of diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) with severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases some patients need simultaneous administration of insulin and glucocorticoids (GC). GC therapy in patients with DM1 can worsen glycemic control. AIM: To determine characteristics of insulin therapy of DM1 in children and adolescents receiving GC. DESCRIPTION OF CLINICAL CASES: We observed 5 patients with DM1 receiving GC for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), juvenile systemic sclerosis (JSS), juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), ulcerative colitis (UC), and reactive arthritis (RA). Intra-articular administration of GC did not significantly influence glycemic control. In case of GC pulse therapy hyperglycemia and increased insulin requirements were recognized in 3–6 hours after GC receipt, persisted from few hours up to 3 days after each administration. While therapy with oral GC in high doses the worst glycemic control was registered in daylight hours. To overcome insulin resistance change of time of injection and 10%-increase of long-acting insulin analogue, additional injections of ultrashort-acting insulin analogues, temporal prescription of short-acting human insulin were used. While GC therapy insulin daily dose was individual and could reach 2.0 U/kg. After transition to maintaining doses of GC or discontinuation of GC therapy patients returned to standard or relatively low insulin requirements. Levels of glycosylated hemoglobin differed significantly among patients at different stages of treatment, were maximal while long-term therapy with high doses of oral GC, but mostly depended on patient’s compliance. CONCLUSION: Bettering of glycemic control while receiving GC can be reached by timely dose correction of insulin therapy, selection of individual schemes, taking into account time of receipt and pharmacokinetic characteristics of GC. Adherence of the patient and his family to treatment of DM1 plays an important role in glycemic control

    Quantitative analysis of ribosome–mRNA complexes at different translation stages

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    Inhibition of primer extension by ribosome–mRNA complexes (toeprinting) is a proven and powerful technique for studying mechanisms of mRNA translation. Here we have assayed an advanced toeprinting approach that employs fluorescently labeled DNA primers, followed by capillary electrophoresis utilizing standard instruments for sequencing and fragment analysis. We demonstrate that this improved technique is not merely fast and cost-effective, but also brings the primer extension inhibition method up to the next level. The electrophoretic pattern of the primer extension reaction can be characterized with a precision unattainable by the common toeprint analysis utilizing radioactive isotopes. This method allows us to detect and quantify stable ribosomal complexes at all stages of translation, including initiation, elongation and termination, generated during the complete translation process in both the in vitro reconstituted translation system and the cell lysate. We also point out the unique advantages of this new methodology, including the ability to assay sites of the ribosomal complex assembly on several mRNA species in the same reaction mixture

    Formation of “Urban planning” indicators for “Smart City” concept (on the example of SKOLKOVO, Moscow)

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    The development of “Smart Cities” is associated with a comprehensive study of the General system of settlement. The aim of the study is to use the system of indicators for the objective assessment of territories, as well as determining the effect of each part in the overall assessment of the functioning of the «Smart City». The leading method of research is a comparative analysis of international rankings, surveys of experts and a comprehensive study of indicators. The article analyzes the papers of specialists working in the field of research «Smart Cities» and technologies: Mueller, Battarra, Srivastava, Dolgikh etc. The basis for this work were the studies by authoritative rating organizations such as IESE Business School University of Navarra, Vienna University of Technology and Research Institute of technology and communications (NIITC, Russia) which allowed to generalize the available research from the perspective of sustainable development and use them on a concrete example.The authors have adapted the existing groups of indicators in relation to the SKOLKOVO innovation city, Russia. The applied system is represented by 7 groups and 23 indicators, which allow to present the planning aspect of the current urban planning structure with its impact on human capital, transport infrastructure, social cohesion, the state of the environment, etc. The work lets confirm the influence of the selected indicators on the development of SKOLKOVO (Russia) and use the obtained data for the rating of “Smart Cities” adapted for Russia. The materials of the article can be extremely useful in the designing of concepts for the development of territories focused on the use of smart solutions in order to minimize costs in the implementation of new solutions

