608 research outputs found

    Traditions and innovation in fine metalwork in the Middle Danube region in the second half of the 5th and the early 6th centuries A.D. Once more on the 'Szarvas' brooch group: new finds, new hypotheses

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    The aim of this paper is to examine a group of brooches whose numbers have been increasing in recent years to determine their origins, their relationship to each other and their role in the fine metalwork, goldsmith practice of the period. These brooches and pairs of brooches were found in ten sites scattered across a large geographic area (Szarvas, La-Rue-Saint-Pierre, Bernhardsthal, Uppåkra, Narona, Hemmingen, ‘Italy’, Collegno, Domoszló, Nagyvárad). The artefacts share common features that can aid in determining the areas of production for objects within the group. We can confidently date them to the second half of the 5th and the early 6th centuries A.D. and examine their role in the development of the so-called Thuringian-type brooches. Furthermore, they allow us to investigate changes in female attire and shed light on the relationships between the Middle Danube region and Southern Sweden (Skåne)

    Excavation of the Late-Celtic urn-field at Swarling, Kent

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    This is an account of the excavations on the site of the a Late Celtic urn-field at Swarling, in Kent, England, undertaken in 1921. Included are descriptions of artefacts such as pottery and human remains, together with an account of the methodology used to unearth these

    Bow-tie shaped fibulae from the cemetery of Budapest/Aquincum-Graphisoft Park

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    The main aim of this paper is the presentation of two rare fibulae from the Eastern Cemetery of the civil town of Budapest/Aquincum. On the former territory of the Óbuda Gas Factory, new parts of the cemetery were excavated during the years 2004–2017 under the direction of G. Lassányi. The fibulae discussed in our study were found in the skeleton grave No. 795. These fibulae have a special form and their type can be defined easily. They belong to a low-numbered fibula type of Pannonia, the bow-tie shaped fibulae

    A thistle brooch/distelfibel from Brigetio

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    A very rare brooch was found during my research in the Collection of the Hungarian National Museum. According to the main characteristics, its type can be defined easily. It belongs to thistle-brooches/Distelfibeln. I would like to present this brooch in detail

    Fibulae and the Roman Army on the Danube in Moesia Superior

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    During the Roman period, fibulae, beside their primary function of fastening clothes, also functioned as jewellery and status symbols and, hence, were richly and diversely decorated. For this reason, the fibula exposed on the right shoulder, fastening a military cape sagum, pallium or paludamentum, could denote the military unit, rank or a kind of a decoration in the Roman army. The military fibulae from the Danube Limes of Upper Moesia (later Limes of the provinces of Moesia Prima and Dacia Ripensis) also have traits related to this region, specifically: the military character of this border province is reflected in the number and variety of types of military fibulae, most of these types were produced locally, while some also originated from the Danube Limes of Moesia Superior. The local production, intended for the army, began as early as the 2nd century and continued until the end of Antiquity, that is, until the first quarter/middle of the 7th century. Consequently, half a millennium of production of military fibulae in the lower Danube basin left a rich archaeological heritage in the area of present-day Serbia

    Ethnic Identity and Imperial Power

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    This study explores the theme of Batavian ethnicity and ethnogenesis in the context of the Early Roman Empire, starting with the current view of ethnicity as a culturally determined, subjective construct shaped through interaction with an ethnic 'other'. The study analyses literary, epigraphic and archaeological sources relating to the Batavian image and self-image against the background of the specific integration of the Batavian community into the Roman world. The Batavian society was exploited by the Roman authorities for the recruitment of auxiliary soldiers. As a result it developed into a full-blown military community. The study's main conclusion is that Rome exerted a profound influence on the formation of the Batavians both as a political entity and as an ethnic group. The combination of an explicit theoretical framework and a clear presentation of empirical data makes this book an indispensable work for all those interested in ethnicity and ethnogenesis in the context of the Roman Empire.In dit tiende deel van de AAS-serie staat de etnische ontwikkeling en etnogenese van de Bataven centraal in de context van het vroeg-Romeinse Rijk. Uitgangspunt vormt de duidige visie op etnische identiteit als een cultureel bepaalde, subjectieve constructie die tot stand komt in de interactie met de etnische 'ander'. Roymans maakt gebruik van historische en archeologische bronnen om het Bataafse imago en zelfbeeld te bestuderen tegen de achtergrond van de integratie van de Bataven in de Romeinse wereld. De Bataafse gemeenschap werd intensief geëxploiteerd door de Romeinse autoriteiten voor de recrutering van hulpsoldaten. Als het gevolg daarvan ontwikkelde zij zich tot een sterk gemilitariseerde gemeenschap. De belangrijkste conclusie in deze studie is dat Rome een vergaande invloed uitoefende op de vorming van de Bataven als politieke entiteit en als een etnische groep. De combinatie van een uitgebreid theoretisch kader met een heldere presentatie van empirische informatie maken dit boek tot een onmisbaar werk voor iedereen die geïnteresseerd in etniciteit en etnogenese ten tijde van de Romeinse overheersing

    The fibula production of Brigetio

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    This article continues the author’s paper The fibula production of Brigetio: clay moulds published in Dissertationes Archaeologicae 3.8 (2020). The main aim of this paper is the presentation of a model plus several semi-finished and waste fibulae from Brigetio, adding to our knowledge about the fibula production of this archaeological site

    Nowinka. Site 1 : the cemetery from the Late Migration Period in the northern Poland

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    The book was written to realize the research grant of the Ministry of Science and Information Technology: The burial ground of the Elbląg group from the West Balt circle at Nowinka, Tolkmicko com. The complete study and preparation for the publication (Project No.: N N109 0362 33; Contract No.: 0362/B/H03/2007/33).Agnieszka Uziębł

    Notes on the metal pyxides recently discovered in the Sarmatian environment south the Lower Mureș River

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    This study, although not exhaustive, attempts to analyse pieces of the type discovered in the Sarmatian environment of the Great Hungarian Plain starting from the bronze and iron pyxides discovered in 2010 during the rescue archaeological excavations prior the construction of the Arad-Timişoara Motorway, namely, sector Arad-Seceani, in graves 3 and 7 from the cemetery investigated at Hunedoara Timişană, Şagu commune, Arad county. The author discusses the pieces from Hunedoara Timişană, together with pieces recovered from other funerary complexes of the Great Hungarian Plain, in a broader context and concludes that the graves where they were identified are women and children graves. The pyxides from G 3 at Hunedoara Timişană, together with the rest of the grave goods, but also with those of the surrounding graves, support a dating most likely to the second-third/mid-third quarter of the 3rd century AD. The specimen in G 7 was interpreted as having been used as a rattle (Pyxidenklapper), thus rather fulfilling the function of a pendant, the grave dating sometime to the chronological interval between the end of the 2nd – 3rd quarter of the 3rd century AD. Upon the analysis of such metal pieces recovered in the Sarmatian environment, the author notes that they are not often recorded in the Sarmatian cemeteries of the Great Hungarian Plain and that their diffusion area lies mainly in the Tisza river basin, being also represented in the territory between the Lower Mureş, Tisza and Danube. Based on their manufacture, together with their decoration and its execution, the author concludes that the bronze pyxides from G 3 at Hunedoara Timişană likely are artifacts made by a Roman artisan, possibly travelling, active in the area of economic interaction near the Roman limes. Finally, the author concludes that metal pyxides from the Sarmatian environment of the Great Hungarian Plain, like the rest of the eastern Sarmatian world, include containers for both cosmetic products as well as for a variety of medicinal herbs
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