    Flora of lichens, mosses and liverworts of Wrangel Island: New records

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    New records to lichen flora and bryoflora of Wrangel Island are presented. The additions to the island cryptogam flora include 32 lichens and one lichenicolous fungus, 26 mosses and eleven liverwort species. Acarospora sinopica, Alectoria gowardii, Austroplaca sibirica, Calogaya bryochrysion, Hymenelia ceracea, Porpidia ochrolemma, and Sagiolechia protuberans are new to the island and to the Russian Far East. Two lichen species (Lecidea lithophila and Rinodina terrestris), as well as two liverwort taxa (Clevea hyaline, Lophoziopsis excisa var. elegans and Pseudolophozia debiliformis), are new to the Chukotka Autonomous Area. Two of the reported moss species (Funaria arctica and Schistidium umbrosum) are extremely rare. Location data and ecological descriptions for the newly reported species are included

    Integrative taxonomy reveals too extensive lumping and a new species in the moss genus <i>Amphidium</i> (Bryophyta)

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    <p>An integrative taxonomic approach, including molecular phylogenetic reconstructions based on plastid <i>rps4-trnF</i> and nuclear ITS sequences, statistical analysis of morphological-anatomical characters, and classical taxonomy, indicates that the reduction of 13 <i>Amphidium</i> species to three in a recent morphological revision represents a case of too extensive lumping. Instead, six <i>Amphidium</i> species can be distinguished based on molecular and morphological data, the widespread <i>Amphidium lapponicum</i>, <i>A. mougeotii</i>, and <i>A. tortuosum</i>, as well as the Macaronesian endemic <i>A. curvipes</i>, the North American endemic <i>A. californicum</i>, and a newly discovered species from Central Asia (southern Siberia and northern Mongolia), <i>A. asiaticum</i> sp. nov. Diagnostic morphological characters for all six species are discussed. The present data confirm that species diversity of <i>Amphidium</i> is highest in the Holarctic, where all six species occur.</p

    IL-5-producing CD4+ T cells and eosinophils cooperate to enhance response to immune checkpoint blockade in breast cancer

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    Immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) has heralded a new era in cancer therapy. Research into the mechanisms underlying response to ICB has predominantly focused on T cells; however, effective immune responses require tightly regulated crosstalk between innate and adaptive immune cells. Here, we combine unbiased analysis of blood and tumors from metastatic breast cancer patients treated with ICB with mechanistic studies in mouse models of breast cancer. We observe an increase in systemic and intratumoral eosinophils in patients and mice responding to ICB treatment. Mechanistically, ICB increased IL-5 production by CD4+ T cells, stimulating elevated eosinophil production from the bone marrow, leading to systemic eosinophil expansion. Additional induction of IL-33 by ICB-cisplatin combination or recombinant IL-33 promotes intratumoral eosinophil infiltration and eosinophil-dependent CD8+ T cell activation to enhance ICB response. This work demonstrates the critical role of eosinophils in ICB response and provides proof-of-principle for eosinophil engagement to enhance ICB efficacy

    A miniature world in decline: European Red List of Mosses, Liverworts and Hornworts

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    This publication has been prepared by IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) as a deliverable of the LIFE European Red Lists project (LIFE14 PRE BE 001). A miniature world in decline: The European Red List of Mosses, Liverworts and Hornworts is, therefore, a part of a series of publications released since 2015, when the project began, that also include: • European Red List of Lycopods and Ferns, 2017 • European Red List of Saproxylic Beetles, 2018 • European Red list of Terrestrial Molluscs: slugs, snails, and semi-slugs, 2019 • European Red list of Trees, 2019 • European Red list of Selected Endemic Shrubs, 2019 Based on other European Red List assessments, 59% of freshwater molluscs, 40% of freshwater fishes, 28% of grasshoppers, crickets and bush-crickets, 23% of amphibians, 20% of reptiles, 20% of ferns and lycopods, 17% of mammals, 16% of dragonflies, 13% of birds, 9% of butterflies and bees, 8% of aquatic plants and 2% of medicinal plants are threatened at the European level (Allen et al., 2014; IUCN, 2015; Hochkirch et al., 2016; García Criado et al., 2017). Additional European Red Lists assessing a selection of species showed that 22% of terrestrial molluscs, 16% of crop wild relatives and 18% of saproxylic beetles are also threatened (Cuttelod et al., 2011; Bilz et al., 2011; Cálix et al., 2018). The findings of this work suggest that 23% of bryophytes are threatened species in Europe, representing the fifth most threatened group of plants assessed so far
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